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Whitcomb planer

M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
...... It looks like it has some kind of power feed added on in addition to the indexing, but not sure if that was originally something powered by the shafting, or a shop improvement?

In answer to my own question, catalog states that 30" and bigger plainers were furnished with power elevation that derived it's power from a friction clutch on the idle pulley of the jack-shaft. Looks like they just had it belted to a little gear motor when they added the overhead drive motor to the machine.

On another positive note, while missing the shifting parts, the overhead pulleys and hangers are exactly like the catalog photo's. It's not the "2nd belt" design however. From what I read, it sounds like both set-up's do the same work, the 2nd belt drive is just more efficient and smooth operating.
 
A few years ago i arranged a foundry tour as my contribution for our informal "Friday night machinists" group. Afterwards, Dave came up to the shop and saw my Whitcomb Blaisdell Naturally he just had to get one a little bigger. :)
I also twit him about how fast (slow) he runs his. Since i helped muscle the line shaft up (with the rest of the Friday night group a couple years ago), it's ok.

Now you've got an even bigger one yet!

John O was a great help getting mine set up.

A question on these old Whitcombs: On David's machine it doesn't look like there's any kind of clapper lift action, correct?

That is correct, few older planers (before ww2 as a WAG) had lifters. It is more complex to add a mechanical lifter than it is for a shaper, on which they became common fairly early.

If the head hits anything on the return stroke, will it just swing up on it's own,

Yes. In fact, if your clapper is free and you run the table at a fair clip, the clapper might fly up on the return.
You can put a light spring limiter on it. I found it expedient to put an pneumatic lifter & positive setter on mine.
Be aware that the step-over can be set to happen on either the return stroke, or as the cut stroke begins. Mine used to bounce along on the return stroke, slightly marring the work. So it made sense to have it step on the return stroke, although that was not a complete solution & perhaps inadvisable on a deep cut. But you need a fair bit of over travel to set it to get over fast enough on the cut stroke.

or is there a lift mechanism that's so slight it's not showing in the video?

No. Dave's does not have a lifter, and probably won't add one. Though you never know, if someone contrives a suitable mechanical design.

I see some extra parts on this threads machine that are not on David's, so what would I be looking for? It looks like it has some kind of power feed added on in addition to the indexing, but not sure if that was originally something powered by the shafting, or a shop improvement?

Besides the powered rail lift that you discovered (I was not aware of that option); "yours" also has 2 heads that can work independently/simultaneiously. Mine only has one, so i don't know what those parts look like.

You mention no second-belt drive - does yours have an open gear arrangement on the "other" side, like Dave's?

Dave R is a phenomenal, generous spirited guy who is into all sorts of projects.
I've still never watched a video for more than a few minutes, but i believe that good-hearted yet no-nonsense nature shines through.

smt
 
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M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
A few years ago i arranged a foundry tour as my contribution for our informal "Friday night machinists" group. Afterwards, Dave came up to the shop and saw my Whitcomb Blaisdell Naturally he just had to get one a little bigger. :)
I also twit him about how fast (slow) he runs his. Since i helped muscle the line shaft up (with the rest of the Friday night group a couple years ago), it's ok.

Now you've got an even bigger one yet!

John O was a great help getting mine set up.



That is correct, few older planers (before ww2 as a WAG) had lifters. It is more complex to add a mechanical lifter than it is for a shaper, on which they became common fairly early.



Yes. In fact, if your clapper is free and you run the table at a fair clip, the clapper might fly up on the return.
You can put a light spring limiter on it. I found it expedient to put an pneumatic lifter & positive setter on mine.
Be aware that the step-over can be set to happen on either the return stroke, or as the cut stroke begins. Mine used to bounce along on the return stroke, slightly marring the work. So it made sense to have it step on the return stroke, although that was not a complete solution & perhaps inadvisable on a deep cut. But you need a fair bit of over travel to set it to get over fast enough on the cut stroke.



No. Dave's does not have a lifter, and probably won't add one. Though you never know, if someone contrives a suitable mechanical design.



Besides the powered rail lift that you discovered (I was not aware of that option); "yours" also has 2 heads that can work independently/simultaneiously. Mine only has one, so i don't know what those parts look like.

You mention no second-belt drive - does yours have an open gear arrangement on the "other" side, like Dave's?

