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taft pierce versus gallmeyer and livingston

steelsponge

Aluminum
Joined
Aug 24, 2016
Greetings to all. I have a G and L # 15 which needs a little attention, Couple of parts mostly. A front cover for the grinding wheel which I can make and a schematic of the spindle nut and collar, I will call it, plus some stones to use this little machine. If anybody might have an operators manual and or parts diagram it would be greatly appreciated.

Moving on I am entertaining the Idea of maybe buying a G and L # 25 surface grinder, a pretty good step up from the 15 or looking at a taft pierce surface grinder with the tilting head. The tilting head keeps pulling me back in. The number 25 is a little bigger a larger chuck but I really like the idea of the tilting head. This might be an an apple and orange comparison but still what do you guys think. Prices are fairly the same 1,200 to 1,500 for either. Both are complete. This is also assuming that both are in used but fairly well kept condition. Any and all thought are greatly appreciated. Thank you for reading and commenting, Clyde

PS I'll take a couple of pics. of the 15 soon. it has an interesting retrofit.
 

steelsponge

Aluminum
Joined
Aug 24, 2016
By the way does anyone out there have any manuals for the # 15 gallmeyer and livingston surface grinder? If you do i would appreciate it if you could help me out. thank you, Clyde
 

michiganbuck

Diamond
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Location
Mt Clemens, Michigan 48035
If your 15 is good it is a nice machine. I had the pleasure of using a brand new grinder with a tilting head and because of my experience with solid head machines, I never used the tilt-head. Dressing the wheel bottom to angle seemed quicker than restoring the wheel tram back to square. Parts could be tilted to an angle on a sine table or bar.

Taft's are a great machine if in pristine condition and so easy to manual travel.
Often one can scrape an oil way machine but with a wore out ball way one may need to spend some Bucks.

It is my opinion that you will be lucky to find a useable Taft for $1500. And "it ran good when we pulled it" is taking a big chance that the machine may cost more for repair than you paid for it.

Check the chuck top with a precision straight edge, likely doing that might tell how flat the machine can grind. Run a large flat fine stone on the chuck first, and check near the operator position and far off to the right or left edge for the least used area.
Running an indicator across the chuck top tells little.

Likely there are guys here that own Tilt heads and can tell how that feature was a benefit. Yes, only guys who own tilt heads shouls reply because we all can talk in "what if this or that".
 

steelsponge

Aluminum
Joined
Aug 24, 2016
If your 15 is good it is a nice machine. I had the pleasure of using a brand new grinder with a tilting head and because of my experience with solid head machines, I never used the tilt-head. Dressing the wheel bottom to angle seemed quicker than restoring the wheel tram back to square. Parts could be tilted to an angle on a sine table or bar.

Taft's are a great machine if in pristine condition and so easy to manual travel.
Often one can scrape an oil way machine but with a wore out ball way one may need to spend some Bucks.

It is my opinion that you will be lucky to find a useable Taft for $1500. And "it ran good when we pulled it" is taking a big chance that the machine may cost more for repair than you paid for it.

Check the chuck top with a precision straight edge, likely doing that might tell how flat the machine can grind. Run a large flat fine stone on the chuck first, and check near the operator position and far off to the right or left edge for the least used area.
Running an indicator across the chuck top tells little.

Likely there are guys here that own Tilt heads and can tell how that feature was a benefit. Yes, only guys who own tilt heads shouls reply because we all can talk in "what if this or that".

thanks for your thoughts michiganbuck. I agree with you on the tilting head. a good magnetic sine plate will do the trick. I do have a,, I think small problem though. First off I am new to using a surface grinder and need all the help i can get.

I have measured my spindle twice, maybe 3 times to figure my taper. If i am correct it is not a standard 3 inch per ft taper. The large end of the taper measures 1 inch. The small end of the taper measures as close as i can come to .750 or close. Length of flute is 1.375 or close. using those measurements the taper is 2.172 or 2.18. Does this sound correct and does anybody know just what the taper is on a gallmeyer and livingston number 15. Better yet does anybody have any arbors for a number 15 they would be will ing to sell? I did look on the sopko site. I couldn't find anything for my taper. I did talk to bill and i will be e-mailing him my measurements on Monday.

I'll be putting up some pics. of my grinder on monday if I get the time. Some close ups of my spindle for sure. I need some help guys. I got this little grinder for a song I think it is well worth the time and money to put it in working order. As always thanks for reading and commenting, Clyde
 

michiganbuck

Diamond
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Location
Mt Clemens, Michigan 48035
mast often grinder have 1" or 7/8 at the big end.

Likely you should buy one with 1" and blue it up to feel a fit.
Likely a PM guy will sell you one for a good price.

One huge trick for holding parts on a magnet chuck is to have a bump stop in the Go direction high up on a tall part. You should never be able to push over a set-up with a two fingers push, Good to not sudden crash into the high place of a part.

And you know ring testing, blotters, safety glasses. jig start...ect

OH, be sure your grinder has the right oil where needs to be. The right kind for each place.
 








 
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