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W.F & J Barnes 20" drill press auto feed

Michael Samson

Plastic
Joined
May 16, 2016
Hello I was hoping someone could give me some advice on how to disassemble step pulley off shaft, and also I have freed up gearbox and can move by hand when I remove locking handle, but when I reinstall handle it will not slide along shaft. I am at a lost. P.S I am not over tightening mechanism. also I have removed all pins holding pieces in gearbox but cannot disassemble do not want to hammer and force to not damage any parts any assistance would be greatly appreciated
Thank You best regards
Michael Samson
 

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Let's start with the step pulley. Those are always held to the shaft either with a set screw or taper pin. In this case, almost always a set screw. Look for a small hole in one of the steps, and when you find it, probe around in there looking to fit a long hex wrench into a set screw. There also might be one accessible from the end of the shaft. Also, there might be a shaft collar pinned or set screwed to the shaft outboard of the step pulley.

If you have a big arbor press or H-frame hydraulic press, you can support the step sheave with the shaft vertical and press gently on the end of the shaft. Sometimes a set screw will mar the shaft making it hard to remove a part. In this case, you have to use some force to get the part off but then you can stone the burrs off of the shaft and counterbore the area where the set screw bears so it won't ever happen again.
If it feels rigidly attached in the press, take it back out and look again for a taper pin driven sideways through the shaft.

To polish that step sheave, after you get the rust off, put it back on the top shaft (after the shaft has been removed from the drill press) and chuck up the shaft in a lathe. Cover the ways and spin up the sheave and polish it with 240 grit shop cloth. You should be able to get it to nearly a full shine again.
 

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Let's start with the step pulley. Those are always held to the shaft either with a set screw or taper pin. In this case, almost always a set screw. Look for a small hole in one of the steps, and when you find it, probe around in there looking to fit a long hex wrench into a set screw. There also might be one accessible from the end of the shaft. Also, there might be a shaft collar pinned or set screwed to the shaft outboard of the step pulley.

If you have a big arbor press or H-frame hydraulic press, you can support the step sheave with the shaft vertical and press gently on the end of the shaft. Sometimes a set screw will mar the shaft making it hard to remove a part. In this case, you have to use some force to get the part off but then you can stone the burrs off of the shaft and counterbore the area where the set screw bears so it won't ever happen again.
If it feels rigidly attached in the press, take it back out and look again for a taper pin driven sideways through the shaft.

To polish that step sheave, after you get the rust off, put it back on the top shaft (after the shaft has been removed from the drill press) and chuck up the shaft in a lathe. Cover the ways and spin up the sheave and polish it with 240 grit shop cloth. You should be able to get it to nearly a full shine again.
Thank You Sir
Best Regards
 
I checked my own 20" Barnes camelback drill to see how the cone pulley is held on the top horizontal shaft. As I suspected, there is a single square head setscrew. My 20" Barnes drill dates to 1885-1887 (based on the dealer's nameplate). Socket-head screws (aka "Allen" head) did not really come into widespread use until maybe the late 1920's. Square head setscrews were the normal thing to use on flat belt pulleys and the like. However, someone at a later point in time may have had the drill apart for repair (re-pouring the babbitt in the upper shaft bearings was a common thing). They may have removed the cone pulley and collars to use the shaft as a mandrel for the rebabbitting, then reassembled the drill. During that reassembly, they may have used a 'headless' setscrew (socket head setscrew). Otherwise, that drill was built too early to have used socket head setscrews.

The square-head screw is accessed from inside the larges step of the pulley. I did not see a shaft key, having checked both ends of the step cone pulley hub.
There are no shaft collars used to fix the position of the step cone pulley on the shaft.

Since there is no shaft key used, it is most probable that Barnes drilled a dimple into the shaft for the setscrew point to seat in. Given the mass and overall size of the step cone pulley, it is also probable that Barnes finished the pulley's hub bore to a very close fit on the top shaft. I would not be surprised if it were a light shrink fit, achieved by finishing the bore in the pulley a little under the shaft diameter. Heat up the pulley to expand the hub and slide it into place.