Dave R is a phenomenal, generous spirited guy who is into all sorts of projects.
I've still never watched a video for more than a few minutes, but i believe that good-hearted yet non-nonsense nature shines through.

smt

Actually I believe I was mistaken on it lacking the 2nd belt drive, now that I've looked at the design a little more and in a more recent email the current owner said it does have the feature. The above pictures don't show that side of the machine well, but he's going to send some more photos later.

This might actually be a 26"x26" machine with a 10' table too. Waiting for confirmation... but I'd be happier if it was as that SHOULD trim the weight figures slightly.
 
Actually I believe I was mistaken on it lacking the 2nd belt drive, now that I've looked at the design a little more and in a more recent email the current owner said it does have the feature. The above pictures don't show that side of the machine well


Second belt drive:

without lifter
smt_fakecast15.jpg

with pneumatic lifter/setter
smt_airlifter7.jpg

BTW, I got rid of the clippers, and spliced endless belts. It made a positive difference.

smt
 
View at the clapper.
smt_airlifter8.jpg

I rented a couple of those 5,000 lb each lifts that you strap around a machine, jack up a couple inches, and roll it around. It was necessary to use a couple stout come-alongs to let it down the ramp from the trailer, but it wheeled around my shop with just me and a 2 x 4 pry bar to move it. Granted, lighter than yours, but i think the same would work.

DSCN0006.jpg

The reason i think the RR wanted it gone/sold cheapish is that the second belt shaft was sort of seized up. You wouldn't know until trying to run it for more than a couple minutes. I pieced that together from some comments made at the time about who could get it to run, and when it would not run, etc. The bearings are works of art. (John has a catalog cut of them). I had to drive the shaft out, clean it, flush the bearings as much as possible, then fill it with light spindle oil & it has been trouble free since.
 

M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
Thanks for all the pictures and information everyone.

At first I thought that the 2nd belt was an additional belt running up to the jack-shaft, but I see now that it's a shorter belt that's part of the machine and not to-do with the overhead stuff.

I'm hoping to remove the top end of the machine to help split the weight. Does anyone have any experience with how it's put together? On the near side I see four heads where the two castings meet, which I assume are some sort of threaded bolt? Other than that it looks like I'd need to take part of the belt shifter apart and the feed ratchet mechanism, correct? Anything else to watch out for? I want to be prepared with what tools to bring so I'm thinking an assortment of adjustable wrenches and cheater bars, a decent hammer and larger soft punches for the bolts, smaller pin punches, penetrating oil and a propane torch... anything else? If I can I'll leave the drive and bull gear stuff all together and the top side all together. Might take the steel deck for the motor and jackshaft down, but that would just be for ease of handling.

I think if we can split the top end from the bottom, I'll take it and the table as a first trip and then come back for the base at a later date, possibly with another trailer depending how things measure. My "big" trailer is a 12' steel deck tandem axle that's rated up to 7000lbs. I likely have done worse with it unknowingly when we were clearing out our old shop, but one of those questionable loads cost me a set of tires that wore prematurely. Other than that it's a stout little bumper-pull.
 
I'm hoping to remove the top end of the machine to help split the weight. Does anyone have any experience with how it's put together? On the near side I see four heads where the two castings meet, which I assume are some sort of threaded bolt? Other than that it looks like I'd need to take part of the belt shifter apart and the feed ratchet mechanism, correct? Anything else to watch out for? I want to be prepared with what tools to bring so I'm thinking an assortment of adjustable wrenches and cheater bars, a decent hammer and larger soft punches for the bolts, smaller pin punches, penetrating oil and a propane torch... anything else? If I can I'll leave the drive and bull gear stuff all together and the top side all together. Might take the steel deck for the motor and jackshaft down, but that would just be for ease of handling.

I don't quite understand your intention.
It sounds at first like you might be planning to remove the columns (I hope not).
Then, you are concerned about removing the motor & supporting deck ? Which must mean you are (thankfully) planning to leave the columns alone. It's me, but somewhere i'm not clear what you will be removing?

I think you can see i took the motor, pullies, shaft and support structure mostly off, but that was mostly to fit it down the ramp under the door to my shop without unloading it on dirt and pushing over a concrete sill. I agree with taking all that stuff off to make the machine balance better. I hope you do not take the columns down. The effort to do so, and then the effort to ever get them erected perfectly again with the rail synched is something of a job.

