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Why all the animosity towards Titan and others like him?

The are you a lathe or mill machinist can be legit.
I am definitely not a lathe machinist, I play one on TV, but that's it.

Remember macheening is a trade so there is actually the labels of apprentice, journeyman, master that apply.
Even though anymore its, have you watched 50 Youtube videos? Yup, then your a Master, start a channel learn'n others.
 
A Master macheeninst once told me, high end machinist don't get online to talk about machining on forums.
I semi agreed.
I am not a master machinist easily I can say that, but I also have been doing it long enough, and know enough to say, a lot people on here think they are master machinist,
and I can tell they know less than I do, but they are merely journeyman.
I'm just not too proud to admit it, my ego isn't that big. :D
 
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Anyone that has spent most of their life crafting their skills probably doesn't feel the need to go onto a forum to demonstrate their competence nor do they feel it wise to provide information for free on such knowledge as it certainly was not gained for nothing; It took a life to gain and that is the most valuable thing we have that can never be replaced.

I find it quite rude when people online demand in-depth knowledge be shared about any given subject simply because it is being requested.

It does seem that some do decide to share late in life only because they have so few that come to them honestly just wanting to learn and the opportunity to even use such in depth knowledge becomes so rare that the master is grateful to provide it simply to feel valuable again. This is especially true with subjects that aren't as popular as they once were.

It makes one wonder if there is a corollary between those who post frequently on this forum and those who actually have valuable advice to provide. I don't know how the "Reaction score" works on this forum but I think it should be based on how much positive feedback you get as a ratio of the amount of posts you provide.

It is easy to have respect for those who say the least but provide meaningful information when they do post.
 
Anyone that has spent most of their life crafting their skills probably doesn't feel the need to go onto a forum to demonstrate their competence nor do they feel it wise to provide information for free on such knowledge as it certainly was not gained for nothing; It took a life to gain and that is the most valuable thing we have that can never be replaced.

I find it quite rude when people online demand in-depth knowledge be shared about any given subject simply because it is being requested.

It does seem that some do decide to share late in life only because they have so few that come to them honestly just wanting to learn and the opportunity to even use such in depth knowledge becomes so rare that the master is grateful to provide it simply to feel valuable again. This is especially true with subjects that aren't as popular as they once were.

It makes one wonder if there is a corollary between those who post frequently on this forum and those who actually have valuable advice to provide. I don't know how the "Reaction score" works on this forum but I think it should be based on how much positive feedback you get as a ratio of the amount of posts you provide.

It is easy to have respect for those who say the least but provide meaningful information when they do post.
100% I have been doing this long enough, and as you mention as you get older you can hord the knowledge or give it out.

I haven't posted hardly anything about tool and die/injection mold stuff, as you mention I still kinda feel like hanging on to that, and share little of it.
Its more niche, and you cant just watch some Youboob videos to learn it.

My million posts in a short time is more to hangout and talk to like minded people, So you will see a millions post from me, mostly might not be machining help related, but just in gabbing.

Sometimes you share a tid bit, I almost never receive a tid bit.
 
My million posts in a short time is more to hangout and talk to like minded people...

I'm not talking about anyone in particular and when I did click on your profile just now it seems you have almost as much feedback as you do number of posts. I don't know what the "Reaction score" actually means, it may just be a simple value that is the total sum of all reactions to posts you have made? If that is the case your score is 90%, which is probably much higher than most and I think that would be a better scoring system, not that I was asked or anything.
 
No animosity here ...I have joined Gen Z with a three minute attention span ....and the cry "boooring'....boooring!!" ...... I watch ten second grabs of funny animals ,or people falling over.............never watch the scary road crash vids though ...afraid to go out the driveway.
 
A Master macheeninst once told me, high end machinist don't get online to talk about machining on forums.
I semi agreed.
I am not a master machinist easily I can say that, but I also have been doing it long enough, and know enough to say, a lot people on here think they are master machinist,
and I can tell they know less than I do, but they are merely journeyman.
I'm just not too proud to admit it, my ego isn't that big. :D
I actually do not believe in the term Master machinist. It's too damn subjective. Besides a big part of being a really good machinist is knowing where your experience is at and when you are not familiar with something. For example. If someone called me to make a bunch of gears on a lathe. I have hobbed and shaved gears. I have broached and shaped the id teeth on gears. I have never made a gear on a lathe. So If I took a job like that it would be after I talked to someone that had more experience than me on gear cutting on a lathe. To me that is one of the marks of a good machinist is knowing when to say "wait a minute I have not done a lot of this but Houdini has . Let me give him a holler."
 
