What's new
What's new

turret lathe tooling?

And for tooling...

Shars has arbors that go from JT to 3/4" shank, that covers drill chucks. I actually us a boring head in mine with a LH boring bar, and a shank adapter from Shars as well. It's really nice to "bore" external diameters.

If you want 5C expanding, these work well and affordable: Breakheart Tool Company Products, 8 pc expanding arbor set, 3 pc expanding arbor set, 4 pc expanding arbor set, 5C Collet Stop Set, 5C Expanding Arbors

Getting ready to make a special tooling block to hold a forming tool on the back side, will need to drill into the bed for rigidity, those little tee slots and cone hold downs won't cut it.

Everything else is made as you go or you deal with ebay.

For a quickchange tool post, you should be able to use a small tee nut, or 2 of them and a block of steel, final height is set by the quick change holder. My quick change has a 1/2" ? height range adjustment. If you are going to get a quick change, get the size for a 9" southbend. I think it's 100 series, the ones for the mini lathes are too small. At which point the mounting block is going to be smaller that stock anyway, I have both the big ones and small ones, the small ones are the right height, but small foot print, the big ones too tall, but right foot print. You would be better off with a block of steel.

No, I will not sell my tooling blocks either, those things are rare and valuable, I hear you play hell trying to find them. :)

Good Luck.
 
Alan used his machine for a while and sold it later. I sent him my tool blocks to copy, not sure what he did for them. Funny mine never moved with the cone pull studs. Maybe a different vendor made mine. I did cut the width on my rear one to make room. Those bases are made of cast iron.
 
Mine is an Enco? I think, same basic manufacturer.

It's kind of a blind tee nut, it's factory, you can tell, you know the cone pulls up the stud and a hidden set screw presses up the cone. Never seen it before on a machine tool. It's ok, makes a machine that you set up once for LIFE. If you've been in a shop long enough you will understand that.

I've been changing mine to a few setups per year type machine, so it needs a little adjust-ability. The other day I ran a years worth of parts in 3 hours, where it would typically take about 2 days. Took all the tooling and put it in a box for next year.

It's a nice setup, not CNC, but not really a manual lathe either. Sort of the 500 piece machine, any less not worth the setup, any more not worth the labor cost. But it has it's place and I like mine.

good Luck
 
jim, the original owner had two of these turret lathes, and he kept all the tooling! I will call ENCO and KBC tomorrow and see if i can buy the tool blocks, and drill chucks, and collets. I have a small Benchmaster mill, maybe i could make some tool blocks with it, but that just takes more time. And i need to get a phase converter and a electrician to wire me some 220. lots to do, i would rather buy tooling and get the machine turning parts.

Just scout ebay.

I equipped a 5/8" shank Enco hex turret for adapting to another lathe with essentially all Hardinge surplus. Then did much the same with the tool blocks for tooling the compound. Two of my many 4-Ways are from Hardinge as well.

3/4" tail turret goods are out there, too. Just now checked. Hardinge, Haas, B&S, Boyar-Schultz and more. No need to go only to the OEM.

You could do a LOT worse than to adapt to the multi-sided Hardinge turret tooling plates for the compound or cross, too. All sorts of ways to tool those up.

Basically, if it could be done at all on a small "production" lathe, Hardinge had more than one way to do it.

Equip to utilize Hardinge "system" goods?

You could be free and clear of having to DIY much of anything - the "rare Mothership" you have essentially rendered "common" and no longer a PITA as to finding goods that Just Fit.

Especially if a tiny "Benchmaster" is the closest imitation you have to a mill and cannot "carve yer own" as easily as those with stouter mills can do!
 
Mine is an Enco? I think, same basic manufacturer.

It's kind of a blind tee nut, it's factory, you can tell, you know the cone pulls up the stud and a hidden set screw presses up the cone. Never seen it before on a machine tool. It's ok, makes a machine that you set up once for LIFE. If you've been in a shop long enough you will understand that.

I've been changing mine to a few setups per year type machine, so it needs a little adjust-ability. The other day I ran a years worth of parts in 3 hours, where it would typically take about 2 days. Took all the tooling and put it in a box for next year.

It's a nice setup, not CNC, but not really a manual lathe either. Sort of the 500 piece machine, any less not worth the setup, any more not worth the labor cost. But it has it's place and I like mine.

good Luck

A person could do 10,000 pcs a week on these things. I know I have done it. Had to get unconventional in the set to beat the mind numbing repetition. One job was making dog point Allen screws in brass. Pushed the 5/16 bars through a SouthBend 9C with a die head in the spindle. Pushed the bars through the tailstock with the tail stock screw removed.

On the turret lathe indexing is time consuming so I used a shop made step drill with the bar stop on the front cross slide and the form tool in the back. Process was stop, form drill, and cut off rinse and repeat. 2000 pcs a day easy, broached them in a little arbor press. The photo shows bar ends with not fully cut of parts for setting up the next time. Bars are stainless run on a screw machine later. Exact same profile as the brass ones run on the hand screw.
SetUpPcs.jpg
And the Lin Haun was purchased new from Enco.
Even with the best set up 10,000 pcs does get mind numbing after a week, that was my limit.