Removing the table should not be difficult if you choose to go that route, assuming adequate rigging to handle it - In early daze, i ran my table off the bed a couple times in use before becoming more careful about the location and condition of the shifting linkage, and the dogs. It never hit the floor, but twice it was teetering until i got around behind with a knee under and got enough leverage to shove it back. Point being, mine will slide right out the back if the dog is too far forward, or removed. I never lost it in the reverse direction so don't know how easy it is to pull out the front.

Table on or off, run the rail down as low as it will go. Rail weight combined with the Whitcomb patented cam/wedge locking mechanism castings on the back & 2 sets of tool heads is not a trivial part of the total weight. If you are not familiar with it, John has catalog cuts showing how the clamp works. Mine simply takes a 5/8" round bar in the hole, to toggle it open for moving the rail, or closed for cutting.

(Not meaning to throw this back to John, i have copies of the cuts, too, curtesy of him. :) )

smt

PS: any machine move goes best when there are no damages to persons or property.
That said, be especially careful of the 2nd belt wheels - all aluminum, so somewhat sensitive, and certainly not easily replaceable.
 

M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
I don't quite understand your intention.
It sounds at first like you might be planning to remove the columns (I hope not).
Then, you are concerned about removing the motor & supporting deck ? Which must mean you are (thankfully) planning to leave the columns alone. It's me, but somewhere i'm not clear what you will be removing?

I think you can see i took the motor, pullies, shaft and support structure mostly off, but that was mostly to fit it down the ramp under the door to my shop without unloading it on dirt and pushing over a concrete sill. I agree with taking all that stuff off to make the machine balance better. I hope you do not take the columns down. The effort to do so, and then the effort to ever get them erected perfectly again with the rail synched is something of a job.

Removing the table should not be difficult if you choose to go that route, assuming adequate rigging to handle it - In early daze, i ran my table off the bed a couple times in use before becoming more careful about the location and condition of the shifting linkage, and the dogs. It never hit the floor, but twice it was teetering until i got around behind with a knee under and got enough leverage to shove it back. Point being, mine will slide right out the back if the dog is too far forward, or removed. I never lost it in the reverse direction so don't know how easy it is to pull out the front.

Table on or off, run the rail down as low as it will go. Rail weight combined with the Whitcomb patented cam/wedge locking mechanism castings on the back & 2 sets of tool heads is not a trivial part of the total weight. If you are not familiar with it, John has catalog cuts showing how the clamp works. Mine simply takes a 5/8" round bar in the hole, to toggle it open for moving the rail, or closed for cutting.

(Not meaning to throw this back to John, i have copies of the cuts, too, curtesy of him. :) )

smt

PS: any machine move goes best when there are no damages to persons or property.
That said, be especially careful of the 2nd belt wheels - all aluminum, so somewhat sensitive, and certainly not easily replaceable.
Thanks to everyone for the advise and insight so far.

Yes, I'm hoping to remove the columns, but sounds like that's not a good idea (the motor and it support too, but only to make things easier to handle). Removing the columns would only be beneficial if it brought the base assembly weight down to 7000 lbs or less, 8000 tops, but if it can't do that and is going to cause problems putting the machine back into service, there's no point. I'll just need to get a bigger trailer.

Were the columns shimmed or scraped into geometric alignment after assembly, or what's the risk involved? I don't yet know the actual condition of the machine but am fine if it ends up needing to be refitted (what's ONE more project!!?). It would be a good chance to put my 6' straight edge to work.

I've been around Steve Watkins plainer and have a good idea of the process of lining the bed up and bolting it down, but then again his is a "modern" high-speed hydraulic WW2 machine that could frog-hop out of the shop if allowed too. What provisions are given to secure these old Whitcombs to the ground (cause it doesn't look like much in the photos)? Does the base sit on pads or is it just a solid mass?

Even after I have it in my possession, It'll be at least a year before I can get this plainer permanently on concrete of it's own. Short term it'll go into a container or on gravel out in the tractor shed so it's out of the elements, but long term I'm crunching numbers to build a new outbuilding for my line-drive aspirations (will start a new thread for that eventually). On that note, how thick of a pad will this plainer best sit on? I know a lot of these old line drive machines had plans for pouring custom slabs for them to anchor too, does anything exist for these?
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2006
Location
Manchester, England
I wouldn’t be worried too much about removing the columns. Machines like these were made to come apart. I’ve no experience with planers of that make but over here the columns were keyed and tenoned into position. The columns would normally sit on a lip that would be scraped for alignment first. If you can borrow a box level it will be very helpful in making sure they are in vertical alignment. A long straight edge across the bed onto the vertical ways and some cigarette papers will tell you if they are parallel to each other.