The are you a lathe or mill machinist can be legit.
I am definitely not a lathe machinist, I play one on TV, but that's it.

Remember macheening is a trade so there is actually the labels of apprentice, journeyman, master that apply.
Even though anymore its, have you watched 50 Youtube videos? Yup, then your a Master, start a channel learn'n others.
Maybe we came up different. As I came up you was given a print and told " Have me 3 of these by the end of the day" Didn't matter what machine just get it done. With that being said I truly believe if someone handed you a part to make on a lathe you would figure it out and get it done. Now I like mills more than lathes by far so I guess that could make me a prefered mill guy?
 
I actually do not believe in the term Master machinist. It's too damn subjective. Besides a big part of being a really good machinist is knowing where your experience is at and when you are not familiar with something. For example. If someone called me to make a bunch of gears on a lathe. I have hobbed and shaved gears. I have broached and shaped the id teeth on gears. I have never made a gear on a lathe. So If I took a job like that it would be after I talked to someone that had more experience than me on gear cutting on a lathe. To me that is one of the marks of a good machinist is knowing when to say "wait a minute I have not done a lot of this but Houdini has . Let me give him a holler."
This is the mark of a good machinist, but, a guy who has ran a lathe, mill, grinder, edm, ....and competent at them all, I would consider a master and so would the industry, that's why they have that label.
Maybe we came up different. As I came up you was given a print and told " Have me 3 of these by the end of the day" Didn't matter what machine just get it done. With that being said I truly believe if someone handed you a part to make on a lathe you would figure it out and get it done. Now I like mills more than lathes by far so I guess that could make me a prefered mill guy?
Its not coming up different, Sure I can make a part on a lathe, edm, wire edm, manual, cnc...But I have mostly ran and programmed a mill,
where I worked the longest we had a guy who messed up a lot ADHD,
they had him run the lathes so he got better at them than everyone else, because its all he did.
but then all we did were the mills, so everyone else was more efficient at the mills.

Now you take that scenario times 15-25 years you can say I'm a lathe guy and I'm a mill guy.
and I don't know how many shops you have worked but this happens often, people who just work the lathe.
so in our industry its a common truth really.

When parts come in they go to a machine, not a person.

if someone is giving you a print and each order you willy nilly have to go get and use what ever machine available to get it done that's inefficient.
I wouldn't give the lathe guy a EDM part while the tool and die machinist runs the lathe, they each have superior skills on differing machines.
 
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This is the mark of a good machinist, but, a guy who has ran a lathe, mill, grinder, edm, ....and competent at them all, I would consider a master and so would the industry, that's why they have that label.

Its not coming up different, Sure I can make a part on a lathe, edm, wire edm, manual, cnc...But I have mostly ran and programmed a mill,
where I worked the longest we had a guy who messed up a lot ADHD,
they had him run the lathes so he got better at them than everyone else, because its all he did.
but then all we did were the mills, so everyone else was more efficient at the mills.

Now you take that scenario times 15-25 years you can say I'm a lathe guy and I'm a mill guy.
and I don't know how many shops you have worked but this happens often, people who just work the lathe.
so in our industry its a common truth really.

When parts come in they go to a machine, not a person.

if someone is giving you a print and each order you willy nilly have to go get and use what ever machine available to get it done that's inefficient.
I wouldn't give the lathe guy a EDM part while the tool and die machinist runs the lathe, they each have superior skills on differing machines.
Lot of shops my friend. 30 years worth. most of the shops i worked in in my younger days was mainly lathe, mill, blanchard or mattison grinders and surface grinders. Everybody in these shops could use them all, some better than others, but thats just the way it was. in most of the shops each person had a lathe and mill (CNC ) that was there responsibility and the grinders where separate from everyone. Grab a job from the board , make the shit, check it and have a co worker 2nd it, turn it in, grab another job. A lot of these where onesy and twosy and never seen again. It was really an awesome way to learn. Now I got more hours on mills than anything so by that I guess you would say I am a mill guy. Don't matter really to me. I just get shit done.

