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Rivett 1020S lathe for sale $7500

jim rozen

Diamond
Joined
Feb 26, 2004
Location
peekskill, NY
I used to drool over that machine (and 2-3 more of the same) when at Brown in the early 80s. I recall they were painted white and looked like you could eat off them. At the time I had no idea about how legendary they were, but I knew they looked gorgeous.

Getting off-topic, I know. At my workplace the cafeteria employees were not contractors, they were "regular" employees of the Large Blue Company. At a certain time the decision was made to replace that with an outside food service vendor. Being the company it was, the regular employees were found new jobs inside the research building. The main chef (John Lonce) was installed in our special techniques stock room to run that service. Think: tool crib that's extra fancy and has lots of complicated researchy items.

So it happened that one thanksgiving, all the machines (yes, all painted white) were cleaned off, and John, with the help of a number of the toolmakers, produced a thanksgiving dinner that was all laid out on the ways and tables of the shop machines. A lot of the food was cooked at home and brought in, but my understanding is that John got the use of the cafeteria kitchen to do some special things also.

So, yes. Clean enough to eat off of. That was back in the day, here.
 

Spud

Diamond
Joined
Jan 12, 2006
Location
Brookfield, Wisconsin
The others I have seen have been worn or had some other issues. I hate to get rid of it because I know it can’t be replaced. But just don’t have the room for it anymore and it’s not doing me any good in storage.


And that's why I won't sell mine, because I know I will regeret selling it. The odds of triyng to find another one in good condition that doesn't cost several thousands is very low. Right now my Rivett is at a rental storage place, along with my Abene mill. Unlike most rental places, this one has a loading dock and a 6K forklift. I pay $60 a month for both machines and a large commerical water heater.
 

thermite

Diamond
Right now my Rivett is at a rental storage place, along with my Abene mill. Unlike most rental places, this one has a loading dock and a 6K forklift. I pay $60 a month for both machines

Well... acorns for blind hogs are where yah find 'em I guess..

IF.. I'd put..

- the Sheldon shaper, ONE of two 10EE, the 48" X 30" Herman surface plate, the smaller mill, the panto-engraver "nano-mill", only 700 or 800 lbs of my stash of good Cast Iron .. and even 15 or so of 20-plus of the electric motors I keep tripping over.. into such a space?

I could more easily actually use the rest of my s**t?

Even at triple that monthly rate.

I should do some scouting...

I might not be the only Pilgrim here as could gain?

Thanks for that!
 

lucky7

Stainless
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Location
Canada
At the risk of going off the OP’s sale topic again, I’ve wondered why small unit industrial parks are willing to rent a stall to a guy restoring a car, but not to someone who wants a small machine shop space- or overflow as Thermite wants. If I could find a heated/insulated 20x40 ft space locally with 100amp 220v supply, I’d rent- much better than a storage unit!

L7
 

thermite

Diamond
At the risk of going off the OP’s sale topic again, I’ve wondered why small unit industrial parks are willing to rent a stall to a guy restoring a car, but not to someone who wants a small machine shop space- or overflow as Thermite wants. If I could find a heated/insulated 20x40 ft space locally with 100amp 220v supply, I’d rent- much better than a storage unit!

L7

Good LED lanterns exist. I have plenty. So I don't even need LIGHTING, let alone power. Nor even heat, humidity control, nor AC. But those all around us usually ARE both lighted and even "climate controlled".

It's actually very efficient to do the whole "shell" to a "decent" level of warm or cooler that horrible, as they do NOT have constant traffic nor staff working IN them as an office building would have.

And too DAMNED hard for them to compete if not.

Off topic barrier to the OP's sale?

I submit the reverse is true.

Someone who recognizes the value of his Rivett AND the rarity of the condition, but has no space at PRESENT?

Could use temp storage as an intermediate solution.

So they could to go ahead and buy it while they can.

One barrier fewer to sale? "Win Win" all around?

Could was.
 

Carneye

Plastic
Joined
Nov 24, 2015
And that's why I won't sell mine, because I know I will regeret selling it. The odds of triyng to find another one in good condition that doesn't cost several thousands is very low. Right now my Rivett is at a rental storage place, along with my Abene mill. Unlike most rental places, this one has a loading dock and a 6K forklift. I pay $60 a month for both machines and a large commerical water heater.

Believe me, I have had this exact argument with myself for the last few months over and over, lol. The ability of my Rivett to make it appear I know what I am doing is outstanding! Not having to account for machine error makes it a lot easier than machines that have a lot of wear or don’t cut accurate.

But I am paying a good bit more for storage than $60/month. And we don’t know how long we will be renting in Atlanta before I know for sure I’ll be here long term to buy a house. So while I have mixed feelings I don’t THINK I’ll have too many regrets. But I won’t know for a few months after I sell if I regret it or not, lol.
 

thermite

Diamond
Believe me, I have had this exact argument with myself for the last few months over and over, lol. The ability of my Rivett to make it appear I know what I am doing is outstanding! Not having to account for machine error makes it a lot easier than machines that have a lot of wear or don’t cut accurate.
Presuming you are au fait with splitting a thou, routinely or even just +1 or +2, minus 'nuthin is good enuf' AND NOT splitting a tenth?

That happy situation is dead easy to duplicate with any "new" (ish) enough lathe, "super-precision" not required.for dead-average actual taskings.

The real problem is ... that even a very ordinary lathe "new-ish" ENOUGH, ELSE BRAND-NEW... costs a LOT more than $7,500!

I'm serious.

Figure $12 to $20 thousand?

And it will NOT be a super-precision lathe.

And it will NOT hold its value or even gain in value - over the course of half a century, either.

More to it than "Legendary".

Decent lathes cost serious money, regardless.

Now.. if I keep THIS s**t up?

I'll be booking another damned one-way Penske, praticing "Rooooool, tiiiiiiiide ROLL!".... and flying to 'bama to save meself the empty run down..

So I better go cut some damned weeds and see what's interesting for supper and let a YOUNGER man do the HIGHLY favorable math.

The present owner included.
 








 
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