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WTB Engine Lathe - single phase (120V or 240V) for hobbyist

Deude-Mann

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 27, 2021

thermite

Diamond
Start driving:

South Bend 10K for sale

If I didn't have a lathe (or several) this is the one I'd buy.

JIM?

Tax-a-two-shits WAS - a very long time ago - within the borders of the Old Dominion (Virginia Company). Most of the USA was. Clear to the Pacific. And even up into Western Canada. At one time.

But not "within Texas".

Texas is only barely bigger than France!
 

Deude-Mann

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 27, 2021
The northeast is a little too far for me to travel for a lathe. Even staying within Texas is a stretch... It's a big State. Example.. Driving from say San Antonio to San Diego, just getting to El Paso is half the trip. New Orleans is 9-10 hours in the other direction.
 

thermite

Diamond
The northeast is a little too far for me to travel for a lathe. Even staying within Texas is a stretch... It's a big State. Example.. Driving from say San Antonio to San Diego, just getting to El Paso is half the trip. New Orleans is 9-10 hours in the other direction.

Yah don't yet know how to LIVE!

Three of my zoo involved one-way air, pick up a Penske at the destination, as much as a thousand mile run home.

But you makes an adventure out of it! What was your OTHER option? Sit on your ass in front of a TV or 'puter screen?

Anyway.. Texas itself is NOT really devoid of used machine tools. Finding one just takes longer than a double-quarter-pounder with fries at a drive-in window.

But....will arrive with NO salt. And even less rancid GREASE than the Mickey Dee junk carries!

:D
 

dalmatiangirl61

Titanium
Joined
Jan 31, 2011
Location
BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx

Deude-Mann

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 27, 2021
Yah don't yet know how to LIVE!

:D

Oh I have made some road trips, and am usually up for one. Drove from Texas to Puerto Vallarta in two days, including a all day, all night run through Guadalajara, Tequila, and the infamous Devil's Backbone in the western Mexico mountains. You go off the road there, you die. No shoulders, no guardrails, steep drop offs. Nearly bit it at least once.

Then there was that 24 hour run from Central Texas to Detroit, non-stop. Had to get there in a hurry, long story.

Bought a car in North Carolina and drove it back to Texas. Bought a bike in Denver and rode it back to Texas. Drove an old POS Honda from Texas to Georgia and back. etc. etc.

Tow my race trailer all over the freaking place, Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Alabama...

But I digress..

There are a lot of lathes for sale in Texas, particularly in Houston where the economy is not doing so well right now.
 

thermite

Diamond
This group could start one. Call it the underground latheway!

You would have to be the most PATIENT person as ever snailed from Patagonia to Lower Post, BC, though!

"This group.." would have to break it down, paint it, change the belts, motor, drum switch, and countershaft, "think about" hand scraping all the surfaces NOT painted .......at each staging post along the way.

Then tarp it, outdoors, and neglect it long enough to pick up "light surface rust, only".. Figure three years to play with it, three more to give it that "patina"?

So the NEXT guy wasn't pissing and moaning he had been CHEATED of a chance to show his skill ..... agonize for a year over how best to remove rust, slather with two part primer even GOD can't properly afford, paint with a toxic brew that costs even MORE.. and post feelthy "before" and clean "after" photos!

It's a SOUTH BENT, after all.

That's what they are FOR!

:D
 

Antarctica

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jan 16, 2007
Location
Annapolis, Maryland
You're far more likely to get a deal on a solid lathe if you broaden your search not geographically, but in time. Watch craigs, eBay, FB marketplace, etc religiously and when the right thing shows up, move fast with cash. What you're looking for can definitely be had. Lathes are hard to move and people that don't want them that end up with them (estates, shops closing, etc.) just want them gone. Texas is a good area to pick up good iron. Plan ahead to have the tools to skid one onto your trailer.

For the phase converter, you jan just start with a three phase motor and rope start it. Works fine, especially if you're just driving a manual machine with no electronics.
 

JPT34

Plastic
Joined
Mar 13, 2021
This won't help you now, but it demonstrates that you can meet your needs with patience and by loosening your criteria a bit.

These two lathes were in an industrial auction in San Antonio last week on 23 March.

I previewed the lots and to my very untrained and equally unqualified eye, they both looked good.