I always checked out the alignments before taking the machine apart. That way you know wether you need to get the scraper out before you put the machine back together again. Nothing is more annoying than putting a machine back together again and then realising it has to come apart all over again.

Planers are quite forgiving machines, especially of the columns being miss aligned in the front vertical plane. If you think about it what difference does it make to a single point tool if the columns, and therefore the cross rail and clapper box is leaning forward a few thousands ? Plano-mill alignments are another story entirely. Converting a planer into a Plano-mill can become a really big job.

When you’re taking the cross rail off I used to bring it down onto some good timbers on the table, then wind the table away by hand, bringing the cross rail away from the columns. It’s a safe and secure method. Do it in reverse to refit the cross rail. On machines where the table couldn’t be moved I’ve skated the cross rail away on the table top with machinery movers skates.

I would have thought a couple of feet of concrete would be ample for that machine. On biggish planers ( not monsters ) the foundations went from say 2ft or 3ft at either end of the bed tapering down to about 8ft or 10ft under the columns. The ones with the side boxes and the associated balance weights needed holes in the foundation that were deep enough to receive the balance weights when the side boxes were at their highest.

As to anchoring it. A couple clamps fastened to the ground at either end should stop it shunting.

It’s a dying art, you don’t get this stuff in books anymore

Regards Tyrone.
 

M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
Thanks, that all makes sense. The current owner thinks we'll need to take the columns down just for his lift to be able to move it, so we might have to go that route even if I bring a bigger trailer.
....

I would have thought a couple of feet of concrete would be ample for that machine. On biggish planers ( not monsters ) the foundations went from say 2ft or 3ft at either end of the bed tapering down to about 8ft or 10ft under the columns. The ones with the side boxes and the associated balance weights needed holes in the foundation that deep to receive the balance weights when the side boxes were at their highest.

As to anchoring it. A couple clamps fastened to the ground at either end should stop it shunting.

Regards Tyrone.
I was thinking closer to 6" thick, so glad I asked! lol. I'm guessing on these plainers that the thickness is more for stability/accuracy than concern of it breaking-up the floor? The angle plate idea would be easy to do. With the width and length of the machine, plus a foot or two on the ends, I'm imagining the machine resting on a large rectangular block in the floor (rebar reinforced) and just anchoring the floor clamps to that with some 1/2" expanding anchors? Or I might even pour the foundation with the clamps in place and welded to the rebar. I don't see myself replacing this machine with a bigger/newer machine in the future, so the minimum requirements for the machine to operate as intended long term are all I need.

My current plans for the building are really just giving room for my current machines, but I'm building it in such a way that WHEN I find more machines, I can knock down a wall, pour more floor, and build the roof and walls out a little more. Part of my inspiration for this shop is that so many of these old line-shaft machines are entirely built-in to the shop from the foundation to the rafters, so rather than building a generic space to set anything on, I'm going to build a structure tailored to the shop.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2006
Location
Manchester, England
Thanks, that all makes sense. The current owner thinks we'll need to take the columns down just for his lift to be able to move it, so we might have to go that route even if I bring a bigger trailer.
I was thinking closer to 6" thick, so glad I asked! lol. I'm guessing on these plainers that the thickness is more for stability/accuracy than concern of it breaking-up the floor? The angle plate idea would be easy to do. With the width and length of the machine, plus a foot or two on the ends, I'm imagining the machine resting on a large rectangular block in the floor (rebar reinforced) and just anchoring the floor clamps to that with some 1/2" expanding anchors? Or I might even pour the foundation with the clamps in place and welded to the rebar. I don't see myself replacing this machine with a bigger/newer machine in the future, so the minimum requirements for the machine to operate as intended long term are all I need.

My current plans for the building are really just giving room for my current machines, but I'm building it in such a way that WHEN I find more machines, I can knock down a wall, pour more floor, and build the roof and walls out a little more. Part of my inspiration for this shop is that so many of these old line-shaft machines are entirely built-in to the shop from the foundation to the rafters, so rather than building a generic space to set anything on, I'm going to build a structure tailored to the shop.

