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What is the capacity of this small tow motor ? (Pic)

DDoug

Diamond
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Location
NW Pa
Looks like an old Allis Chalmers my friend has. IIRC his capacity plate is missing as well.
 

Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
Friend of mine has had one of those in his shop since the mid 70's.

I would scrap it in a heartbeat and replace with something decent. Maybe when they were new they weren't horrible, but god that thing is a nightmare to use.
 

john.k

Diamond
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Location
Brisbane Qld Australia
Those of congenitally weak wrist find there is no power steering,but I love the little things ...the tiny solid wheels give them lots of capacity without huge weight........lift 2 tons easy.....unfortunately ,they are kinda hard on 4" concrete slabs.
 

wheelieking71

Diamond
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Location
Gilbert, AZ
I'm confident that little beast would easily handle 3k. Especially if one is inclined to push the limits of the engineered safety factor.
My NAMCO is rated for 1900lbs. I have had well over 3000 on it.
3245 stacked 48" deep is where it teeters if I step off, LOL. (I only lift those shenanigans a few inches of the ground) I have even moved a 6k machine with it.
But I bet bigais is right on the money with the numbers.
And if it is rated 3k, in my experience, it will handle more. Probably significantly more with a competent operator. Smart move? maybe not from a legal view.
As mentioned, manual steering, sissy boys need not apply.
 

Bill D

Diamond
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Location
Modesto, CA USA
I do not know how steering works on a forklift. Would it be possible to add electrical power steering as can be done on farm tractors?
Bill D
 

thermite

Diamond
2500 ? 3000 ?
View attachment 346816

Would like one like this for home garage but need at least 3000 capacity

If it is genuinely US Army issue, [1] figure 4,000 lb. as highly probable. They more or less needed to be no less.

The pneumatic-tire (dually) 4,000 "short-mast" Towmotor we used in the mid/late 1960's served on hardpacked DIRT, could get inside of a CONEX container (not as tall as present-day shipping containers) as well as a railcar or semi-trailer, yet the triple-articulated mast had plenty of height.

Super handy and waaaaay more stable for 'yard' work than than the solid-tire "warehouse" models, but not as nimble in tight spaces.

Solids in these small sizes are OK on decent concrete. You'd need REALLY good asphalt to use it outdoors though, warmish weather especially.

Otherwise.. "condition, condition, condition". 1963 is a long time ago, already.


[1] Army Publishing Directorate

Might not be the right one, but all MIL & GSA MHE have published manuals, so ... if the seller can furnish the ID..
 

sealark37

Stainless
Joined
Mar 24, 2010
Location
Davidson NC USA
Made to load and unload rail cars. Not much lifting height, but very strong lifter. Not a problem to steer, as long as steer axle is in good nick.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Titanium
Joined
Jan 31, 2011
Location
BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
I do not know how steering works on a forklift. Would it be possible to add electrical power steering as can be done on farm tractors?
Bill D

Not sure about electrical, but hydraulic yes, and hopefully better than one of my employers had done. It was super twitchy, steering wheel held straight kept the wheels pointed wherever they were, slight turn right/left on the steering wheel got the wheels steering in that direction, if steering wheel was held too long they would go to extreme travel. That was the first forklift I learned to drive, it was used in the shop, major pain to maneuver in tight aisles.
 








 
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