Hardend D2 Material grinding wheel selection
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    Default Hardend D2 Material grinding wheel selection

    Hi every one
    I have v.m.c machine
    But i have a workpiece in which..
    I have to grind hardend d2 material its hardness is 60 -62 hrc
    High carbon and high chrome so please suggest me which type grinding wheel i have to prifer for it

    Some one told me go for diamond type grinding wheel some says cbn wheel but i have zero knowledge in grinding wheels so please suggest me which type of gride size of abrasive i have to choose

    Thanks in advance ...👍

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    Do not use a diamond wheel. If you need a superabrasive wheel it's CBN that you want.

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    No on diamond although if all you have on hand you may be able to make it work.
    CBN in fancy and expensive wheels but why not just a conventional and much cheaper normal grinding wheel.
    CBN wheels are not easy to make work right if you do not have experience and the right grit/bond not to mention dressing and stick. These best used in high production settings in this material.
    I'd be in a soft normal type white wheel. Grit? Have no idea as I do not know stock, grind type, and finish numbers.
    One part, twenty parts, 50,000 parts?
    D2 in this range grinds nicely, it does like coolant.
    It can also be hard turned or hard milled.
    Bob

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    tool steel is hard to grind, the right wheel for this would be a silicon carbide grinding wheel. plenty of coolant as it will crack, aluminum oxide wheel will require dressing every part and will glaze which causes cracks, due to heat build up. check with the local sales engineers,
    cbn is for high alloy or carburized parts
    diamond works best for carbide

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    D2 wears normal alox wheels very quickly, you need a 3SG or 5SG wheel, or you'll be re-dressing like mad.

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    I would agree Peter, other than if there are only a few parts - then a plain 38A works just fine with a few tweaks to process. I was able to recently take about a 1/16" of material per dress on some 60Rc D-2 with no issues (Guy left all that stock instead of rough milling it before HT for some reason). Probably not going to get much farther than that though, and my surface area wasn't very large.

    I have never heard of a silicon carbide wheel being recommended for hardened D-2.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    I have never heard of a silicon carbide wheel being recommended for hardened D-2.
    I agree. That is such a weird suggestion for grinding steel of any kind.

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    Grinding in a VMC??? I definitely wouldn't recommend it.

    Surface or cylindrical grinder, CBN if you are doing a lot of it. 60J or K if its just a few parts.

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    we had good luck grinding low alloy carburized parts, that were 60 HRc min case hardness, outside diameters, ang high precision gears,
    worked well on tools steels as well. but stock removal generally was .005 inch per surface.
    most of these parts had to be Temper etched(no over temper) and Magnetic Particle Inspected with no indications,
    your mileage will vary, no creep grinding here.
    just because you have not used it, it doesn't mean it doesn't work, it worked well for form grinding and holding tight tolerances.
    like I said earlier contact a sales engineer for your application. they are the experts, not freaking internet.

    edit: also Imay have miss quoted could have been this I for get shit: Ceramic Aluminium Oxide

    Which Grinding Wheel Should I Choose? | Norton

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    Dude, I'm going to be blunt. Don't be a dick. Nobody said it didn't work for you, just that it's an unusual recommendation. In my experience - and yeah I've done plenty of grinding in the last 20+ years too - silicon carbide wheels are used on nonferrous materials and some stainless steels, not much else besides rough grinding of tungsten carbide or other similar brittle hard materials. If you had success with it, great. Add the information and leave out the snark. This forum is not just "the internet." We have a shit-ton of knowledgeable guys here - many ARE the experts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    Dude, I'm going to be blunt. Don't be a dick. Nobody said it didn't work for you, just that it's an unusual recommendation. In my experience - and yeah I've done plenty of grinding in the last 20+ years too - silicon carbide wheels are used on nonferrous materials and some stainless steels, not much else besides rough grinding of tungsten carbide or other similar brittle hard materials. If you had success with it, great. Add the information and leave out the snark. This forum is not just "the internet." We have a shit-ton of knowledgeable guys here - many ARE the experts.
    I agree. That is such a weird suggestion for grinding steel of any kind.

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    Silicon carbide for steel? Never heard of it. Wonder if the poster of that is confused on a name, or if sales rep said "it's silicon carbide" when it may well have been something else. Also form grinding with that???

    OP, not up to speed on grinding too much these days as I don't work in a toolroom anymore, but an open grain (don't know the lettering scheme) 46 grit will get you going, just lots of dressing to get to final size and finish if lots of stock coming off.

