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People who publicly proclaim the rules of the hierarchy
enjoy obeying the rules of the hierarchy. They love being
told what to do. If you need be under the control of someone
else to feel secure, you are enjoying your voluntary servitude.
You are not a free man, by your own hand. Sad.
Us free thinkers and lovers of freedom take offense to your
spread of your subservient agendas.
Keep your safety advice
Keep your home owner's association allegiances.
We are grown up men.
We don't need your friendly advice how to conduct ourselves.
Keep it.
Just keep it.
No one cares what you have to say, friend.

-----Doozer
 
People who publicly proclaim the rules of the hierarchy
enjoy obeying the rules of the hierarchy. They love being
told what to do. If you need be under the control of someone
else to feel secure, you are enjoying your voluntary servitude.
You are not a free man, by your own hand. Sad.
Us free thinkers and lovers of freedom take offense to your
spread of your subservient agendas.
Keep your safety advice
Keep your home owner's association allegiances.
We are grown up men.
We don't need your friendly advice how to conduct ourselves.
Keep it.
Just keep it.
No one cares what you have to say, friend.

-----Doozer

What on earth did I miss?!!
 
Well, step 1 is to get the biggest machine that'll fit through door.

At least that's what I did.


I am with the go for it crowd, probably come out cheaper than building a hot rod with the bonus prospect of maybe making back the money. Cars and boats never pay for them selves.
Make parts for your cars and boats, advertise, write off.
 

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"get a machine and such and him being unable to make back what he puts in"
Won't know until he has the machine(s). At least it's not like a guitar or other musical instruments...generally a lathe or mill is too big to gather dust under a bed.
Seriously---provide guidance and support and see where your son takes it.
Always thought this was a sweet set-up....
i'm not SUPER claustrophobic, but that would suffocate me...
 
There are tons of guys making knives out of their garages. They are all on youtube also, thats why people all think they can do it too. I see knives going for $1200-$2500 each, with long waiting lists.

That is enough to get people interested for sure. But who the hell spends that much on a knife? It just cuts things. I can see getting a good blade, but the rest of the knife is like a tattoo to me. It just looks cool, but not necessary. I only use knives to open boxes, I never got into collecting them.
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while not HUMONGOUS, its not small either...
just because you wouldnt buy it, doesnt mean that millions of others wouldnt.
 
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while not HUMONGOUS, its not small either...
just because you wouldnt buy it, doesnt mean that millions of others wouldnt.
Tats. custom knives, legal weed dispensaries, cupcake shops, proxy wars, custom choppers, and others all seem to emerge as the next BIG thing and then after the market gets glutted, novelty wears off.
Some endure....most do not.
 
Making parts is easy.

Turning it into a profitable, rewarding business is the hard part.

If you want to help your son succeed help him understand the business side. Require a real business plan before he can set a machine in your garage.

I would offer any of my kids free rent to start a business in my shop, but I would hammer them with hoops to jump through to ensure they either sink or swim, not just float through an experiment in self employment at my expense.

I mentor a high school kid currently. One of my chiseled in stone requirements for my help and use of my shop is he cannot sell any of the products he is designing if he doesn't have them ready to ship.
 
Making parts is easy.

Turning it into a profitable, rewarding business is the hard part.

If you want to help your son succeed help him understand the business side. Require a real business plan before he can set a machine in your garage.

I would offer any of my kids free rent to start a business in my shop, but I would hammer them with hoops to jump through to ensure they either sink or swim, not just float through an experiment in self employment at my expense.

I mentor a high school kid currently. One of my chiseled in stone requirements for my help and use of my shop is he cannot sell any of the products he is designing if he doesn't have them ready to ship.
Good post with suggestions that may factor in a young person's work ethic for the rest of their life.
Failure and cleaning up the mess after can be a habit that in later life becomes impossible to shed.
 
Rule of thumb is the machine cost is equal to the cost of the tooling and measuring equipment needed to make good use of the machine. A used machine with lots of tooling can be a good deal. For a mill or lathe it is a good idea to pick one with a standard good sized quill. That way if he latter buys a bigger machine the tooling can transfer over.
My little mill/drill is MT3 not r8. If it was r8 it may be worth it to buy a real mill that use r8 tooling. At my age and slight usage not worth it to replace all that stuff.
Bill D
 
Making parts is easy.

Turning it into a profitable, rewarding business is the hard part.

If you want to help your son succeed help him understand the business side. Require a real business plan before he can set a machine in your garage.

I would offer any of my kids free rent to start a business in my shop, but I would hammer them with hoops to jump through to ensure they either sink or swim, not just float through an experiment in self employment at my expense.

