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Tree Journeyman 325 Help - Fault Issues/Braking Resistor Overheating

You are still playing in dangerous territory. You NEED to know what the recommended voltage is for the machine and what you are giving it and where! People always talk about this "wild leg" and don't even realize machines rarely have a neutral connection so the 3rd leg to neutral is never used.

However, the 3rd leg to any others is typically a bit higher voltage. If you were already on the edge, that will put you over. That can take out a power supply too. You need to know what you are powering.

It sounds like you need a buck transformer to get in range.
 
You are still playing in dangerous territory. You NEED to know what the recommended voltage is for the machine and what you are giving it and where! People always talk about this "wild leg" and don't even realize machines rarely have a neutral connection so the 3rd leg to neutral is never used.

However, the 3rd leg to any others is typically a bit higher voltage. If you were already on the edge, that will put you over. That can take out a power supply too. You need to know what you are powering.

It sounds like you need a buck transformer to get in range.

Machine calls for 230v AC, 60 hertz, 30 amps.

Per the manual there is a procedure to make some changes for different input voltages.

"For 240v, connect #18 wire to terminal #17"

This has been double checked.

Also, there is a small toggle switch hidden inside the Fanuc spindle drive that switches from 200v to 230v. Manual says to set to 230v.

My voltages are as follows, note these are phase to phase numbers. Do I need to get phase to ground numbers? School me please.

White = artificial 3rd phase

White to Red = 245v
White to Black = 250v
Red to Black = 235v



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I don't think that voltage is an issue. I ran a Tree on 240V with a phase converter for years. The internal transformer is just for the control and servo drives I think. The spindle runs right off the line voltage.
 
A bunch of guess work but..... When you have a buck/boost transformer in the machine, you 'should' check the voltage it is spitting out to ensure you got it right. I have seen people misinterpret schematics before.

Lets just go back to the bare basics. What spindle drive is it specifically? Then look up what 'its' input specs are. if 230V +/-10%, you should be pretty good. Lets get the drive data.

Now..... Just to ask the question, the input connections are L1, L2, L3, G???
 
A bunch of guess work but..... When you have a buck/boost transformer in the machine, you 'should' check the voltage it is spitting out to ensure you got it right. I have seen people misinterpret schematics before.

Lets just go back to the bare basics. What spindle drive is it specifically? Then look up what 'its' input specs are. if 230V +/-10%, you should be pretty good. Lets get the drive data.

Now..... Just to ask the question, the input connections are L1, L2, L3, G???

The spindle drive is a Fanuc A06B-6052-H002

I need to go through and re check my book when I get home, I do believe That it is in fact 230v +/-10%.

Yes, I believe that is correct for the input connections.



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I can clearly see that is 3 phase input to the drive so you can throw a few things out the window regarding single phase input.

Personally, I would retune the converter to get voltages down. You probably won't be able to load the converter too much without appreciable voltage sag but that is the easiest way to troubleshoot your issues.

Unplug caps from A-C and B-C and retest voltages. You should be able to tune to approx 235V for all phases, then fire it up.

I would find out what the prev owner ran for voltage. What is most common is 208V. There is indication the drive may have a switch or jumper for either 200 or 230V operation. If it is set at 200V, that will be a problem and you risk hurting the drive. Setting to 230V could solve the issues but I would personally retune the converter regardless. I have seen countless converters where they are tuned for max load so at smaller loads the balance is way off and you can run into other loads running hot. A coolant pump for instance. 3 phase motors want good voltage balance and will run hotter with imbalance.
 
I can clearly see that is 3 phase input to the drive so you can throw a few things out the window regarding single phase input.

Personally, I would retune the converter to get voltages down. You probably won't be able to load the converter too much without appreciable voltage sag but that is the easiest way to troubleshoot your issues.

Unplug caps from A-C and B-C and retest voltages. You should be able to tune to approx 235V for all phases, then fire it up.

I would find out what the prev owner ran for voltage. What is most common is 208V. There is indication the drive may have a switch or jumper for either 200 or 230V operation. If it is set at 200V, that will be a problem and you risk hurting the drive. Setting to 230V could solve the issues but I would personally retune the converter regardless. I have seen countless converters where they are tuned for max load so at smaller loads the balance is way off and you can run into other loads running hot. A coolant pump for instance. 3 phase motors want good voltage balance and will run hotter with imbalance.