Given the fact that planers take up a lot of room it was common practice to set the cross rail position right on final point that the overhead crane could reach. So you had what were really “ sheds “ that were built onto the end or side of the main building that covered the rear end of the planer. I’ve put a few through a hole in the wall when the factory had several bays.

Anything to save valuable shop floor space.

Regards Tyrone.
 
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I have to defer to Tyrone about taking it down and re-erecting it.
He was paid for all due effort to do such.
My primary objection is still: taking it apart increases by several mulitples the odds against prompt re-conditioning.

That machine is not terribly big.
If you are using it "just because" while still having useful work to put on it, it need not be complex to set up, clean up, and use. These things are not thumping, like a lineshaft or steam hammer. They vaguely consider scootching back and forth if you wind the table up past maybe 50 fpm or so.

Mine is on a crumbly old dairy barn floor, probably around 4" thick. It is shimmed on white oak blocks, welll oiled by the constant loss lube system from the table ways. I run it up to 90 sfm. It does not shift appreciably, though i should probably re-level it to check. Mine, which is very close to yours in style, has a bolt pad on each side, at each end. (4 places) I can't recall if there are any bolt holes under the columns; but that area should certainly be supported. Mine is not bolted down. I can imagine making the effort to map how much it rocks end to end based on where the table is, but that is not going to be the first barrier to doing good work. For instance many machines with clappers are limited by the tool control in a sloppy clapper. I bet a lot of the Whitcombs went into dirt floored places, or places with concrete about like mine, when they were first in service. Do keep it shimmed out of twist. But the full bed models are pretty stout end to end.

Mines been here since 2009 & I was final shimming & making test cuts on it a day or 2 after it arrived. I dreamed from the begining of having my neighbor excavate a pad and me pour a few feet of reinforced concrete. Then make a cradle to slide the table out one end, turn it over, and scrape it and the bed. 13 years later & a year shy of 70, i still keep that as a hopeful vision. OTOH, i've been able to go out, turn it on, and run it for productive, accurate work, any day the fancy strikes in the intervening time.

smt
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2006
Location
Manchester, England
The thing about old planers is they are pretty simple machines. Especially if there aren’t any side box alignments to bother about. If all you’re going to be doing is planing the top of components the only really critical factor is the alignment of the cross rail to the table top. Most machines have a basic coupling style device up top somewhere that enables you to set the cross rail parallel to the the table top. If you then take a light skim of the table with a flat nosed tool you’re good to go.

My intention was to illustrate that taking a machine like that apart I’d no big deal. It’s nothing to be worried about or scared of. Most things that you’ve never done before can appear to be daunting. Once you’ve done them they’re no longer a mystery and you wonder what the problem was In the first place.

I always found the hard bit about creating the foundations was breaking up and digging out the existing concrete floor. Once you’d done that the concreting was just a question of how much you wanted to put in. 6”, 12”, 2’, 10’ it didn’t really matter. You just drove the “ Readi - Mix “ into the building and started pouring. If you haven’t got an existing concrete floor it should be easy.
Anyway it is what is. No doubt the OP will do whatever he feels is best for him.

Regards Tyrone
 
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M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
Thanks again for the replies. Without factory specifications, it helps to understand the limits of what the machine needs at minimum, and what would be ideal. Beings as I'll be pouring a floor and foundation for it myself from scratch, I can do whatever I want, but I'd rather not waste time and concrete on a slab that'll never be utilized, and I also don't want to have issues with it holding position or breaking the floor if I push it to it's limits either. I won't be pouring any concrete until the machine is here at any rate.

At bare minimum, the machine's going to need new belts before it cuts anything. If it goes in a container (solid floor), the overhead motor and jack-shaft will need to come down to make head-room. If it goes in the tractor shed (dirt/gravel floor), I might have space to fully assemble it (8' at one eave that goes up to 10' on the other side), but I'll need about a 200' extension cord to power it up (or I could mount a flat belt pulley on my Ford 8N). That'll be the most likely situation once it arrives on my side of the map, so yes I could have it operating in the short term, but realistically I'm not expecting to use it until it's on it's own floor.
 
