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Table Riser Best Practices

Djwade

Aluminum
Joined
Sep 23, 2020
Had a quick question regarding table risers that I was hoping to get some input on. I've been doing some digging, but I haven't been able to find anything on this subject (which may be due to not knowing the appropriate terminology).

Some background: I have a 1992 Fanuc Robodrill Drill Mate T-10 that I'm cleaning up and generally learning my way around. As received, the machine was equipped with a riser bolted to the table that the vise was mounted on (see image). The robo has a pretty large minimum nose to table gap, and the previous owner bolted a fairly substantial cast iron plate with some 2-4-6 Blocks as spacers in order to fill that gap. I've been getting things cleaned up and have turned my attention to leveling the machine and how I want to do workholding.

I've acquired toolholders from Maritool with the shortest gage length possible, but that leaves me with the rather significant gap to fill getting up off the table.

My question is, what is the best approach to bring the work holding surface up? I would like to have an actual fixture plate instead of just a single T-slot. I could keep the cast iron plate on and machine in my own threaded and reamed holes, but the mass of the cast iron plate seems less than ideal, given the relatively like table weight capacity. I could remove the cast iron and replace it with something lighter to reduce the momentum of the table during rapids, but it's not obvious to me what the best approach would be. Level/tram the machine in without the plate, then machine it in place? Purchase a ground plate and some precise 2-4-6 blocks (if the current ones aren't matched) and do a similar stack up as there is now?

Any suggestions or guidance would be greatly appreciated.

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LOTT

Cast Iron
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
We use Orange vises as our foundation, and then put pallets on them as needed (or use them as vises, obviously). That's high enough for Speedios, which I would imagine is about the same as your Robodrill at about 7" minimum nose to table.

If that wasn't enough I'd throw them on some 2" blocks of 6061. Orange makes a QD mount that would also work, but we never pull the vises so it would be a waste.
 

Djwade

Aluminum
Joined
Sep 23, 2020
We use Orange vises as our foundation, and then put pallets on them as needed (or use them as vises, obviously). That's high enough for Speedios, which I would imagine is about the same as your Robodrill at about 7" minimum nose to table.

If that wasn't enough I'd throw them on some 2" blocks of 6061. Orange makes a QD mount that would also work, but we never pull the vises so it would be a waste.

Doing some digging, looks like the spindle nose to table on mine seems to be about 9.5”. I’d like to be able to get the cutters below the top of the jaws on the vise, so I would imagine I’d want somewhere around the same 6-7” rise that’s on now, perhaps a little less.

Would switching the 246 blocks and plate out for a large box section tube of aluminum be better? Seems that a solid wall along the x axis would be much more rigid than supporting a heavy plate in 5 points.
 

Pete Deal

Stainless
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Location
Morgantown, WV
I know what I did is not what your after but it's another idea. I have Kurt single vises on one machine (Brothers) and Orange vises on another. With the Kurt vises I did as shown in the photo below. With the Orange vises I didn't have to add any height. I think that on a small mill it's hard to beat the versatility of one or two Orange double vises on your table. They can be single vises, double vises, or a pallet fixture. I bought one of their 12" wide pallets and made a vacuum fixture out of it.




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LOTT

Cast Iron
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
If it were me, I'd avoid using aluminum. It can cause galvanic corrosion issues.

I have a 4th on an aluminum plate, and am hoping the coating I sprayed on there keeps the corrosion at bay. Maybe we can revisit this thread in 7-10 years when I change the setup....

Doing some digging, looks like the spindle nose to table on mine seems to be about 9.5”. I’d like to be able to get the cutters below the top of the jaws on the vise, so I would imagine I’d want somewhere around the same 6-7” rise that’s on now, perhaps a little less.

Would switching the 246 blocks and plate out for a large box section tube of aluminum be better? Seems that a solid wall along the x axis would be much more rigid than supporting a heavy plate in 5 points.

9" is a lot. Not sure tube is a good idea, at that point I'd just leave the plate on there. It's a 30 taper, hogging isn't really the point.
 

Djwade

Aluminum
Joined
Sep 23, 2020
9" is a lot. Not sure tube is a good idea, at that point I'd just leave the plate on there. It's a 30 taper, hogging isn't really the point.

Certainly is an option. I need to sweep the surface and see what it's like, but in the event it's not parallel to the axis travels, would it be best to machine it in place to correct once I'm sure the base saddle is level and square? Doesn't seem like the best idea, but I'm not sure what a better approach would be.
 








 
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