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WTB: GOOD CONDITION WARNER & SWASEY #3

Is this one comparable in size?
 
Is this one comparable in size?
#5 lathe are quite a bit bigger than a #3.
 
The overall size is larger, but the footprint is only slightly larger. RPM varies greatly from machine to machine since they were basically all custom machines. Our Gisholt beats out the W&S #3 we have on both the top and bottom end of the rpm spread. However accessories seem to be much more plentiful in the W&S flavors. To each his own. Good luck with the search!
 
I can't imagine devoting floor space to a turret lathe instead of a CNC unless it was something real specialized. There's lots of titanium stuff around here with the big foundry we have here. The shops that do lots of that work have some monster 75HP W&S squareheads set up with big spades and such for poking holes in titanium.

240 to 480 transformers are dirt cheap and everywhere. They are usually advertised as 480 to 240 stepdown transformers. The secret is the pixies work in reverse too so you get 480 out if you put 240 in.
 
But you can't fit a CNC of equal capacity in the space of a turret lathe, nor purchase a CNC for the price of a turret lathe. Also CNCs tend to be a bigger gamble in the used market over a manual machine. (At least in my experience)
 
OP is not a typical job shop, I can see how a #3 works well for him doing small quantities of relatively simple but varied parts to support larger jobs.
Several times a month I wish mine was in the corner and ready to run for a handful of parts that I could have completed in less than the time it takes to set up a turning center, and way faster than an engine lathe. A turret lathe is the shit for drilling and tapping endwork.
Running parts for days at a time? CNC all the way.
The worst wear on a #3 is always the back side of the front bed way. That gets showered with chips and dirt, and there's no wiper to keep them from getting into the space between the way and the carriage. As soon as that spot wears, the machine starts to turn a barrel shape, and just get worse, the more it wears the faster it wears because the gap gets bigger and lets more debris in. I once bought a #3 square head that looked extremely nice and clean, once it was on my floor I found it cut a .006 barrel over 6" length near the chuck, the way was worn .003. The only fix would have been rescraping, the estimate for that was over half of what I paid for the machine in 1988 when they still brought good $. I can't imagine how a rough looking machine measures right there. That must be why most older ones are run using all turret tools.
 
OP is not a typical job shop, I can see how a #3 works well for him doing small quantities of relatively simple but varied parts to support larger jobs.
Several times a month I wish mine was in the corner and ready to run for a handful of parts that I could have completed in less than the time it takes to set up a turning center, and way faster than an engine lathe. A turret lathe is the shit for drilling and tapping endwork.
Running parts for days at a time? CNC all the way.
The worst wear on a #3 is always the back side of the front bed way. That gets showered with chips and dirt, and there's no wiper to keep them from getting into the space between the way and the carriage. As soon as that spot wears, the machine starts to turn a barrel shape, and just get worse, the more it wears the faster it wears because the gap gets bigger and lets more debris in. I once bought a #3 square head that looked extremely nice and clean, once it was on my floor I found it cut a .006 barrel over 6" length near the chuck, the way was worn .003. The only fix would have been rescraping, the estimate for that was over half of what I paid for the machine in 1988 when they still brought good $. I can't imagine how a rough looking machine measures right there. That must be why most older ones are run using all turret tools.


I agree that they are a handy addition.
You are saying that you are getting this barrel in a Z axis turn from the carraige?
I don't think that I have ever used a turret lathe in that manner.

Years ago we had a #5 Gisholt that we actually took the carraige completely off of so's not to be in the road for whatever we were running on it at the time.

Ended up selling that to a customer and they used it for a long time as was.
I am sure that we gave them the carraige as well, but no clue if they ever re-assembled?


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
You are saying that you are getting this barrel in a Z axis turn from the carraige?
I don't think that I have ever used a turret lathe in that manner.
Right. That machine came from a Campbell Soup plant, they must have run it that way a long time. I used mine that way when I was making production parts with it, they are teriffic for that what with the adjustable feed knockoff and all. I'd rather that way than the turret to turn 6" dia parts in multiple diameters and multiple passes. Plus you run out of turret positions pretty quick.
 
I'd rather that way than the turret to turn 6" dia parts in multiple diameters and multiple passes. Plus you run out of turret positions pretty quick.
Gisholt made a vertical - 12v ? with a tracer and like a six-station indexing template that would either automatically or semi-automatically take several passes. Sounds like it would have been perfect for you :)

I think you could do something similar on (hydraulic) production lathes, too, but setup was very time-consuming on those. CNC came along just in time to save me from that experience.
 








 
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