Grinding Glass at an Angle (with precision)
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    Default Grinding Glass at an Angle (with precision)

    Hello everyone,

    This is a coldworking (glass) related question.

    I'm new to grinding, and will be buying a grinder soon.

    To start, I plan to make basic 3D geometric shapes for practice, like a hexagon with sheet/plate glass (see picture).
    3d-hexagon.jpg


    For this I'll prepare 6 individual components and stick them together as shown. Each individual component will have to be ground at an angle of 60 degrees so that it mates with its neighbours correctly and forms the hexagon. Here is a diagram of the individual component:

    component.jpg

    My question is, is there a dedicated clamp or some device that can hold the glass plate at 60 degees (or any other angle) for me as I press it into the grinding surface? I want it to be as close to 60 degrees as possible.

    I'm not from the glass industry so I don't know what a lot of these techniques/equipment are called. I'm aware of angle grinders /hand held grinders and how they can be used to machine inclined surfaces. But with those, it boils down to skill and craftsmanship, yes? Even if I become really great with a hand grinder, I might still struggle to achieve a perfect 60 (or any other angle).

    Surely such an angle clamp/device exists? Something like a lapidary faceting arm for plate glass?

    Also, what kind of grinder would you recommend? I'm torn between a lap grinder and a belt grinder.

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    There are many useful glass fabrication videos on Youtube.

    Wax and/or plaster is the customary method of holding glass when producing facets.

    Mechanical devices are often seen when working gem stones, but not plate glass.

    Google is your friend, lots of ideas there.

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    Holding the glass is a given. The grinding of it is the question, Right! if you intent to mate each piece to another, as with glue, you need a precise angle cut on the glass, and repeated 12 times. You did not show a frame, so that is what I assume.

    If you have not worked plate glass before, this is a poor choice to start with, there will be no margin for error. 20mm thick glass will be unforgiving, and each piece will be $$ when you scrap it.

    Find a business that does this kind of work, then put something together so you might learn .

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    Come on guys, Read the post!

    The question posed was
    [quote]

    My question is, is there a dedicated clamp or some device that can hold the glass plate at 60 degees (or any other angle) for me as I press it into the grinding surface? I want it to be as close to 60 degrees as possible. [end quote]

    My experience is a tilting table with the blanks waxed to it.

    Like this one:
    Precise Tilting Table 7" x 10" - TTP-002 - Penn Tool Co., Inc

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    I have been involved in the glass field for 30 years. What you attempting to do is bevel the glass. Sounds easy and it is with the correct equipment (expensive), unless you are going to doing a lot of pieces, using a machine designed for the task, things will go side ways quick.
    One or to off I have some suggestions for you.
    PM me if the spirit moves you.

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    If you want accuracy use a sine plate.

    Tom

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    Hey Doug, the spirit moves me and I've sent you a message

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    Thanks Cal.

    Would you suggest a lap grinder or would you recommend a belt grinder for a beginner?

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    I would say belt grinder, since I have one that I converted to metal use. Mine uses 4"x 102" long belts. The belt grinder should be wet, and low horsepower is fine for glass, mine had a 3/4 hp when I got it. Another advantage is it is easy and cheap to change belts for different grits. Is it silicon carbide? grit used on the glass belts?


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