What's new
What's new

Rigging a KO Lee B6060 Cutter Grinder

AndyF

New member
I'll be moving this machine this weekend. What's the best way to load and unload it from a trailer? At the site they have a fork truck and at the destination either a gantry or possibly a fork truck (if we can convince it to start in the cold).

When I looked at it, there didn't seem to be any immediately obvious lifting points for an overhead lift. Also, will it be OK to move it ~20 miles with the table locked in position, or should the table be removed? What about the spindle - any special handling required before transport?
 

bsg

Active member
Here's the lifting info.....as far as the table, lower the work head down on a board on the table or a piece of rubber to keep it from bouncing while going down the road!

K.O. Lifting Instructions.jpg

Kevin
 

michiganbuck

Active member
looks like that model came with scraped-oil ways, and with ball ways. A common recommendation is to remove balls and set hardwood spacers in proper places. Tie or strap the movements so nothing can move or transport in pieces.

I think balls should be set back in the same order as taken out, likely looking at about 20" and 20" of balls for long travel and 16 & 16" of balls for the cross- likely 5/8 or 3/4 balls.. I think it is good to set the wheel head with a wheel down on a block of wood so the verticle feed screw is not hard-pressed at road bumps..in the slack area of the feed nut. Parts have a tendency to get loose and fall off to everything has to be checked for not being secured. Good to wrap the machine in a blanket and then in a tarp of sorts.

Lifting from the solid structure, not lifting under any travel parts or so to bend any hand wheels or shafts.
The machine is top heavy so any attempt to push it will likely tip it over.

fixtures should be wrapped so nothing can fall off and be lost.




http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1738/17405.pdf
 

Illinoyance

Active member
On my KO Lee there is a gap between the base casting and the steel base. I was able to get slings through the gap so I was lifting under the fixed part of the machine.
 

michiganbuck

Active member
Be sure to look over all the whatnots in the seller's shop, you don't want to accidentally miss something.
Things like angle plates can be fudged up to become handy TC grinder fixtures, bars of steel become finger holding bars, .060 to .100 flat stock becomes finger stock.

Good to have a slide stop on your hauling device so the machine will not slide forward at a hard stopping, extra straps can hurt.

Good to use a jack stand under the trailer tail if you intend to slide off the machine.

*Lift straight up and move the trailer, then straight down is the safe way.
 

matt_isserstedt

Moderator
You could confirm by pictures but if those holes go all the way thru, solid or tubular round stock could be inserted both sides and then pick up the bar-ends with the forks, being mindful of tilt (looking at the way they show cable-slings being used thru the same cast holes)

In a pinch I would think it OK to use a couple 2" wide trailer tie-down straps with the double-J hooks in the cast holes. The manual doesn't mention total weight but I'd wag 1200# or less.

If you could pick it up enough to set on a wooden pallet base (2x6 construction) then I think you are home free. Block it to the pallet base and tie it down thru the cast holes.
 

bsg

Active member
You could confirm by pictures but if those holes go all the way thru, solid or tubular round stock could be inserted both sides and then pick up the bar-ends with the forks, being mindful of tilt (looking at the way they show cable-slings being used thru the same cast holes)

In a pinch I would think it OK to use a couple 2" wide trailer tie-down straps with the double-J hooks in the cast holes. The manual doesn't mention total weight but I'd wag 1200# or less.

If you could pick it up enough to set on a wooden pallet base (2x6 construction) then I think you are home free. Block it to the pallet base and tie it down thru the cast holes.

Unfortunately you cannot pass a bar through, IIRC, the column is in the way?

Kevin
 

AndyF

New member
The move went smoothly. They loaded with a fork truck onto 2x6s on the trailer and we picked it off the trailer with a gantry at home. It seems to be in very nice condition and came with a powered work head, a wheel dresser, steady rest, several new wheels, a pile of old wheels, some of the parts diagrams and catalogs from 1972 when their dad bought the grinder and a few other tools. What they couldn't find were the centers, so I'll be looking for some centers
 

michiganbuck

Active member
Good news that you got it home safely.

Are you familiar with cutter sharpening?
Tilt fixtures are handy but constantly changing the angle can be a big waste of time. It is not uncommon to roll the tool a sufficient amount to get clearance. often you want a primary and secondary to raise and lower the tooth rest finger is much quicker than changing a work head angle.

Another clearance angle practice is to angle the cup wheel to the wheel edge towards the tool gives the angle at some point of height so to raise and lower the wheel head can give primary and secondary clearance angles with just a crank of the up/down handwheel.

You might make a few end-angle gauges to hold to your wheel for eyeball reference when holding against your wheel edge.

A good tooth rest finger is desirable..look at the Cincinnati manual for design. (free download)
Another needed finger is one that is attached to your wheel head in front of the wheel, with this you slide the cutter tooth across the running wheel.

It is common that the wheel pressure will push the tooth face enough to change to tool position, so a finger that has a raised step to go over/past thr=e too OD can stabilize the finger spot on the tooth face.

You might make (weldment)a standing V block, Just a V block on a post that can be set on your TC grinder table.
With this, you can hold straight shank mill cutter arbors and various bushings for tool holding. You might even make it with a bore to hold an out-end center, running end sharpening through a bushing with the out-end on a center is often the most accurate method and is a faster setup than holding tools in collets. This device even makes a good drill sharpener with a facet end grind (flat] and then you hand roll the heal for the roll under the straight land at 12*..the out end (tail) just on a 90* bump.

For face mill face you just hold a parallel to eyeball the slight face dish rather than plate checking the cutter.

You want to choose a tool to sharpen so to get least one sharpening setup down pat.

I like to circle mark my diamond cup wheels for grit, I put one circle on the 120, two on the 220 and 3 on the 320, That way you know at a glance what wheel is on the machine. You can run up to 320 dry.. (X) a 500gt dry may fracture some grades of carbide.

All wheels should have a mount-up line so gravity will make them mount the same with each remounting.

for a better finish, one can dress the OD and ID of a cup wheel even though you are not going to grind with that area.

Good to bench grinder try to snag away any steel you might run into with a diamond wheel. Steed is hard on diamond wheels ant the heat can put stress in the steel so to cause carbide to crack when the tool is used.

Cutter and saw teeth are often manufactured off a little (error) so fingering teeth can be off a little. The most accurate cutter is one that is circle ground, and then each tooth brought(ground) to witness land and the just wiped to sharp. a good way is to get the land to as fine as you can (the target) and then pull another .0005 to .002 past that.

A sharpening wheel is best traveling to the edge to avoid carbide chipping or steel burr. but that can be tricky because you may pull the tool away from the finger and so snag the tooth.

Spin /circle grinding you bump (come into the heal first. with the wheel rotating into (toward) the cutting edge.
 








 
Top