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Starting a new shop

Hertz

Stainless
Joined
Apr 27, 2009
Location
Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
Good morning all. It's been years since I've been around because of the job I have, but I have accepted a new role starting in July. This job consists of starting up a machine shop. The business is already established, so the machine shop is just extra. Long story short, the owner has a CNC lathe, CNC VMC, a large manual lathe, small tool room lathe, 2 vertical manual mills, 2 large boring mills, and a large CNC boring Mill. He had another machine shop in a different city that he moved local, and has no one to start it. This is where I come in. Just wondering if you guys have any tips before I get started on what I should look for or start with. The machines are just sitting in the shop wrapped up at the moment so no placement has even started. And he has a tonne of tooling and inserts. I'm pretty excited for this opportunity, and I will likely be back here a lot for suggestions, as I used to do in the past, based on the amount of great machinists and owners that are part of this community. Looking forward to suggestions and getting back to my roots. Cheers
 

atex57

Hot Rolled
Joined
Sep 6, 2006
Location
SW Wisconsin
Good morning all. It's been years since I've been around because of the job I have, but I have accepted a new role starting in July. This job consists of starting up a machine shop. The business is already established, so the machine shop is just extra. Long story short, the owner has a CNC lathe, CNC VMC, a large manual lathe, small tool room lathe, 2 vertical manual mills, 2 large boring mills, and a large CNC boring Mill. He had another machine shop in a different city that he moved local, and has no one to start it. This is where I come in. Just wondering if you guys have any tips before I get started on what I should look for or start with. The machines are just sitting in the shop wrapped up at the moment so no placement has even started. And he has a tonne of tooling and inserts. I'm pretty excited for this opportunity, and I will likely be back here a lot for suggestions, as I used to do in the past, based on the amount of great machinists and owners that are part of this community. Looking forward to suggestions and getting back to my roots. Cheers
What is the intention for the machines? Details are needed.
Job shop?
Inhouse repairs?
Production?

Ed.
 

Hertz

Stainless
Joined
Apr 27, 2009
Location
Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
Job shop and in house repairs both.
Right now, there is much unknown, I'm going in with limited information, but what I do know is they have machining requirements that trickle off of the bigger contracts they have, and they currently farm out all machining. His plan is to keep the machining in house. Not sure what other details I could give at this time. Just fishing for general tips.
 

atex57

Hot Rolled
Joined
Sep 6, 2006
Location
SW Wisconsin
Job shop and in house repairs both.
Right now, there is much unknown, I'm going in with limited information, but what I do know is they have machining requirements that trickle off of the bigger contracts they have, and they currently farm out all machining. His plan is to keep the machining in house. Not sure what other details I could give at this time. Just fishing for general tips.
If no high production then floor layout is not as fussy. Mostly make the large machinery accessible to the hoist(s).
Are they going to hire more than you or do you get to be the goat?

Ed.
 

Hertz

Stainless
Joined
Apr 27, 2009
Location
Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
I'll be hiring others in time. There are millrights, welders, and laborers already situated there that will help when needed. I have one machinist that I'll hire right away, as he's going to assist me in getting it running.
 

Radar987

Cast Iron
Joined
Dec 30, 2011
Location
CA
My suggestion would be to keep your current job.

This "opportunity" sounds like a shitshow waiting to happen. Size/make/model of the machines? What does the company even do? What's your experience level?

So many important details missing from your first post. Are you planning to learn on the job? Because this is not the way to do it. If you want to learn, work in an established shop where you can observe more experienced people.
 

Hertz

Stainless
Joined
Apr 27, 2009
Location
Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
Lol. Ok. So here's the details you are referring to.
I have 10+ years in management in machine shops, with 27 years in the field.
The company does mining equipment repair. It has been there for 11 years. He just moved his equipment from another city, that's why it's not set up yet. I have all the details of every machine, I just didn't post it here. I have no problem running the shop, what I'm more curious about was if there were things I should know when laying out and setting it up to start. Sorry if I was unclear.
 

Mtndew

Diamond
Joined
Jun 7, 2012
Location
Michigan
How open is this guy to buying new and good tooling as you need it?
Some shop owners are tightwads and want us machinists to make a Swiss Watch out of a piece of plywood.
 

Bobw

Diamond
Joined
Feb 8, 2005
Location
Hatch, NM Chile capital of the WORLD
I like to make a 1" to 1' scale in plywood or cardboard as it is large enough to see good, move things around until you like it then move the real machines into their spaces
I've used the graph paper and cutouts before.. And the ONE thing I would recommend.. Once you have a layout that you like... Add an extra foot or foot and a half of space between everything.
 

Conrad Hoffman

Titanium
Joined
May 10, 2009
Location
Canandaigua, NY, USA
Draw the layout in the CAD of your choice, or make paper cutouts of everything. Then, most important, cut a disk the size of a large person, plus "personal space". Move this around the paper shop to be sure you have enough space everywhere. Also, make sure machines that eject parts or chips have the danger end pointed in a safe direction. Don't put equipment on the left side of the surface grinder! Angle multiple lathes so a thrown part doesn't hit the next operator in the back of the head. Do you do maintenance? If so, make sure there's enough space around the access panels to access them. Make sure there's room for the rest of the bar going into the lathe. Got a bandsaw? Make sure there's room for the size of the plate you want to cut, plus the extra person holding it.
 

boslab

Titanium
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Location
wales.uk
I fairly know where your work will end up, maintained and R&D, all the difficult things, I’m guessing like me you bite quick when told “it can’t be done, we don’t know how to do this or that, caught me every time, I’m naturally a positive person, don’t like can’t so I was a sucker for the impossible, Still am, I detract, sounds like you have the prime movers all lined up, as well as tooling, a good metrology room or set up can make a massive difference, even CMM isn’t beyond a small shop, very very useful, really good lighting ( the type of person doing the work is likely to be older, older peoples eyes need the light to see properly, ( like me!)
You want cheerful positive people, misery guts just piss over everything whilst they struggle to be right
Good luck, enjoy it while it’s there, life is giving you a new experience without explanation why, keeps you sharp
Mark
 

EPAIII

Diamond
Joined
Nov 23, 2003
Location
Beaumont, TX, USA
I will second that call for good light. Nothing improved my shop as much as when I installed LED lights. And if your machines are not located yet, it is a great time to do this.

The power drops for the machines can also be done at the same time.
 

atex57

Hot Rolled
Joined
Sep 6, 2006
Location
SW Wisconsin
I will second that call for good light. Nothing improved my shop as much as when I installed LED lights. And if your machines are not located yet, it is a great time to do this.

The power drops for the machines can also be done at the same time.
And make sure you can still get to them after the machine is in place. I have a couple lights I wish I hadn't put there.

Ed.
 

neilho

Titanium
Joined
Mar 23, 2006
Location
Vershire, Vermont
Big yes to LED's, so long as no one working in the shop is sensitive to them. (Headaches, etc. Yes, it's a thing.)

It's a PITA to do, but I'd recommend locating the lights after the machines go in. Location and height are way more obvious when the machines are in place.
 








 
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