The Hardinge spindle operated, the variable speed worked, the controls were a bit stiff but smooth, and the ways looked very good.

The Hardinge HLV-H with a lot of tooling went for $3,000.
HARDINGE HLV-H Precision Lathe, s/n H9581-T, w/ 3000 RPM, Tool Post


The Sharp 14x40 went for $2,750.
SHARP TAKISAWA TSL-1000D 14”x40” Tool Room Lathe, s/n T86010006, w/ 8” 6-Jaw Chuck, Quick Change


Both of these would have required a phase converter, which you can usually find available on Houston CL for not much.
 

Deude-Mann

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 27, 2021
Thanks y'all, keep it coming. Part of this search is knowing where to look. I have been watching the usual spots like Craigslist and Searchtempest (Craigslist on steroids), but some of the other search sites mentioned above are helpful, as well as the examples.

I'm disappointed I missed that Sharp in San Antonio. Ugh...
 

mattthemuppet

Hot Rolled
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
Location
San Antonio
This won't help you now, but it demonstrates that you can meet your needs with patience and by loosening your criteria a bit.

These two lathes were in an industrial auction in San Antonio last week on 23 March.

I previewed the lots and to my very untrained and equally unqualified eye, they both looked good.

The Hardinge spindle operated, the variable speed worked, the controls were a bit stiff but smooth, and the ways looked very good.

The Hardinge HLV-H with a lot of tooling went for $3,000.
HARDINGE HLV-H Precision Lathe, s/n H9581-T, w/ 3000 RPM, Tool Post


The Sharp 14x40 went for $2,750.
SHARP TAKISAWA TSL-1000D 14”x40” Tool Room Lathe, s/n T86010006, w/ 8” 6-Jaw Chuck, Quick Change


Both of these would have required a phase converter, which you can usually find available on Houston CL for not much.

Don't forget the 27% tax and premium charge on top of that. Plus whatever rigging fees the auction company decided to charge (not disclosed). Still pretty reasonable, perhaps more so for the HLV-H, but no screaming deal.

Those were 2 of very few decent deals at that auction, the rest that I was watching was just nuts. HF 13" drill press (new $300 + tax) went for $254 inc. fees, $70 less than new. A lot of 3 generic import 6" digital calipers went for $150 plus fees. It almost looked like a money laundering operation!
 

JPT34

Plastic
Joined
Mar 13, 2021
Don't forget the 27% tax and premium charge on top of that. Plus whatever rigging fees the auction company decided to charge (not disclosed). Still pretty reasonable, perhaps more so for the HLV-H, but no screaming deal.

Those were 2 of very few decent deals at that auction, the rest that I was watching was just nuts. HF 13" drill press (new $300 + tax) went for $254 inc. fees, $70 less than new. A lot of 3 generic import 6" digital calipers went for $150 plus fees. It almost looked like a money laundering operation!

Agreed on all counts.

The Jet combination sander was another great example.

RE: HLV-H

If it's any solace on the $3k, on the same day another HLV-H went for $10,500 at an auction in Ohio.

{ Group of lots: 228, 229, 230, 231, 232 } HARDINGE MODEL HLV-H SUPER PRECISION TOOLROOM LATHE;
 

Deude-Mann

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 27, 2021
HF 13" drill press (new $300 + tax) went for $254 inc. fees, $70 less than new. A lot of 3 generic import 6" digital calipers went for $150 plus fees. It almost looked like a money laundering operation!

Sounds like auction fever! Watch out for the red mist.
 

JPT34

Plastic
Joined
Mar 13, 2021
Sounds like auction fever! Watch out for the red mist.


Yes, very much agreed.

Auctions can be a good source, if you know the new or market price of what you are buying.

Some firms publish the prices of past auctions and that can help you research what typical auction values are for the type and size of lathes you are interested in.

Auction prices can vary, such as the recent one in San Antonio.

If they are in the early lots, common items, such as Kurt vices, can give you an indication if that particular auction is bringing higher than normal prices.

If you go the auction route, it's a good idea to have a spreadsheet pre-built and pre-populated with the retail / market prices of the lots you are interested in, with the buyer's premium % and sales taxes calculated.

That can help you know what the actual total out-the-door price is and to establish a firm, maximum bid per lot prior to the event.

Otherwise, you can get caught up in the red mist...
:)
 








 
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