    5DFE7 Engineering Tech Sheet,Grinding Wheels | Zoro.com

    Might be worth the few bucks to buy it, although I am sure there is a pdf floating around somewhere for free...

    edit: following the Norton link provided earlier, I checked off surface grinding and hard carbon steel. All that comes up for me is aluminum oxide and ceramic alumina.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1953chevB View Post
    I agree. That is such a weird suggestion for grinding steel of any kind.
    Yeah, and?

    It IS a weird suggestion... I just now went to your suggested link at Norton and even there it doesn't recommend silicon carbide wheels for grinding steel... That doesn't mean it didn't work for you in your particular case. Nor does it mean that something else may not have worked even better...

    I have found that silicon carbide wheels break down too fast for doing much work in hardened steel - I sure wouldn't be picking one as my first choice for form grinding like for gear teeth. Along with Mike, I wonder if you aren't confusing the grit type too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    Yeah, and?

    It IS a weird suggestion... I just now went to your suggested link at Norton and even there it doesn't recommend silicon carbide wheels for grinding steel... That doesn't mean it didn't work for you in your particular case. Nor does it mean that something else may not have worked even better...

    I have found that silicon carbide wheels break down too fast for doing much work in hardened steel - I sure wouldn't be picking one as my first choice for form grinding like for gear teeth. Along with Mike, I wonder if you aren't confusing the grit type too.
    It was recommended by our grinding wheel sales engineer, and it worked, it required less dressing, held size and form, the guys on the floor were happy with it.
    aluminum oxide works but requires more dressing and often glaze and cause cracks and burns,

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    Silicon carbide for steel? Never heard of it. Wonder if the poster of that is confused on a name, or if sales rep said "it's silicon carbide" when it may well have been something else. Also form grinding with that???

    OP, not up to speed on grinding too much these days as I don't work in a toolroom anymore, but an open grain (don't know the lettering scheme) 46 grit will get you going, just lots of dressing to get to final size and finish if lots of stock coming off.

    5DFE7 Engineering Tech Sheet,Grinding Wheels | Zoro.com

    Might be worth the few bucks to buy it, although I am sure there is a pdf floating around somewhere for free...

    edit: following the Norton link provided earlier, I checked off surface grinding and hard carbon steel. All that comes up for me is aluminum oxide and ceramic alumina.
    read the links provided, it's not common to use for steel, but hey it worked.

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    I just read the entire pdf you linked. There really wasn't much mention of SiC wheel use, but here is a direct quote regarding grinding hardened steels:

    Conventional Al2O3 wheels arerecommended, but SiC wheels can be
    a better choice for high surface finish
    when a small amount of material is to
    be ground.
    The tables at the end for recommended wheel choices were also mostly recommending Al2O3 or CBN wheels. Very few recommended silicon carbide. Most recommendations were, as I already stated, for certain hardened stainless steels.

    So in specific cases for light finishing work you can get away with a SiC wheel, but it will not be a very common choice. For your specific case maybe it made sense; don't know, wasn't there. For D-2 I wouldn't think SiC would be much use.

    So, you see why we all think it's an unusual or "weird" choice? Maybe unconventional would be a better word.

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    I would rarely leave more than .010 stock per surface, and was usually .005 stock per surface, and I been doing this for 35 years,
    all different type of parts but mostly cylindrical, and harden or carburized gear teeth. but hey different strokes for different folks.
    creep grinding whole another ball game. my stuff mostly OD, ID, surface grinding, I worked in gear grinding and grind shops,
    there is a tiny little blurb not much grinding.jpg

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    Yes i know its complicated but i dont have any option because of job geometry i need cnc machine ..and job quantity are huge

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    Silicon carbide for steel? Never heard of it. Wonder if the poster of that is confused on a name, or if sales rep said "it's silicon carbide" when it may well have been something else. Also form grinding with that???

    OP, not up to speed on grinding too much these days as I don't work in a toolroom anymore, but an open grain (don't know the lettering scheme) 46 grit will get you going, just lots of dressing to get to final size and finish if lots of stock coming off.

    5DFE7 Engineering Tech Sheet,Grinding Wheels | Zoro.com

    Might be worth the few bucks to buy it, although I am sure there is a pdf floating around somewhere for free...

    edit: following the Norton link provided earlier, I checked off surface grinding and hard carbon steel. All that comes up for me is aluminum oxide and ceramic alumina.
    with precision ground gears , typically for aircraft application, these attributes have to be held
    lead (parallel )
    Involute (and can be tricky).0002-.0003 inch tolerance form of the gear
    total and tooth to tooth error(index).0002 inch tooth to tooth
    modified tip offs

    so important to maintain the wheel form
    this was the application.

    on journals cylindricity sometimes as low as .0002 tolerance, and concentric W/I .0003 tolerance


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