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Who to bank with? and whats a good location for investment in the US?

Rather that deal with 300+ million opinions on where, bring some science to it. The market (industrial real estate) is too big for one person to completely get it in detail, so start using broad data sets. Here's a research report for example. Read a set of them over a time period for a sense where is stable and strong. Better to be in a big market than a small, better to be in low vacancy than and so on. Look for economic diversity and growth - it is companies needing space that make the market. Also be aware the rest of market is clued in on this - a better market will usually have low yield

http://www.colliers.com/-/media/fil...arch-reports/q3-2016-us-industrial-report.pdf

Incidentally while Canada is obviously a lot small than the US, so much is concentrated in the GTA its a market about the size of Chicago in terms of industrial square footage. Very good market to invest in, but for a few months of the year fails on the no freezing of asses criteria
 
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Incidentally while Canada is obviously a lot small than the US, so much is concentrated in the GTA its a market about the size of Chicago in terms of industrial square footage. Very good market to invest in, but for a few months of the year fails on the no freezing of asses criteria

Not sure if you're suggesting Canada as a possibility, but I can say that no Aussie in their right mind would *ever* live somewhere it gets to -40C in winter. That rules out pretty much everywhere except Vancouver.

PDW
 
What I get from the OP is that he's looking for a place to acquire a leasable industrial property without having to jump through too many financing hoops. All I can say is, whatever country you're looking in, you're searching for the Holy Grail. Every single amenity comes with a price, either in direct cost or in offsetting conditions. In Wyoming we have wind and cold winters. To me those downsides are more than canceled by the fact that we have no state income tax. Surely there are sets of conditions in Australia that would conform to his needs.

Best thing is hands-on research. Visit places and talk to local business owners. Subscribe to their local newspaper for six months and read between the lines, that'll tell you most of what you want to know right there (when a fistfight in the line at a convenience store made the paper here I knew it would be a lower-crime area than Washington, DC).
 
Really general terms at the moment, but which bank is the best to deal with? has the best ethics and possibly good to have a loan with?
Givens must be able to inter country transfers electronically, good card access for starters.

As the US is quite large in the future i would be looking to buy a retail or semi industrial / industrial premises as a starter to lease out as a foothold in into the country,Could be a fixer upper, there must be demand obviously and location must be good, maybe even a move to US if all goes well.

Kind of like your freedoms will see if the opinion matches reality...will do a reconnaissance trip once i narrow a few places down.

I like a mild climate not so tropical so florida may not appeal, nor does desert surroundings grab me.

Prefer not to freeze my backside off either.

Any suggestions is appreciated Thankyou.

Someone mentioned North Carolina....here is a title from another forum:
Ku Klux Klan Members Drive Through North Carolina Town to Celebrate Trump Victory
 
Not sure if you're suggesting Canada as a possibility, but I can say that no Aussie in their right mind would *ever* live somewhere it gets to -40C in winter. That rules out pretty much everywhere except Vancouver.

PDW

perhaps.....but its a big place. I get to the North to visit customers and there are places that are -40C in the dead of winter, or worse. Think Ft Mac or Timmins....but they're a long plane ride away. The pump themselves up with the delusion its a dry cold....really, its just bloody horrible. Not the case in Toronto, avg Jan temp -3C and on average there are only 22 days a year less than -10C. Hot summers. Still, I get its not the outback, and there's days when it just sucks with a windy damp cold cutting through you. That's why fireplaces and scotch were invented imo. Vancouver is more moderate, but the bloody rain is horrible. Its trade off .....the developed and stable industrial areas aren't always the warmest.

I mentioned because it is a great investment spot for industrial real estate. The industrial base rivals that the US's largest and its a diversified fairly stable economy. We've an idiot for a leader nationally, but enough of our wealth comes rocks and trees that I doubt even he can completely F it up.
 
Take it Maryland is swampland that has been drained ?

Also you said "How about Washington" OWTTE. Which one, Washington state (Pacific NW) or Washington, DC (mid Atlantic/east coast) ?

Being a suburb of Washington, DC and having the rejuvenated city and port of Baltimore, MD never ends. I grew up there, still have connections and property there, still work in DC from time to time, & occasionally Baltimore. It sure has changed, and continues to grow economically.

When I was a kid in the 50's/60's and started work life in the early 70's, outside of Baltimore and Hagerstown (Mack Truck, Pangborn, Fairchild Hiller, etc) it was a relatively sleepy rural farming or fishing stare, and DC was pretty sleepy and quite small as well. Going forward it will probably not stop growing until it is paved over. They have done all but outlaw dairy farms (made it too difficult and expensive) due to contamination of the Chesapeake. Not that farms don't still exist. However to live well in what used to be a low income rural state where people did not actually know they were poor, now takes a pretty healthy income. The freedoms are also eroding. When I was in grade school and even in HS, guys used to keep long guns and certainly ammo in their school lockers either because they went hunting in the morning before school, or they wanted a quick start before sun-down on the way home. Try that now.

Economically, it is a great state, getting crowded, and I don't like the swelter & overcast haze of summers there but glad to still have connections, and have to admit some elements of missing it.

I really like the climate and laid back attitude of upstate NY, not to mention low population density, and the lakes everywhere. But it gets colder than you like for a few weeks in the winter (for a few months in some areas) and probably does not have the real estate you are looking for except around maybe Rochester, possibly Albany, certainly Ithaca, and NYC .
smt
 
I'm surprised no one has mentioned Tennessee. Now, admittedly, I don't have any personal experience with Tennessee, but remember the late Frank Sperl, who used to post as "Mitty"? Frank had nothing but good things to say about the help he could get from state offices, including the governor's office. Search for his posts; they are a fun read, anyway.

Dennis
 
Just to let you know out here in Melbourne their are areas you go to and they could be good, yet in the same town there are areas that just are no good, its local demand.
As to if there are local issues that are in the US towns being of a similar nature i suspect this may be the case.

However it will take a while to get organised here and the zone is larger at the moment just looking at towns / cities, US Map is on its way, need to do climate zones, local resources whats around what industry is currently there, what growth it has.
Some growth makes it easier to say you can lease something out, negative growth means that it is harder or unlikely.
Then i can look at say north of the river, suburbs etc.

It i think would take 15 years to establish some firm base in the US to build upon,( investment pays off over years) let alone time to get there.

I subscribed to all the consulate info on Tax etc Because you threw out the brits you have your own laws and tax system which will have to be learnt to a point, then a tax advisor takes over.
You cannot keep running to a advisor every 5 minutes though so some knowledge to get you there is needed.

Trying the KISS principle at the moment but details on how things work need to be learnt.

Over here we sell realestate by auction 99% of the time its normal practice, tenders or offers invited make up a very small number of sales.

i have a long lost cousin in California though but that place i need to learn more about as with all areas.

At worst its a get to know America and at best all things will come to be. No real downside to that.

Keep the comments coming thank you.
 








 
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