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Whiton Machine Co. 3-jaw Chuck

bug_hunter

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 17, 2020
Location
SE Wisconsin
Hey Guys,

Considering a 6-inch Whiton 3-Jaw for my SB-9c. The chuck has 2-piece jaws. What are the pros and cons of the 2-piece jaws? Can I expect better accuracy with the 2-piece over the reversable jaws? Thoughts on if a good-looking Whiton is worth the expense over a less expensive new?

Thanks,

Greg
 
Unless you like the antiqueness of a Whiton chuck, I think you be better off buying one of the many new chucks available out there with two-piece jaws. Depending on the age of the Whiton chuck, it may not have two piece jaws that will match up to the standard for 2-piece jaws used today. Regardless, that Whiton chuck is old enough to be worn out, too.
 
If accuracy is your goal, I'd look for a 4 jaw chuck, you can dial the work in under .001". Generally can't do that with a 3 jaw.
Accuracy is the objective. I already have a four-jaw. Guess I should just resolve to taking the few extra minutes to use it and dial it in. I'm pretty sure, the more your run through the dial-in process, the quicker/easier it gets.
 
Accuracy is the objective. I already have a four-jaw. Guess I should just resolve to taking the few extra minutes to use it and dial it in. I'm pretty sure, the more your run through the dial-in process, the quicker/easier it gets.
When you get in the habit, it becomes second nature. I keep a mag base dial indicator set up for the sole purpose of zeroing work in.

A 3 jaw is more handy if you are polishing with emery cloth, or a bunch of part off's where you don't really need to be dialed in. But even in those cases, I find it more work to swap the chuck, than to just get it centered with a 4 jaw.
 
Thanks a brunch for the thoughts. I'll just move forward with the four-jaw for while and save myself a few hundred $'s for now.

Have a great weekend!
 
My go-to is a 3 or 6 jaw chuck with the adjust a true feature. It is very fast to clamp round parts within several thou, than it can be dialed in very much like a 4 jaw if higher precision is required. The 6 jaws are good for thin walled tubing.
I do use the 4 jaw independent chuck for odd shaped parts but it is quite heavy and slower for round stock. Probably have not used it enough to get really fast with it.
 
My go-to is a 3 or 6 jaw chuck with the adjust a true feature.
My first thought was a adjust-tru type, three-jaw, but it is hard to justify the cost for a weekend hobbyist. Makes a lot of sense for the production guys or even one-off for sale guy, but a little rough on the once every couple weeks for personal use guy.
 








 
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