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What Does "Engine Lathe" Mean?

vincent-hua

Plastic
Joined
Sep 4, 2017
I have heard that it refers to a lathe for working on engines. BS. In reading thru Rose's 1901 Modern Machine Shop Practice, it is plain that to them, a little over a hundred years ago, it meant that the lathe had enough "engine" to it to be "self acting", or power fed as we would say.

John
Hi
Engine lathe, also called manual lathe, conventional lathe, compared with cnc lathe.
 

Lester Bowman

Hot Rolled
Joined
Apr 9, 2011
Location
Modesto california USA
Early steam cylinders were bored using water wheel power just as early cannon were bored. These cannon boring setups took a long time to bore measured in months and fractional metal removable. If water power was elusive some cylinder's were finished by hand using various means to smooth a cast bore. Various means of packing was used to take up the inevitable gaps.
 

michiganbuck

Diamond
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Location
Mt Clemens, Michigan 48035
I was told by an old old timer the engine lathe was a lathe that could produce an engine so had to be screw thread cutting, capable of key and flat machining, boring, and turning tapers.

I know some lathes are called Engine Lathe with not being able to turn tapers..but they do have taper attachment available.

So the notion that the term came from...

QT gvasale post #5: "I heard once that it was the type of lathe James Watt used to build his steam engine" seems logical.

Someone might search to find if the first use of the term "Engine Lathe" came from this time.
James Watt (1736 to 1819)

Just my opinion here like every other opinion.

Next, we might question what is an engine? Could a windmill or a water wheel be called an engine?
what is an engine - Search

Wind engine Definition & Meaning - Merriam-Webster

Is the word "engine" limited to fuel-burning engines only?

*I am just throwing this out for thought / I don't wish to argue about it.
 

trevj

Titanium
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
Interior British Columbia
I was told by an old old timer the engine lathe was a lathe that could produce an engine so had to be screw thread cutting, capable of key and flat machining, boring, and turning tapers.

I know some lathes are called Engine Lathe with not being able to turn tapers..but they do have taper attachment available.

So the notion that the term came from...

QT gvasale post #5: "I heard once that it was the type of lathe James Watt used to build his steam engine" seems logical.

Someone might search to find if the first use of the term "Engine Lathe" came from this time.
James Watt (1736 to 1819)

Just my opinion here like every other opinion.

Next, we might question what is an engine? Could a windmill or a water wheel be called an engine?
what is an engine - Search

Wind engine Definition & Meaning - Merriam-Webster

Is the word "engine" limited to fuel-burning engines only?

*I am just throwing this out for thought / I don't wish to argue about it.

I was taught that an Engine lathe had self feed, whether for screw cutting or otherwise.

The rest of the lathes, without such were "Plain Lathes"

And no, there are many types of engines. Some lift heavy objects, some do complicated mathematical calculations.

Pretty much every conglomeration of parts with an intended purpose, is an 'Engine'.

If you really want to poke at this, define the difference between an Engine, and a Machine! :)
 

JST

Diamond
Joined
Jun 16, 2001
Location
St Louis
That....................... why is it a "dividing engine" and not a "dividing machine"?
 








 
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