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Slowing a machine down.

fciron

Stainless
Joined
Oct 14, 2009
Location
Louisville, KY, USA
What's wrong with a jackshaft?

A couple pillow blocks in the current motor mount, motor mounted behind or below that. Original step pulley on one end of the jackshaft, 40% reduction from pulleys between jackshaft and motor.

Nothing irreversible, you can swap pulleys to find the ideal speed range fairly cheaply or just buy two more step pulleys and get 16 speeds.
 

Just a Sparky

Hot Rolled
Joined
May 2, 2020
Location
Minnesota
I think a lot of the confusion here stems from the fact that you asked for a multispeed motor in your OP.

If all you want is just a permanent 40% speed reduction with no variability then that's dead simple. Stepping down from a 4 pole to 6 pole motor will do the trick. (1800 RPM vs 1200 RPM synchronous speed.) You'll also get more torque from a slower motor of the same power rating.

Example: NEW WEG D560896 1/2HP 1150RPM INDUCTION MOTOR 115/208-230 VOLT WEG-12-12-56 | eBay

That motor in your video doesn't look original. Is it possible someone did a boneheaded motor swap on the machine at some point and didn't pay any attention to the motor RPMs?
 

Homebrewblob

Stainless
Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Location
Cincinnati
If all you want is just a permanent 40% speed reduction with no variability then stepping down from a 4 pole to 6 pole motor will do the trick. (1800 RPM vs 1200 RPM synchronous speed.) You'll also get more torque from a slower motor of the same power rating.

Is it possible someone did a boneheaded motor swap on the machine at some point and didn't pay attention to the motor RPMs?

I agree, someone most likely put a motor that’s too fast on it.
 

Just a Sparky

Hot Rolled
Joined
May 2, 2020
Location
Minnesota
The speed shown in the youdube vid is about right for lowest speed on a 10" shaper. There is no reason to go any slower.

I was going to say, it seems fairly reasonable for such a small machine. Small shapers simply aren't built for the sorts of slow, heavy cuts that you see people doing on something like a heavy-duty model Cincinnati or G&E.

Small depth of cut and/or small step-over combined with short, somewhat rapid strokes at normal surface speeds are the ticket for these "bite-sized" machines. In fact, that's one of the selling points they used to move them back in the day - they cut faster on smaller work because they have less reciprocating mass traveling a shorter distance and can therefore be geared up faster without walking themselves across the shop floor or wearing prematurely.

You will find that the highest speed setting which seems like warp speed at a 10" stroke is probably about perfect for a short 1" or 2" stroke for squaring up e.g. a 1-2-3 block. 5 thousands step-over doesn't seem like much, but that translates to 9/10 of an inch per minute at 180 strokes per minute.

Shorten the stroke as far as you can safely get away with and then ramp up to the highest stroke rate the machine and/or material are happy with for that particular set-up.
 

Ultradog MN

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 14, 2020
I think a lot of the confusion here stems from the fact that you asked for a multispeed motor in your OP.

If all you want is just a permanent 40% speed reduction with no variability then that's dead simple. Stepping down from a 4 pole to 6 pole motor will do the trick. (1800 RPM vs 1200 RPM synchronous speed.) You'll also get more torque from a slower motor of the same power rating.

Example: NEW WEG D560896 1/2HP 1150RPM INDUCTION MOTOR 115/208-230 VOLT WEG-12-12-56 | eBay

That motor in your video doesn't look original. Is it possible someone did a boneheaded motor swap on the machine at some point and didn't pay any attention to the motor RPMs?

That motor was on it when I bought it and is definately newer so you are very likely correct about it having a slower motor originally. But $400 for a new slower motor. Ouch! Not gonna happen.
At least I have some good ideas now. Thanks to all who replied.
 

thermite

Diamond
That motor was on it when I bought it and is definately newer so you are very likely correct about it having a slower motor originally. But $400 for a new slower motor. Ouch! Not gonna happen.
At least I have some good ideas now. Thanks to all who replied.

Well c'mon.. that's what catalog info turns-up, so it was a good link for making one aware as to what exists as a proper solution.

For what you need to dooo? A motor only has to be functional. Not brand-new.

Or it CAN be "new", "new, old stock", or "new, no box".

World is full of "onesie" motors that have gone surplus to a local need, are no longer in distributor stock AS "A" goods ("legally" new, per FTC ,etc)..

1/2 HP to 3/4 HP?

You but start scouting in earnest, you should be able to find a suitable NEW one for under $150 ... or a decent used or not-really but only BARELY-used one for about $80.

Not a guess. I just checked.

My stable of Reliance "Duty-Master" extreme service? Around $250 each.

That's a tiny fraction of their new MSRP.

Among the "flaws" as to shipping damage that made them so cheap?

- One bustid-off oiler. Easily extracted for a new one out of the drawer.
- One cracked CI fan housing. Fan undamaged, easily fixed. Smooth airflow is good. Ugly is only the patch on the OUTSIDE.

- One dented sheet steel fan housing. Fan undamaged. Easily fixed. Body-hammer work.

- One "not 100% new".. because.... the tiny bit of key-stock wired or masking-taped to the output shaft had gone missing!

Seriously.

BFD. I must have stashed easily forty feet of keystock, Inch & Metric.
One length of every size Fastenal stocks.

Seek and ye shall find...
 








 
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