Harig #1 Setting Grinding Heigth
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  1. #1
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    Default Harig #1 Setting Grinding Heigth

    Anyone with Harig or similar unit have any tips or tricks for zeroing stock in the V block to grind. I am using my Interaped .0005 on a Noga and can not seem to zero or get close enough to grind a part with it.
    I have been using the ratchet screw on the side. I have resorted to a soft face mallet. Everything is cleaned with light film of #2 way.

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    First make sure your V block is in the center of the rotation of the spindle (may have to adjust the keepers that the V block slides in). Then you can bring the part to center and it should run true. If you are gripping on a different diameter than you are grinding, make sure the two diameters are concentric. If its gripping on the same diameter, make sure it is straight.

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    I always set up with a tenths indicator on a surface plate. Clamp the world in the V block, set at 90*, zero the indicator, swing the work 180* and check. Each side should read the same. Now swing the work 90* so the work is low and adjust it up to zero. Swing it 180* and check. Lock the V block slide and check again all the way around. If the indicator readings are erratic the work is either bent or tapered.
    Dennis

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    I think the op is trying to use a Harrig Grind=All, not a simple vee block.

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    If it's like mine, there isn't any adjustment for the lateral position of the V-block, just the rack screw to move it up and down. I do it just like post #3. The screw on the front of the V-block can't be too loose or the block will shift slightly when you tighten it. It does have to be tightened fully before using the gadget. I'm not sure things can be centered better than about 0.0001" TIR.

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    It is just the rack screw, with a single allen bolt in the front. I’ll try some of the suggestions. Thanks for taking the time to reply.

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    If the V block is off center (detectable with the indicator when the work is swung 90* right and left) I believe the only fix is to send the Grindall back to Harig for reconditioning. Mine is off about .0002" but is close enough for my needs. I just split the difference and use that number to set the height from the surface plate. If yours is off more, like .001" or more, you can try shimming the work off one side of the V before you set the height. In any event spin the work when touching off with the wheel and you will know you are picking up the high point.
    Dennis

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    A good V block line a Brown & sharp or the like everything is near perfect..

    A poor import or poor home made V block the V angle may be off perfect angles and so the part may be off at different heights.
    A .002 /.003 off one can be marked for the off side so doing that close a job , just figure that in with dials.
    (Or a .0002/,003 surface grinder skim...)knowing your grinder and skills are up to that.

    Some times it is good to plate feel the part before grinding. So before grind touch your indicator told you this side is .0003--.0001 heavy.

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    Buck, we're not talking any V block, but the movable V block that is part of a Harig #1 Grind-All.
    D

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    Thanks Moldman..I see that now..

    Much the same to plate feel the part in the Grind All..if everything comes .000? off the same way I likely would grind something.

    Back when smoking was in the clear pack wrapper was handy to off set a part in a grind all. Perhaps .0008 I think.

    Handy to have a set of shims..I cut mine in lengths so the length tells the size..marked with a dremel point works also,

    We had .001 and .0015 for setting up broach packages to close, but thin shim is difficult to use and hard to mark.

    I always thought it would be good to have perhaps .005 - .0051 .0052 - .0053- .0054 - .0055

    I know I could grind up such a set. Perhaps I will do that when I run out of things to do. But now mostly retired hve little need for things that close.
    Yes that would be 6 new shim sizes but would be very handy.

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    Could someone do some trig for me since I'm in the hospital and have access to neither CAD nor a scientific calculator...

    For each .001" shim applied to one side of a 45* V block, how much does it move the pin over? IIRC it would be (sine 45 deg. X .001).
    Dennis

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    Quote Originally Posted by Modelman View Post
    Could someone do some trig for me since I'm in the hospital and have access to neither CAD nor a scientific calculator...

    For each .001" shim applied to one side of a 45* V block, how much does it move the pin over? IIRC it would be (sine 45 deg. X .001).
    Dennis
    0.000707 off top of my head. Rule of thumb is target-distance * √2 to center in a vee-block. Hope this helps.

    Best Regards,
    Bob

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    Lock the Harig with the ways parallel to your surface plate. Zero on the OD then rotate the low side down 90 degrees and bring it up to zero with the ratchet screw. Snug the vee block screw and rotate the part and tap until you get the runout within your limits. You didn't say how close your trying to get it indicated in or what the grinding tolerance of the part is. This should not take but 5 mintutes to get within a couple tenths. If you need to hold a closer runout your vee block may be too tight in the ways and not giving you enough movement side to side. Other than that the vee block may need skimmed on the high side to bring it inline with the low side.Do not hit the vee bolck hard or it will put flat spots on the ball bearing and racewhich will show up when you spin an OD. Good Luck

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    Locating the part and locking down the V-block should be done in a series of steps. Use of a mallet sounds like way too much force needed to adjust the position and isn't good for the rack/gear. Adjust your technique don't use a bigger hammer. I use a small piece of copper round about 2" long x 3/4" for adjusting. Snug the SHCS locking screw and tap the V-block into position, tighten the SHCS a bit more and check position again. If it hasn't moved fully tighten (doesn't take much) and check again. I always set mine on the surface plate before transferring it to the grinder. Usually it was a 5 minute procedure to set-up. Condition of the Harig and fitment of the V-block are everything. If you're getting too much run-out side-to-side then the V-block has too much play and has likely been altered by someone. It's also about how much allowable run-out you're asking for. I used +/-.0002 for general work in die shops for stamping dies with clearance in excess of .005 per side. Excessive fussiness is time wasted. If you do need better results than you're getting, you've not stated what they are, then you can either compensate by shim or simply get another unit that delivers the accuracy you need. There's also the St. Mary style of spinner that doesn't need adjusting if that would work for you. You haven't stated accuracy needed or what you're using it for, it makes a difference. Hope this helped.

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    Some work is just for clean up to polishing part. Other is slip fit parts. I don’t think when ATCO made these tools they were considering hammers for fine adjustment.

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    Nope, hammers were NOT part of the process. Small piece of lead/copper/brass held in hand (no handle) is enough if you take your time and locate in a series of tightening the lock screw as I posted above. Take your time and learn the technique, it will become second nature after a while and you won't have to abuse the spin fixture. You still didn't post numbers so I have no idea what your tolerance is....


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