Contacted the previous owner today and he confirmed the power that supplied the machine is close to 210v.

I confirmed yesterday that the jumper switch on the drive is set for 230v.

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Tune the caps on the converter. Why? Because it takes 5 minutes, then you will know.

Great news...pulled jumpers like you suggested and fired up the phase converter to measure voltage. About 230v on all 3 phases. Fired up the machine and ran the spindle at low rpm for a bit, then stopped the spindle to check for signs of heat. Everything looked good. Proceeded to increase spindle speed and run time for about an hour. Prior to this the spindle would run for a few minutes, then the machine would error out.

I think this might have taken care of the issue, thank you!

A bit of confidence grew on me and I wanted to try to mill a circle pocket on a chunk of scrap aluminum. The Delta 20 control has a circle mill option (conversational programming). Per the manual, it is very simple. Here is the list of requested inputs:

X Center X
Y Center Y
Z Depth
W Z Ref
R Radius
D Direction
C Cutter Comp
G G Cycle
K Peck Mill
P Plunge
J Rough
F Feed
L Finish
V Finish Feed Rate

Here are the parameters I entered:

N0

M03-spindle on CW

S1500-spindle rpm

T1-Tells machine I am using Tool 1, which I set zero to the top of the material

N1

X 13.9572 Center X
Y 10.8087 Center Y
Z -.500 Depth
W .500 Z Ref
R 1.00 Radius
D D0 Direction (D0 will cut clockwise on both roughing and finish passes)
C C2 Cutter Comp (C2 will mill to the right side of the profile roughing direction)
G G7 G Cycle
K .050 Peck Mill
P Plunge (Not required)
J Rough (Optional)
F 10 Feed
L Finish (Optional)
V Finish Feed Rate (Defaults to F if blank)

N2

M05-Spindle off

I used an edge finder to find my X & Y centers. To my understanding the W input is the reference plane above my part surface. My plan was to cut a 2.00" diameter circle pocket .50" deep with a .50" end mill. I did set the tool zero on the top surface of the work piece. Anyhow, upon cycle start I received the following fault:

033: Pocket Circle C:0 CDC:0

Unsure what that fault means.

At this point I decided I better not outrun my luck and called it a night. I need to familiarize myself a bit more with programming at the machine.
 
You are stepping into other areas regarding programming and probably need a different thread.

What is the spindle HP and the HP of the converter? If the converter is well oversized, you may be fine with that voltage but you need to check for voltage sag during use. The voltage WILL change with load. That is the issue with rotary converters. You might throw a lot of load on and see the voltage drop too low, in which that can damage the diodes in the drive.

One of the easiest ways to tune things is determine the power of your spindle, then use resistive heaters to simulate the load on the converter and observe the voltage.

Ultimately, you may end up needing a buck transformer to lower everything just a touch.
 
You are stepping into other areas regarding programming and probably need a different thread.

What is the spindle HP and the HP of the converter? If the converter is well oversized, you may be fine with that voltage but you need to check for voltage sag during use. The voltage WILL change with load. That is the issue with rotary converters. You might throw a lot of load on and see the voltage drop too low, in which that can damage the diodes in the drive.

One of the easiest ways to tune things is determine the power of your spindle, then use resistive heaters to simulate the load on the converter and observe the voltage.

Ultimately, you may end up needing a buck transformer to lower everything just a touch.

You are stepping into other areas regarding programming and probably need a different thread.

What is the spindle HP and the HP of the converter? If the converter is well oversized, you may be fine with that voltage but you need to check for voltage sag during use. The voltage WILL change with load. That is the issue with rotary converters. You might throw a lot of load on and see the voltage drop too low, in which that can damage the diodes in the drive.

One of the easiest ways to tune things is determine the power of your spindle, then use resistive heaters to simulate the load on the converter and observe the voltage.

Ultimately, you may end up needing a buck transformer to lower everything just a touch.

Anticipate having to start a new thread for the programming, just thought some people contributing to this thread might know the Dynapath controls/Tree machine programming logic.

Anyhow, the machine spindle has a 5hp motor. The converter is a 15hp.

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You are probably good with that setup. You might observe while in a cut but sounds like you need to get familiar with the machine first and should not be an issue until you are in a 5HP cut.
 








 
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