I mentor a high school kid currently. One of my chiseled in stone requirements for my help and use of my shop is he cannot sell any of the products he is designing if he doesn't have them ready to ship.
I wish I could like @Garwood 's post 5X, but once will have to do....

With that out of the way, in the most broad and general terms I've gotta say that I'd try to avoid over analyzing your son's endeavor (at least initially). At 20 years old, you're still pretty malleable, and the bigger question might just be to see if he *actually* likes working for himself, and not just the *idea* of working for himself. Once you've answered that, you can probably see if there are particular bits of equipment that are on the short list, and which other items you can pick up once you've started to generate a little revenue.

A little personal background that informs the observations above: my personal business and machining journey began at age 19 in my mother's 300 sq. ft. 2 car garage, building custom bicycle frames, and over time morphed into (first) manual machining (disk drive industry stuff) and (later) CNC machining (job shop work). I *do* wish I had paid more attention to the dollars-and-cents side of things initially, but to be honest, if I'd known what I was getting into, I would have NEVER started the crazy journey in the first place, and would have missed out on what has really been a wonderful ride! Perhaps don't get ahead of yourself (mostly I mean don't take on too much debt), and see where his interests lie and what sorts of opportunities present themselves. It's such a versatile trade and skillset; I think you could do a lot worse than to offer a little nudge initially and then let him figure it out as he goes along.

Keep us posted please!
 
And hey!!

I picked up 3 robodrills at an auction cheap.... Auctions are the way to go. 1800, 1700 and $800 for them 12k with pallet changers you can get into this with industrial grade machines for cheap. I got more into that rotary phase converter than the machine.
There's a screaming deal due a robo on ebay right now too.
 
Edit**

A note on shop condensation:

I prefer a gas heater that takes air from the room for combustion.(edit: a proper ducted exhaust garage heater!!!! Exhaust inside the garage would be a monumental disaster for the equipment/health/life) This will help remove moisture/pull vacuum to bring in fresh air while running.

Get a mist collector!!! For your loung’s health. This will also ass piles of hunidity to the room.
Keeping a circulation fan in and a window open regardless of the temp helps exchange all that moist air and run the heater more often to keep things dry.

I’ll be adding a fresh air exchange unit to my 2 car garage as the humidity when lathe turning lathe quantity has become excessive
 
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Actually......If there are any 2 year degree tech schools where the OP is at best best would be to use their machinery and software.
Someone else posted about be able to productively use Fusion 360 or similar which is very true...because without that skillset your pretty much dead in the water trying to use a modern CNC to it's full capability.
Got to be some tech college near the OPs location.
 
If you need heat in the garage, and you use gas of some type, either natural or propane, make sure it vents to the outside. Do not even think of using a torpedo style heater in there.
Not only are the fumes hard on the lungs, the temperature cycling and combustion products will not be kind to your machines.

When I had a shop in a garage I used a heater that vented through the wall and also used outside air so any combustion was sealed off from the shop. It worked well and I didn't have to worry about any solvent fumes flashing over.
 
My dad encouraged me in whatever I was interested in. When I was a teenager I bought a turret mill from one of his friends and my dad and I hauled it home together and rolled it on pipes into my parents' garage. I ran it off a phase converter jerry-rigged from an old motor.

I wanted a machine just for the heck of it and my dad went along with that. It was fun doing stuff with him and it got me hooked. Only later did I realize that people would pay me to make stuff.

It sounds like your son doesn't have much experience. So, I'd view this as a way for him to gain a valuable skill and interest rather than as a moneymaking venture. Being a hobby also eliminates all the zoning and insurance baloney. But, I'd still make him pay for most of it to make sure he's got some skin in the game.
 
Actually......If there are any 2 year degree tech schools where the OP is at best best would be to use their machinery and software.
Someone else posted about be able to productively use Fusion 360 or similar which is very true...because without that skillset your pretty much dead in the water trying to use a modern CNC to it's full capability.
Got to be some tech college near the OPs location.
All this information is free. Titans of CNC gives it all away free.
Nyccnc is also very informative. There are very little reasons for formal schooling to be a machinist
Fusion 360 had a pile of employees on YouTube showing how to use it.

No excuses to let schooling slow down your education...
 
I would 100% do this! Make him save money or take a loan so he has skin in the game.

Put the air compressor in a sound proof closet (with vents) and run as much electrical as you can.

If your son starts a thread on here of his journey I'm sure there will be people willing to donate used stuff to the cause. People are typically willing to help but only if you're willing to help yourself first. No handouts.
 








 
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