In case you need more Lin Haun inspiration a couple of photos of a slotting set up. Same profile brass shear screw was done but with a reversed form tool and slotted instead of broached. So the turret was not used. Stop form and cut off. When all the parts were formed the set up was changed to slotting. The rig locked the part as the slide was pushed forward into the saw. Once slotted pulling back released then ejected the part, the screw then fell down the ramps into the basket. 3 loose screws are on top of the 2nd photo.
slot1.jpgslot2.jpg
 
I cut my teeth on that little LinHaun turret lathe, good to learn on, I sold it to a guy that was a tattoo artist, he was going to machine his own tattoo machines with it. I replaced that machine with a 1978 Hardinge Dsm-59 turret lathe, and man what a difference! if you haven't used a hardinge turret lathe, and you need a turret lathe, then you should buy a hardinge, a joy to use! and I have done thousands of small parts, just did a 450 part job last week, did a 1,000 part bushing job before that.

Mine is an Enco? I think, same basic manufacturer.

It's kind of a blind tee nut, it's factory, you can tell, you know the cone pulls up the stud and a hidden set screw presses up the cone. Never seen it before on a machine tool. It's ok, makes a machine that you set up once for LIFE. If you've been in a shop long enough you will understand that.

I've been changing mine to a few setups per year type machine, so it needs a little adjust-ability. The other day I ran a years worth of parts in 3 hours, where it would typically take about 2 days. Took all the tooling and put it in a box for next year.

It's a nice setup, not CNC, but not really a manual lathe either. Sort of the 500 piece machine, any less not worth the setup, any more not worth the labor cost. But it has it's place and I like mine.

good Luck
 
Did Hardinge ever make a capstan-wheel turret? Seems all the ones I've seen have been lever actuated. I've tried both on my Logan, and tend to prefer the capstan.

(Not that I need another turret right now, I'm just curious. :D )

Doc.
 
I have a Logan lathe with capstan bed turret and levee turret on the Hardinge, the Hardinge soooooo much better.

Did Hardinge ever make a capstan-wheel turret? Seems all the ones I've seen have been lever actuated. I've tried both on my Logan, and tend to prefer the capstan.

(Not that I need another turret right now, I'm just curious. :D )

Doc.
 
I don't doubt that, but can you say why?

As I said, I tried both on my Logan, and much prefer the capstan. Seemed to me I could get smoother feeds (no power feed, of course) and had a better 'feel' for the cut. Things like an extra 2" of throw didn't hurt either. :D

Again, just curious. Did Hardinge ever make a capstan?

Doc.
 
Didn't mean to offend about the part quantity, but eventually your labor costs outweigh the value CNC provides.

It varies with every job and every shop, but eventually CNC will be cheaper.

When I took over a CNC department, we had a few parts that still went out to an outside vendor. Bob was about 80 when I met him, nice guy, nice little shop and had about 15-20 Brown and Sharpe screw machines, staggered in a way that they were really space efficient. That little shop put food on the table for 40-50 years, put his kids through college. Good honest living. Plus it was a really neat little shop, he made nothing bigger a quarter, sounded like a weird clock factory. He was getting a little too old to continue so we worked with him and started bringing our parts in house one by one.

What took him a month to run on those old machines I can run in a night on a CNC Swiss setup, just the honest brutality of CNC.

I own one of these Turret Lathes , and in a small shop like I own now it works very well, I'm going into my off season and will build all the stock I need for the next year, but in a few years a nice little CNC chucker is on the horizon, I can see it now. And then too, I will say, what used to take a week, I can now do in a day.

Just the march of progress.

Thanks
 
Never seen a capstan turret on a Hardinge. IMO Hardinge is just a better made machine, try one and I bet you will say the same.

I don't doubt that, but can you say why?

As I said, I tried both on my Logan, and much prefer the capstan. Seemed to me I could get smoother feeds (no power feed, of course) and had a better 'feel' for the cut. Things like an extra 2" of throw didn't hurt either. :D

Again, just curious. Did Hardinge ever make a capstan?

Doc.
 
Didn't mean to offend about the part quantity, but eventually your labor costs outweigh the value CNC provides.

-You'll get no argument from me. My turret is basically a 'stepping stone' on my way to a decent CNC setup. It's just that for the moment, I can't easily afford such a thing.

Never seen a capstan turret on a Hardinge. IMO Hardinge is just a better made machine, try one and I bet you will say the same.

-Not debating that, I was just curious. I know Hardinge has made a wide variety of machines over the years, but I'd never seen a capstan one.

Doc.
 
Didn't mean to offend about the part quantity, but eventually your labor costs outweigh the value CNC provides.
No offence taken. 40 years ago all I had was the LH turret lathe and South Bend 9C. Running them my self I did not have to share what little I got for those jobs and was able to buy a punch press and a small single spindle screw machine. Just a stepping stone to having a shop full of machines now.
I know a fellow that ran a billion pc order on a couple of cam operated Swiss machines. He made a fraction of a penny per part, but after the year was over he had a pile of money.
 








 
Back
Top