Edit* Houdini those shops where so much fun. You never knew what you would be running day to day a lot of the times. It was more like ok lets see what I am making today.
 
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Lot of shops my friend. 30 years worth. most of the shops i worked in in my younger days was mainly lathe, mill, blanchard or mattison grinders and surface grinders. Everybody in these shops could use them all, some better than others, but thats just the way it was. in most of the shops each person had a lathe and mill (CNC ) that was there responsibility and the grinders where separate from everyone. Grab a job from the board , make the shit, check it and have a co worker 2nd it, turn it in, grab another job. A lot of these where onesy and twosy and never seen again. It was really an awesome way to learn. Now I got more hours on mills than anything so by that I guess you would say I am a mill guy. Don't matter really to me. I just get shit done.

Edit* Houdini those shops where so much fun. You never knew what you would be running day to day a lot of the times. It was more like ok lets see what I am making today.
I never worked a shop like that, good learning experience, less redundancy, doesn't sound profitable:D , but I am not as old as some of the guys on here either :D


That shop sounds like how it was when I worked car audio installation, jobs were lined up in order, when you finished a car, pull it around grab another form the board, see what you get.
Every shop was like this, BUT, I was always the high-end and customer installer at the shop, I would catch salesman watching with a technically difficult car, and if they saw me coming around for a car, they would switch the order of the vehicles to give me the difficult ones.
This pissed me off, because overall you would make less money always doing the most difficult cars.(unless you were fast then you still made more than everyone, shhhhh)
They would get pissed off and say, but so and so cant do this car, and you can get it done faster.
My response was that if he cant do it, he shouldn't be here.

I changed this attitude over the years, highly technical skilled people became less and less.
I knew this would happen so I would talk to management at each shop and I just received a base pay on top of my piece rate to over compensate for getting and taking all the most difficult work.

edit: Actually I guess this same shit happened to me in machining, but I was getting paid hourly not piece rate, so I didn't give a shit if I had the more technically challenging jobs or not, and you knew you were, and are going to,
get more raises, and higher pay than the other guys, is what it is.
 
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I never worked a shop like that, good learning experience, less redundancy, doesn't sound profitable:D , but I am not as old as some of the guys on here either :D
I'm only 50 . I think I got in on the tail end because it changed pretty dramatically over my first 10 years. By then I was pretty well acclimated to different machines. Not an expert in any of them but solid and still learning. A couple of the shops I worked at done specialty work, (AKA you bring us your part and we will make a new one from measuring it and hoping it is close enough to the original to match up) I think I may have seen 10 blueprints for the 2 years I was there, everything else was using an old part as a guide. Very challenging but fun.
I changed this attitude over the years, highly technical skilled people became less and less
I have seen that more and more. I have a great set up guy on 1st shift for the lathes. I put him on a mill, and he was like a T-Rex trying to scratch his ass just going in circles. He just never had much time on them. He does better now with a little bit of experience and is starting to get more confidant.
 
The whole “turner” and “miller” thing is a throwback to “Mother England”. It goes back to the time when it was so busy that you could have a guy spend his entire career on a lathe or a mill.

Those terms were also used here in New Zealand but here if you can’t run multiple types of machinery than you are limiting your ability to do work because there isn’t enough work to specialise.

It would be like opening a welding shop and saying you are only going to TIG weld tool steels. You just limited your business big time. Now I’m going to caveat that by saying that I feel I could do it, but only because I spent over a decade working in a tool and die shop and I know what businesses need that work done.
 
I worked in a maintenance shop, great job and learning opportunities. It would have drove me nuts to run only one machine every day.
I work part time now in the job shop part, did one day on the production lathes. That was enough for me. The guys that do it, seem happy and turn out high precision parts by the crate load, but would be lost in my section, with all the constant set up.
That is not taking away anything from them though. Just a different skill set setting up runs and maintaining tenths.

Dave
 








 
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