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WTB taper micrometers and none appear to be currently made, why?

steve-l

Active member
I very rarely find any even used and if you do, they are ridiculously expensive. Is anybody making these today?
 

TGTool

Active member
I can't speak to whether anyone is making them today. I'd presume that it's such a tiny market no manufacturer wants to chase it for the specialized tooling required to supply them. Then also, it may be that with such a short sine, it's difficult to provide the accuracy that a user might want.

As a comparison, I frequently have to set a compound to 8 degrees to machine ER collet cavities. I use a sine bar to set up and hope to get a deviation of a tenth or less in about 2-1/2' of travel. If it were as much as three tenths, that would mean six tenths on the diameter, which doesn't sound very good. Sure, the collet itself is shorter than that, but even a little inaccuracy is discernible with a careful feel at either the inner or outer end or with marking compound. If I had to duplicate an existing taper from only a taper micrometer measurement, I'd have a considerable anxiety about accuracy and would be prepared to tweak the setting if necessary and if possible.

Given all that, if I were a manufacturer I'd either just give up or charge enough to make it worth the trouble for producing onesies or twosies..
 

steve-l

Active member
I can't speak to whether anyone is making them today. I'd presume that it's such a tiny market no manufacturer wants to chase it for the specialized tooling required to supply them. Then also, it may be that with such a short sine, it's difficult to provide the accuracy that a user might want.

As a comparison, I frequently have to set a compound to 8 degrees to machine ER collet cavities. I use a sine bar to set up and hope to get a deviation of a tenth or less in about 2-1/2' of travel. If it were as much as three tenths, that would mean six tenths on the diameter, which doesn't sound very good. Sure, the collet itself is shorter than that, but even a little inaccuracy is discernible with a careful feel at either the inner or outer end or with marking compound. If I had to duplicate an existing taper from only a taper micrometer measurement, I'd have a considerable anxiety about accuracy and would be prepared to tweak the setting if necessary and if possible.

Given all that, if I were a manufacturer I'd either just give up or charge enough to make it worth the trouble for producing onesies or twosies..

It is easy to criticize taper mics, but I know of nothing better, do you?
 

TGTool

Active member
It is easy to criticize taper mics, but I know of nothing better, do you?


I guess like other situations, if it's the only tool that will work, then you've got to have it.

You haven't said anything about the application so I can't comment on anything better. I use a 5" B&S sine bar and it's a lot cheaper. I can picture situations where a sine table would work better. And other cases where it would be a compound sine table I want. Or there might be instances where a CMM or optical comparator would work as well or better. Tell me why those won't work.
 

steve-l

Active member
I guess like other situations, if it's the only tool that will work, then you've got to have it.

You haven't said anything about the application so I can't comment on anything better. I use a 5" B&S sine bar and it's a lot cheaper. I can picture situations where a sine table would work better. And other cases where it would be a compound sine table I want. Or there might be instances where a CMM or optical comparator would work as well or better. Tell me why those won't work.

The application is to measure a taper on the end of a shaft in order to setup a taper attachment on a lathe to duplicate it in those cases that do not allow the/a shaft to be mounted in the lathe as a model in which case a simple DI can be used. Setting up a TA is always approximate in every case. fine tuning is always required in my experience anyway.
 

TDegenhart

New member
Make a cast of the end of the shaft, section it and use traditional methods to determine the taper. As you have said, setting up a machine to produce that taper will require tweaking.

Tom
 

steve-l

Active member
Make a cast of the end of the shaft, section it and use traditional methods to determine the taper. As you have said, setting up a machine to produce that taper will require tweaking.

Tom

That certainly works, but a taper mic is seconds not hours. The down side of taper mics is not accuracy, it is that you need a set of several.
 

Homeshopblob

New member
Each one has a pretty large range. My largest is about 10" to about 13", the smallest is 0 to about 1.5" A parallel would easily make a larger one read a smaller taper.
 

mmarquette

New member
Was thinking of making one out of 2 measuring devices of choice . Either ball mics or 4” dial calipers with rod between that places then at know width . Say maybe 3”
Could use to measure and lock them to use as gauge as needed
 

gbent

Active member
Those of you criticizing the accuracy of taper mics have never used one. No, it isn't as accurate as a vee block on a sine plate, but they will me to quickly measure the part on the lathe or grinder and take a good piece to inspection for verification.

The repeatability is extremely good. You put the fixed end on the taper, and adjust the mic so the moveable end swings past the taper centerline. You can feel the drag, and a few tenths makes a significant difference in feel.
 

steve-l

Active member
Those of you criticizing the accuracy of taper mics have never used one. No, it isn't as accurate as a vee block on a sine plate, but they will me to quickly measure the part on the lathe or grinder and take a good piece to inspection for verification.

The repeatability is extremely good. You put the fixed end on the taper, and adjust the mic so the moveable end swings past the taper centerline. You can feel the drag, and a few tenths makes a significant difference in feel.

You are totally correct and I don't understand why there is not more demand. I really need a small set of them and they are scarcer than hen's teeth in a haystack!
 

Mcgyver

Active member
I've often pined for one as well....anyone know a machinist or tool maker? Using a commercial mic barrel, it might be a good product for a small, low volume shop
 

Conrad Hoffman

Active member
I'd think if somebody wanted to manufacture them, a deal could be made with somebody making digital micrometers so the thing could read out directly in angle, decimal degrees, DMS or radians to keep the physicists happy. I doubt there's enough demand to justify it, but you never know.

These are stupidly cheap for what they are and could probably measure tapers pretty well- eoocvt 0-320deg Universal Stainless Steel Vernier Bevel Protractor,Angle Finder for Woodworking, Carpenter, Construction, DIY Precision Angle Measuring Finder Ruler Tool - - Amazon.com
 

steve-l

Active member
I'd think if somebody wanted to manufacture them, a deal could be made with somebody making digital micrometers so the thing could read out directly in angle, decimal degrees, DMS or radians to keep the physicists happy. I doubt there's enough demand to justify it, but you never know.

These are stupidly cheap for what they are and could probably measure tapers pretty well- eoocvt 0-320deg Universal Stainless Steel Vernier Bevel Protractor,Angle Finder for Woodworking, Carpenter, Construction, DIY Precision Angle Measuring Finder Ruler Tool - - Amazon.com

Conrad, taper mics read distance per inch of taper not angle and that's what I need. From that I can calculate angle if I need, but I need distance per foot of taper. Just multiply by 12 and wala! Very simple and fast.
 

TGTool

Active member
Anyone got pics...sounds interesting but I can't picture them.


Post #14 has a link.

I can see an application. Lots of tapers on shafts have a shoulder that makes a larger tool unwieldy or impossible. I'm half tempted to buy a cheap large mic on ebay and start hacking and brazing. With the ready availability of calculators, even the length of the sine isn't critical, so long as you know what it actually is. It could be an inch, and inch and a little more, or whatever. Just store the sine length and let the calculator tell you what you need.
 








 
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