To remove the upper step cone pulley if it is not cooperating:
-polish the shaft with emery cloth right up to the hub. This will remove accumulated rust and any burrs on the shaft.
-remove the setscrew
-using an oxyacetylene torch with a smaller brazing tip, put some heat on the pulley hub. The use of a small tip/small flame will put concentrated heat into a localized
area of the hub. Heat a narrow strip of the hub at 12:00, for as far as you can reach into the pulley with your torch (and your torch flame may pop and go out when
used inside the step cone pulley due to a lack of combustion air). The idea is to get just the hub heated and NOT the shaft within it. This should expand just the
hub. You can do the 'spit test' - when your spit sizzles and dances on the heated area of the hub, it's hot enough. Don't laugh: we once paid Timken Roller Bearing
to send a field service engineer to oversee installation of a very large special double roller bearing in a generator. The Timken engineer had heat applied to the
bearing race until his spit sizzled and danced, at which point he directed us to put the race onto the shaft journal. So much for scientific or precise methods and
paying big bucks for it.
-Use some hardwood and a steel hammer to try driving the pulley off the shaft. The cone pulley has a thin hollow section for the larger steps, and this is relatively
fragile. Using a piece of hardwood or a brass drift put against the hub and a steel hammer is the safest way to try to break the hub loose on the shaft and not
endanger the thin hollow portions of the pulley.
-If you are unsuccessful with the above method, reheat the entire hub and shaft to that 'sizzling spit' temperature. Douse liberally with penetrating oil such as Kroil
(WD 40 is not the thing to use). Another thing to try is beeswax. As the shaft and hub cool, the thin penetrating oil or melted beeswax will be drawn into the
interface between hub bore and shaft (or so we hope). As things cool, keep jarring the hub on the shaft using a brass drift and steel hammer. Heat and impact
and a little lubrication may break the bind.
-If you are unsuccessful with either of the above methods, a hydraulic press would be the last resort. Again: that cone pulley is FRAGILE. Machine a piece of round steel bar with a clearance hole for the shaft to drop thru. This round bar must be a bit longer than the distance from the edge of the largest step on the pulley to the face of the hub. When you go to pressing the shaft, the force of the pressing is transferred thru the hub into that round bar and into the press frame. No force is transferred via the pulley steps. If you put the force of a press onto the hollow/larger pulley steps, it is a sure bet you'd bust the pulley.
 
Hello Mr. Michaels (Joe)
I would like to start off by saying Thank You very much for your reply. My drill press has back gears, I finally got back gear cover away from step pulley and low and behold there is a shaft key there, but after a thorough inspection I did see not 2 set screws on the step pulley, after removing them there is a cylindrical shaft that leads down to hubs. I cannot see any screws but it pretty small hole. on the gear end I have removed the pin and applied some heat to collar and back of gear but it will not move. I do not have access to hydraulic press, I only used nap gas so I will try oxy acetylene. I was also curious about power feed as you see in photos, I have removed pin from disk and applied heat but will not let go but I am wondering when I take out lower pin on gear if disk and shaft will come out as one piece minus the gear. I am close to full disassembly as you can see in the photo, but really looking looking forward to getting ready for a new lease on life, full cleaning and new paint. Best Regards
Michael Samson
 

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Heat a narrow strip of the hub at 12:00, for as far as you can reach into the pulley with your torch (and your torch flame may pop and go out when
used inside the step cone pulley due to a lack of combustion air).

Slight disagree. Your torch flame is fed by the oxygen hose and it doesn't matter if there's zero oxygen in the surrounding air. In fact, I have cut a hole in steel plate underwater with an oxyfuel torch.

Besides that, your post has a lot of wise words. Especially about the set screw square head.
 
Hello Gentlemen
I would like to Thank You for your time and wisdom
The Very Best
Best Regards
Michael Samson
P.S I have managed to finally disassemble auto feed mechanism without damage
 








 
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