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What's the best technique for using slitting wheels in the surface grinder?

Mark Rand

Diamond
Joined
Jul 9, 2007
Location
UK Rugby Warwickshire
When using 1/16" or similar wheels on a surface grinder for cutting grooves or parting off stock, what's the best way to use them. Is it to use the normal X traverse and increment the down feed by a few thou at a time or to cut much deeper, with a slower/manual X feed?

In the past, I've used non-reinforced aluminium oxide and resin bonded diamond wheels for cutting steel ant tungsten carbide, but I've never been sure what's the best method to use. I do always use coolant.
 
Not a grinding expert, but my gut tells me they should be used with much carefulling. Extremely danger. :D

Seriously, though - my guess is normal traverse speed and incremental downfeed would enable you to keep the heat down better. Hopefully Ol' Buck chimes in and enlightens the lot of us.
 
I disagree with everyone but hey that's just me and my experience. Full depth of cut, no coolant and feed by hand slowly. I've cut thousands of ejector pins using this method and it's not dangerous. I just cut 72 lengths of 316 rolled thread on the tool and cutter grinder using this method without breaking the wheel once.

For those who come across this thread there is another way of cutting using a radial arm drill with a decent spindle speed. We often had to shorten the guide pins on press tool die sets and if you press them in and out they pick up in the soft die set and cause alignment issues. Make a arbour to hold a resin slitting wheel. Lock the column and then feed along the arm with full depth of cut slowly to cut through the guide pins. These were typically about 50mm in diameter so when they cut through they can clamp the wheel so we did put a sheet metal guard in place because nothing beats the feeling of wearing a slitting disc in the nuts.
 
Occasionally I make threaded screws out of copper rod. Made a fixture that would gang about 25 at a time in a straight line. Then grind a simple straight edge slot across the tops. Just kept the mag moving and dropping the slitting wheel fairly aggressively until I obtained the necessary depth. The wheel would break down fairly quick but I could get the desired depth Quickly on this manner.
Hodge
 
I disagree with everyone but hey that's just me and my experience. Full depth of cut, no coolant and feed by hand slowly. I've cut thousands of ejector pins using this method and it's not dangerous. I just cut 72 lengths of 316 rolled thread on the tool and cutter grinder using this method without breaking the wheel once.

For those who come across this thread there is another way of cutting using a radial arm drill with a decent spindle speed. We often had to shorten the guide pins on press tool die sets and if you press them in and out they pick up in the soft die set and cause alignment issues. Make a arbour to hold a resin slitting wheel. Lock the column and then feed along the arm with full depth of cut slowly to cut through the guide pins. These were typically about 50mm in diameter so when they cut through they can clamp the wheel so we did put a sheet metal guard in place because nothing beats the feeling of wearing a slitting disc in the nuts.

You're not really disagreeing...a small pin is not that big of a deal, not much wheel arc in contact. I was thinking he meant bigger stuff.
 
You're not really disagreeing...a small pin is not that big of a deal, not much wheel arc in contact. I was thinking he meant bigger stuff.
50mm isn't particularly small. My thing is I hate cutting pins so I want to finish as quickly as possible. I dislike it so much that when I ran sinker EDM's I had a fixture with a copper wire just for cutting pins while I did something else. When I had a wire EDM available it performed flawlessly as a CNC bandsaw, good thing I wasn't paying for consumables.
 
50mm isn't particularly small. My thing is I hate cutting pins so I want to finish as quickly as possible. I dislike it so much that when I ran sinker EDM's I had a fixture with a copper wire just for cutting pins while I did something else. When I had a wire EDM available it performed flawlessly as a CNC bandsaw, good thing I wasn't paying for consumables.

Yeah at that diameter, I'd spin it. Lot easier on the wheel.
 
Hi Everyone:
In this instance I'm with ???
I too have cut a gazillion ejector pins with a reinforced abrasive cutoff wheel and we routinely cut 3/4" return pins full depth in one shot, feeding the pin into the wheel from left to right. (so conventional cutting not climb cutting)

It stank like Hell and it was dirty as shit and it was noisy but it got the job done.

