Doall vs Brown and Sharpe
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Wisconsin Rapids WI
    Posts
    351
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default Doall vs Brown and Sharpe

    I had posted some general questions over on the general forum but am going to look at three machines. A Doall from the 1950s, G1 or G7 or D6, two axis, 6x18 with permanent magnet and Parker spindle. Doall 8-24 slightly newer, two axis, 2 hp, 10" wheel, chuck is standard with Selectron control. Third is Brown and Sharpe 618. I know the least about it but think it is similar to the smaller Doall with maybe a fine pole chuck.

    I understand that condition is everything and I'm pretty good at judging old machines although this will be tough as I'm new to metalworking ( rehabbed lots of woodworking machines ). Assuming I can judge the condition, are there good and bad about Doall vs B and S? Spindle, controls, better lube systems, easier to find parts or replacements for, etc. I know the quirks of Oliver vs Yates, vs Wadkin,but just learning about grinders. Dave

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,204
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4167
    Likes (Received)
    3968

    Default

    So long as you are referring to an old version B & S, not a Micro- or Tech-master?
    I've got both both DoAll D1030 & B & S 618. Both auto 2 axis. B & S is re-scraped.

    What do you plan to do with it?

    The DoAll is far the superior machine for surface grinding. It is hydraulic as opposed to mechanical auto.
    D- series is going to be newer, and has some development compared to G-

    If you plan mostly small tool making & sharpening, a 6-18 size machine with 7 or 8" wheel is more convenient, "practical", & cheaper to accumulate a selection of wheels and shaped wheels for including diamond/superabrasives.

    For mostly surface grinding, get the biggest machine with the biggest wheel.

    As you note, condition is everything unless you can rescrape them yourself.

    smt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    5,556
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1789
    Likes (Received)
    1721

    Default

    Yeah, which B&S? Old rounded machine or the newer ones? Latest version machines were outstanding, Micromaster Series II (Series I are great too) - and were available with either manual or up to 3axis automatic feeds.
    Last edited by eKretz; 10-10-2020 at 12:10 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Wisconsin Rapids WI
    Posts
    351
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    Comparing the old Iron Doall and B and S to newer but equal priced Taiwan made Kent, Acer, Sharp etc, are the newer machines a decent risk? I know the build and quality differences between newer and older woodworking machines but not those related to surface grinders. I see some good pricing on 10x20 and even 12x24 vs the J and S 540 or B and S 618. Any advice on the good or bad of newer but used offshore machines? Dave

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    79
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    30
    Likes (Received)
    22

    Default

    I have a 1966 B&S Micromaster 618 in very good condition, 2 axis auto.
    It's an outstanding machine for general surface grinding.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •