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Threading straight in with Hardinge design. No X micro-adjustment available.

rons

Active member
Turn the compound 90 degrees so that the dial is facing you. Both cross feed dial is facing you too. The quick retract level will pull the threading tool
bit out of the cut at 90 degrees. Good for a full profile bit.

What about for a partial profile bit? When the trough of the thread needs to be made wider. What then? There is no more X adjustment, only Y.
 

Billtodd

Active member
You'll have fun trying to get the top-slide as you describe as the two dials will clash.

Why not just set the top-slide to 60 ? The retract will still work and feed can be set with the cross slide , X adjustable by moving both top and cross-slide
 

rons

Active member
I've heard from here and a master machinist that going straight in is ok. I want to try it. I've be doing 29.5 degrees for a long time.

The dial handles on mine will collide. But only one is necessary if the object is to go straight in. If a full profile bit then no problem.
 

Billtodd

Active member
Yes but the only different between flank feed and straight-in is the way you feed , so just feed with the cross-slide , you can leave the top-slide at 60' (30) and the retract will still clear the part .
 

Mark Rand

Active member
Yes, you can still have the topslide offset to get the benefit of the quick retract and use the cross slide for the infeed.

Bit of a design 'feature' when the dials and handles do interfere, but by such a small amount. Maybe a George H. Thomas style offset cross slide dial would be appropriate...
 

thermite

Active member
I've heard from here and a master machinist that going straight in is ok. I want to try it. I've be doing 29.5 degrees for a long time.

The dial handles on mine will collide. But only one is necessary if the object is to go straight in. If a full profile bit then no problem.

Yabut, Ron?

One of the reasons.. perhaps the MAIN reason.. that we DID go "straight in"?

There WAS NO compound slide in place!

And there's your answer. Don't f**k with the angle of the compound.

Remove it.

Straight-in threading benefits GREATLY from a setup stiffer than a wedding-night hard-on.

What you want is a 4-Way big enough to provide enough rise directly off the topslide of the cross.

"I got mine." EVERYTHING that needs no compound is stiffer and less prone to chatter. Turning, boring... everything.

No compound involved, one whole "set" of places to that can move have been removed.
 

rons

Active member
Yes but the only different between flank feed and straight-in is the way you feed , so just feed with the cross-slide , you can leave the top-slide at 60' (30) and the retract will still clear the part .

The retract is moving across the flank (at an angle). Instead of retracting directly out of the groove. Didn't think of this probably due
to conditioning that the retract lever is to be worked with the dial that is behind it.

I did some threading before with some 304 SS probably from Vietnam. The surface was pitted and not smooth when done at 29.5 degrees.
Wonder if straight in would have been better.
 

thermite

Active member
The retract is moving across the flank (at an angle). Instead of retracting directly out of the groove.

I did some threading before with some 304 SS probably from Vietnam. The surface was pitted and not smooth when done at 29.5 degrees.
Wonder if straight in would have been better.

Shite material? No certainty! Otherwise, stiffer is better.

Even so, how you grind your threading tool is 90% or better the determinant of the finish.

Inserted Carbides? Go figure there will be any FEWER than a dozen choices.
I am not he who has the least klew which one(s) are best nor for what material on which machine.

I ain't in any danger of running out of HSS-Cobalt nor Tantung-G, so I don't even have to care.

:)

PS: Retract only matters if you are trying to thread INTO an obstacle such as a shoulder or bottom of a blind hole.

That's foolhardy. Just don't

Instead.. thread AWAY from a(ny) such obstacle?

Go figure there is NO LONGER A NEED of a retract mechanism.

AT ALL.

Eliminating that also improves stiffness.

You want good results, you must apply good methods and tooling according.
 

CalG

Active member
Shite material? No certainty! Otherwise, stiffer is better.

Even so, how you grind your threading tool is 90% or better the determinant of the finish.

Inserted Carbides? Go figure there will be any FEWER than a dozen choices.
I am not he who has the least klew which one(s) are best nor for what material on which machine.

I ain't in any danger of running out of HSS-Cobalt nor Tantung-G, so I don't even have to care.

:)

PS: Retract only matters if you are trying to thread INTO an obstacle such as a shoulder or bottom of a blind hole.

That's foolhardy. Just don't

Instead.. thread AWAY from a(ny) such obstacle?

Go figure there is NO LONGER A NEED of a retract mechanism.

AT ALL.

Eliminating that also improves stiffness.

You want good results, you must apply good methods and tooling according.

Ya But

When I thread out and away, all the threads turn the wrong way.

Dear Abby said it would happen, but I didn't listen. What am I to do

signed

Twisted backwards in Kansas.
 

thermite

Active member
Ya But

When I thread out and away, all the threads turn the wrong way.

Dear Abby said it would happen, but I didn't listen. What am I to do

signed

Twisted backwards in Kansas.

Stand on the other foot?

:)

I thought everybody who had run a lathe in the last 120 years already knew how to do this?

Everybody everywhere I ever worked knew it. JR HS "Industrial Arts" included.

Wher'd yah think *I* learnt it?

Annnnd they are STILL teaching it!

Threading on a manual lathe BEST TECHNIQUE EVER !!!! - YouTube

No need of retractible slides. No need of "ELSR". No need of sh*tn' yer britches nor tongue-biting, either...

Go figure it was never that hard?

Left OR right-hand threads...

What are we missing that has to be re-learned over and over and over and...
 








 
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