Tyrone - I spent my life in construction and very little about foundations and basic concrete & re-bar is a mystery to me. Certainly not the doing of it. :) Actually did a fair amount of concrete breaking and pier excavation and filling on a small scale over the past winter, when not skiing.

Nor is, particularly tearing down and erecting most machines. OTOH i will not bore you, nor re-pain myself with an account of some quite wonderful machines that were perfectly capable - until i took them apart to get them home, and stored them. Some inside, some outside, under plastic with tarps on top.... for the first few years.... Not that i am cured. 2 neighbors still have sections of their barns (down from 3, one guy passed on) with my machines and such in them.

OTOH when i have made a priority of getting a machine into the shop, into service and functioning, it seems i find a way to keep using it and improving it, and finding ever more interesting and productive ways to keep using & improving it.

The issue is that there are so many interesting things to do in life, that it is way too easy to find a decade passed before you get back to a project left half-undone, if you don't do it now. Almost every week brings another opportunity or distraction in some direction. You may come back around to an old project, or it might be in your estate sale. If it's important to me, i try not to let there be a lapse in the proceedings anymore. As far as work on my planer, it runs and runs well enough to do quite good work for most of my purposes. It was not bought as a toy, i realized after scraping several large-ish machine tables and elements too large for the mill or 30" surface grinder here, that it was stupid to keep doing that without a planer. My point about fantasies is to not let ideas of perfection prevent you from using what you can and making it a productive asset that does not cost time to use. The reason my planer improvement fantasies are that, is that as i look around and wonder how long i'll be in fortunate good health, activities i neglected or put off for years, decades even, seem far more important for time allocation these days while health does permit. Skiing as much as possible in the winter, flying as much as affordable in the summer, working on my own house & projects for a change.... Life's a continuum on the matrix of time, money, and health. Allocate fortuitously.

smt
 
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M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
It has begun!!!

Made the first load this morning. Dave's a cool guy with an awesome shop. Most of his machines, plainer included, all came out of the same 80+ year old shop in Greenville Texas. It was an old railroad machine shop that in recent years became a welding/fabrication business and Dave bought a big chunk of the old machine shop equipment and tools and did a great job fixing it all up. The welding guys had started converting the plainer table into a welding table, but Dave thankfully saved it. The plainer was the last piece to fix up but just didn't fit the available real-estate/usefulness ratio. When I got in touch with Dave, he had started dismantling it to head to the scrap yard, but hadn't yet, so this plainer has had two close calls now!

We were having too much "fun" for me to get any pictures there, but I got the table, overhead motor stand, motor, and jack shaft, and a bucket worth of small stuff. The rest will come on another trip. I think I'm settled not to take the columns down as it's going to be too much for a "field" job with limited time, so the rest of the machine will come on a bigger trailer.

So far, there are some minor cracks and bends to repair, and some past repairs that need better attention, but I think the only missing parts are the tables trip dogs, and the main gear rack that would be bolted under the table (removed and lost during the welding table fiasco). If it's even available off the shelf, I think.the gearrack would be expensive to buy, but I don't think it would be hard to make from scratch as long as I can get the right specs.

I confirmed some measurements too. The table is 10' long and 26" wide with 8' of T-slot space. 30" wide between columns, and the bed casting is 12' long. Not certain yet how much the table would overhang the bed at the extreme of travel, but with the above measurements I'm thinking 4' extra front and back would be safe before it starts to teeter. I didn't realize how narrow the bed is too (in a good way, thinking of saving space), at around 20". This is all good as it'll fit nicely in the tractor shed.

It does indeed have the 2nd-belt drive, however the driving pulley is an old laminated paper pulley that has decomposed and will need to be replaced.

Pictures coming.
 
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M.B. Naegle

Titanium
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
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Here's the table and it's missing gear rack. The ways look serviceable, but have a hefty coat of surface rust on them that looks like it'll razor-off easily. There are a few places that have some gaulding and lines worn in, but it doesn't look like it would be enough to seriously compromise the machines accuracy. I think the main goal will be cleaning everything up and ensuring that the oiling mechanisms are all working as they should. The bed has some discs that roll oil onto the table's V-ways via friction, but they're pretty pitted and rusty, so making new one's will likely be in order. They look easy though as they're a couple of beveled flat plates on a spindle. The table also came with a pile of T-nuts and locating pins, so it's a good start on furniture.
 








 
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