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SB13" Taper Attachment removal

allenhanford

Plastic
Joined
Dec 30, 2021
Picked up a 13" South bend that needs some parts plus there's a taper attachment that I want to get rid of. Looks like I'd need a different chip guard on the cross slide as well as a shorter cross slide lead screw. I know Grizzly bought out SB but that part of the Grizzly site appears to be dead. Where would I get a parts list/diagram?
 

michiganbuck

Diamond
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Location
Mt Clemens, Michigan 48035
Picked up a 13" South bend that needs some parts plus there's a taper attachment that I want to get rid of. Looks like I'd need a different chip guard on the cross slide as well as a shorter cross slide lead screw. I know Grizzly bought out SB but that part of the Grizzly site appears to be dead. Where would I get a parts list/diagram?

I'm surprised that you want to rid that a taper attachment. I always thought they could be handy.
 

Rudd

Stainless
Joined
Jul 30, 2003
Location
savannah, jaw-ja
Screw isn't just shorter, it is non-telescoping. I have all those parts from when I bought a TA and installed it on my non-TA equipped 13.
As above, I cannot imagine why you want to remove it. I make frequent use of mine. I figured out a trick to setting it using a dial indicator on a mag base on the chip guard. Indicate off the round part of the lock handle, which should be snugged just enough to let it slide. If your base point is at or very near the pivot point of the bar, it makes life really easy. Roll the carriage a set number of inches, you will know what the DI reading should be from the taper you want.
It bears checking a couple three times for best results.

All you have to do is loosen the locking handle and the bed clamp, and the lathe acts like there is no TA.
 

MeanMachine1980

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 30, 2017
Screw isn't just shorter, it is non-telescoping. I have all those parts from when I bought a TA and installed it on my non-TA equipped 13.
As above, I cannot imagine why you want to remove it. I make frequent use of mine. I figured out a trick to setting it using a dial indicator on a mag base on the chip guard. Indicate off the round part of the lock handle, which should be snugged just enough to let it slide. If your base point is at or very near the pivot point of the bar, it makes life really easy. Roll the carriage a set number of inches, you will know what the DI reading should be from the taper you want.
It bears checking a couple three times for best results.

All you have to do is loosen the locking handle and the bed clamp, and the lathe acts like there is no TA.

What Rudd said. Your machine is worth a lot more when you go to sell it with the taper attachment installed and working. I had to look long and hard to find the parts to install a taper attachment to my 13. And it wasn't cheap!! I have yet to use it though:)
 

michiganbuck

Diamond
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Location
Mt Clemens, Michigan 48035
A taper can be made by offsetting one's tail, or setting the compound to an angle for a short taper but for a longer taper, the taper attachment is more desirable and easier to set up. Often the TA can be easily set by striking a jo block to within .001 or so. The TA can be set and left at taper for a repeating need perhaps a tool holder shank taper so to be reused as needed, without impairing the normal lathe use.

Can the too-long cross slide lead screw be cut off or ground-off to be shorter?

ref: a taper guide:
Dimensions of Standard Tapers - LittleMachineShop.com
 

Rudd

Stainless
Joined
Jul 30, 2003
Location
savannah, jaw-ja
I found the compound method for short tapers very hard to get accurate. I did not try the tailstock set-over for long tapers. The TA is just so convenient. I needed to make B&S 9 arbors for my horizontal mill, I left it at that setting for a long time till I needed to do something else, and figured out the trick I mentioned above. Easier than using a sine bar.
And as mentioned above, the screw for the TA on a 13 and larger telescopes, while the screw for a non-TA equipped lathe is solid. That telescoping screw is worth a good bit, enough to buy several solid screws.
 

allenhanford

Plastic
Joined
Dec 30, 2021
A guy on another board gave me a link to the parts book.

The taper attachment is only partially installed and there's a cast-iron, gooseneck-looking piece that's broken. I'll likely throw the attachment in a box and it will be someone else's problem after I'm gone.

Nearly all of the things I make in my shop are for my car and motorcycles, stuff like brackets and spacers. They're rarely complicated and typically require measurements that can be done with a ruler.
 

fciron

Stainless
Joined
Oct 14, 2009
Location
Louisville, KY, USA
What no one has explicitly said is that the telescoping lead screw requires the taper attachment to function.

Study the parts diagrams, you’ll see what I mean.
 

allenhanford

Plastic
Joined
Dec 30, 2021
I'm going to try making a shorter version of the male half telescoping screw. Looks like I can just cut a keyway in a piece of 5/8-8 LH acme rod to do it.

I'm willing to risk whatever catastrophe might come because I don't have the taper attachment. My shop is knee-deep in junk "that I might need someday".
 

4GSR

Diamond
Joined
Jan 25, 2005
Location
Victoria, Texas, USA
You don't even need to cut a keyway. Insert the 5/8-8 Acme rod up into the bore of the other piece and drill and ream for a taper pin. Install the pin and file flush. Call it good. Ken

Been a while since I worked on one, I want to say the key can be removed from the bore of the other piece.
 








 
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