As soon as I got my wire EDM, I built a pin cutoff fixture for it and wrote a program so I could just input the pin diameters and their length, touch off a reference face and push the green button and walk away.
I didn't give a rat's behind if it cost more...it was just so much more civilized that it was worth it.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 
Love ???'s radial drill idea! Thanks, I'm filing that one away in the ole memory bank. Now I'm trying to remember what it's top RPM is. And what a great place to make such a mess. I don't particularly care either if that coolant gets contaminated with grit.
 
Love ???'s radial drill idea! Thanks, I'm filing that one away in the ole memory bank. Now I'm trying to remember what it's top RPM is. And what a great place to make such a mess. I don't particularly care either if that coolant gets contaminated with grit.
Never used the coolant as it was too messy. From memory the top rpm was around 1800 rpm but it was a large slitting disc once again from memory around 12". The guard is important if you value the family jewels. We used a section of drum with the top and bottom cut out
 
Blotters on both parting wheel sides. Parting wheel don't ring test so fire up and start parting carefully/ stay out of the blow-up direction. Have a way to tighten with not hand-holding the wheel. Come in slow so the Parting wheel can self-dress with the first few passes. .

Just taking a 1/16" non-reinforce wheel out of the box can break them. Hand holding a 1/16 and 1/8th wheel for tightening can crack them
On the machine and running they are tough. Make a shallow pass from the grind side long traveling going toward right to establish a groove in the part. Then you can travel left/right as fast as you wish as long as RPM doesn’t slow very much.
Often, I make down feeds on the right side of the part and grind-side travel through the part, and none or a smaller down feed on the parts left side. Feeding down-feed on the right side can also help you to not grind into the chuck.

*With the part against the bump rail one can flip the part so to part from the other side, so to avoid cutting into the chuck.
Down plunging with the part a little left of center can be good with a smaller part and something on the chuck to stop the fall-off nicking the cfuck.

For cutting /parting carbide put a slip of card paper under the carbide and long travel back and forth so turning the carbide hot so the heat helps part /crack the carbide.

Parting carbide a diamond 1/16 wheel is the berries, dry down feed right throught the part..Dont hand hold the wheel tightening or it may break/crack. for a large.

carbide cut-off creep feed long travel passes from the grind side only..\No down-feed on the cilmb side.

*Good for any cut off the set-up is such that the part will not pinch the wheel .So often one side is free to expand away..not pinch..sometimes one will use a spacer off the bump rail and remove the spacer.

End bumps stops can stop the part from traveling from fources pushing the part to the go direction.

Mark your zero so you can come back if making multipe cuts.

You can set a utility JoBlock to finger feel measure your saved part +-.003 is easy.

Often one can part doen to .030 (or what) and then break off the part to avoid getting close to the chuck.
 
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I can't find the proper cut off wheels here anymore so I've been using 1mm wide angle grinder discs on the tool and cutter grinder with adaptor washers.
 
What I'm getting from the discussion is:- Use either normal traverse and incremental depth or larger depth with manual traverse as fits the job, but don't get the wheel clogged with too much of the circumference in the cut.

For reference, my slitting jobs on the surface grinder have mostly been either slitting 12 gauge steel with unreinforced AlO disks or cutting rounds off 20mm carbide with a diamond disk.
 
What I'm getting from the discussion is:- Use either normal traverse and incremental depth or larger depth with manual traverse as fits the job, but don't get the wheel clogged with too much of the circumference in the cut.

For reference, my slitting jobs on the surface grinder have mostly been either slitting 12 gauge steel with unreinforced AlO disks or cutting rounds off 20mm carbide with a diamond disk.

Yeah, I'd say that's a good assessment.
 
This has been an interesting thread. Thanks for posting it. Keeping Doozer's comment in mind, I have a project I want to try this on. I need to cut some triangular pieces from 2x3" stainless bar stock.
 








 
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