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Tool Grinding Block

jam2204055

Plastic
Joined
Sep 3, 2014
Location
Arizona, USA
I am looking for information on a tool we used to use for grinding our HS and brazed carbide cutting tools. I think it was called a tooling block but it has been so long I forgot. It was a block to use to grind angles and the back rakes on our tool bits on a surface grinder. We would like to find a picture or model of one so I can have my students make these in the LAB for an assignment they could also use to grind their own cutting tools. Thanks in advance for all your input!
Jimbo from Gateway Community College Central City in Phoenix.
 
I have seen ange blocks that looked like an angle plate with the verticle (standing) angle of 8* or what, with a couple angle bars ground in to make a 60* threading tool bit, with 8* clearance.
Others with not ground in places but with using adjustanble bars.
I never thought they were a good idea because of having only one primary clearance tool bit clerance.
I did have a job where I was the one-up, few-up guy to make special tool bits and used a tilt angle plate with T-bolt bars to get angles so able to get any angle and compound angle. It would be pretty tricky for students to make a tilt angle plate.

I think stiudents making a t-handle tap wrench that goes on a post held in a lathe tail stock chuck or drill press chuck would be a great project. it would be like a common tap wrench but the but end would have a bore perhaps 1/4 or 5/16 the the chuck held post would fit into so it could have abiut 2 1/2 inches of travel when tapping a screw thread. It would be 3 parts, the body, the T bar, and the nose tightning chuck head...and the post.
Perhaps one of the PM guys with a drawing Ap could draw it up.
Like this but 3" longer at the but end with a bore to go on a post.
*Measuring the sample, draw a print, saw cut, chuck turning, turn a nice 45* and 30* bevel , parting off, turning between centers, drilling, single point threading, knurling, gun bluing, slitting, deburring, grinding the but end with a surface grinder, polishing, heat treat for a useful tool.

Next projest (or first ) might be, make an angle plate that is dead square and one measure to a .0002 size to a .010 micrometer size ( the .010 is if they miss the first try at an inch size of perhape 4" +- .0002" they get a second, third and
4th chance to hit a size of ,010 increments untill they hold one at +- .0002...
 
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Here's what some of the guys used to grind thread tools when I first hired in moons ago, so I made myself a copy. I used this a lot until we talked the bosses into stepping into modern times and got inserted toolholders. I don't think some of the old timers even knew what inserted toolholders were.

The block started out as 2" x 2" x 3". The slot is 29 1/2 degrees from the face that is showing. This gives you thread profile. Set screw on one side to hold the blank in place. The top and bottom angles are about 13 degrees from the sides. This gives you side relief. Grind one side, turn blank over, flop block to the other flat. For an offset tip, keep grinding on one side til you decide that's enough. I usually roughed it on a snag grinder first. Hand grind the top angle.

You could make a block for acme threads if needed, just change the angle of the slot.
 

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Tool bit sharpening blocks are fine/Ok. I have seen a few being used,
But they are limited to not creating proper clearances and rake angles best for each material. Ok perhaps for apprentice level guys/gals in a high school shop class or not.
I make a tool bit for mild steel OD threading with 10* side cutting edge positive rake and back rake of 8*. With this the 60* is compound to the 8* back rake (ballpark) so needs to be calculated or fit to a fish gauge. I have none of the threading problems I often see mentioned here or on hobby tooling sites.
Apprentices and high school students should be taught that one tool bit shape is not proper for all materials.
If you make a perfect 60* included point in a flat top tool bit and then add an 8* back rake the 60* changes perhaps a 1/2 degree on each side.
 
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Perhaps the old "collet-block" fixture and setting gage that South Bend sold with their lathes for "relief-angles" on single point tool grinding. There is someone who posts here, doing a reproduction.
 
I don't think some of the old timers even knew what inserted toolholders were

Don't sell us old guys short -
I , for one know. - It's when you have an Armstrong or OK shaper or planer holder, and insert a small HSS tool bit to use, right? Instead of just putting a great big stick or big 'ole forged HC tool in the lantern all by itself.


See?
:)
 
Don't sell us old guys short -
I , for one know. - It's when you have an Armstrong or OK shaper or planer holder, and insert a small HSS tool bit to use, right? Instead of just putting a great big stick or big 'ole forged HC tool in the lantern all by itself.


See?
:)
Well, I did say some old guys. Back then, we had to make our own toolholders, no quick change holders around. Some made lantern holders, others got fancy with a square block and a threaded base. It was crude but we got the work done. The fanciest machine in the shop was an old Boko mill. Tilting head and a rotary table.
1715206533062.jpeg
 
Having two angle plates one can put a bar on one angle plate set to the tool bit point angle, then clamp the angle plate to another angle plate set/angled at the desired tool bit clearance angle.
For a needed back rake to avoid the compounding you grind the rake first the try the point angle for the small off set to the point angle.

I used to do the like at Cutmore Tool running few-up in special HSS, solid carbide and Tct bits. Some times only 6 pices and often they had to be near dead nuts because they were try out cutters.
 
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I've got a swivel base that came with a Nagoya tool and cutter grinder that I was given, the guy that gave it to me used it for sharpening brazed carbide lathe tools. See below, someone cracked it and welded it back together. The collet holder comes off and the plate with the groove and clamp holes is attached. This has angle adjustments in 2 directions. A simple option would just be a swivel grinding vice that swivels in 2 directions.
IMG_20240509_101517_MP.jpg
 
^ that swivel base looks like a Rockwell Univise, which I believe was intended for lathe tools. (Looks like as in provides some similar functionality, not that it is a Univise or is equivalent.)
 
A T-slot adjustable angle plate with a bar can accommodate making tool bits on a surface grinder.
One just t-bolts a bar at the desired angles and clamps the tool bii to the bar.
With swing and tilt on can get the point angle and clearance, the secomdary can be done by hand with a bench grinder.


 
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I am looking for information on a tool we used to use for grinding our HS and brazed carbide cutting tools. I think it was called a tooling block but it has been so long I forgot. It was a block to use to grind angles and the back rakes on our tool bits on a surface grinder. We would like to find a picture or model of one so I can have my students make these in the LAB for an assignment they could also use to grind their own cutting tools. Thanks in advance for all your input!
Jimbo from Gateway Community College Central City in Phoenix.
Let us know what you go with . It’s a different world of tooling these days . The main set of Machinists out there today may never grind a tool. I do believe short of form tools and the like, I prefer to hand grind lathe bits based mainly on mussel memory and a gage (fish tail) or a small square to check critical things. You should know what a five degree relief looks like by eye as a beginner. Are you looking for a project to teach/utilize precision angle grinding techniques?
 
Here is a pretty neat one. The lighting is to bright. The center tool holder rotates locked by a bolt in the rear. Made by Casey Tools.
 

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Well, I did say some old guys. Back then, we had to make our own toolholders, no quick change holders around. Some made lantern holders, others got fancy with a square block and a threaded base. It was crude but we got the work done. The fanciest machine in the shop was an old Boko mill. Tilting head and a rotary table.
View attachment 438992
Brings back memories, I ran one of those occasionally in a toolroom. Beautiful machine.
 








 
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