Homemade Sanding Belts - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Unbelievable, but true: 13,000 people interested enough in this topic to have viewed the thread since 2009.
    And that on a forum that caters to mostly professional machinists...I'm amazed!!
    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix – Design & Innovation - home
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

  2. #22
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    NO SEAM ENDLESS BELT
    I dont want to hijac your thread ,but I would gladly pay double for a true seamless sanding belt .No one makes one . It sure seams that some manufacturer of belts would make one at least in their most popular size. I know it can be done ,they have been making seamless nylon stockings for woman for 50 years now.Edwin

  3. #23
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    I too needed to reglue popped sanding belts. I took several and used Gorilla glue (scraped off old glue then slightly wetted both sides and added Gorilla glue to both sides---spread it with a knife) then put them together and wrapped with one layer of aluminum tape for ducting (not duct tape) name Flextape. Then clamp pressed this joint between two pieces of wood over night. Next morning I took it apart and pulled off the tape. Glue joint was great. Put the belt on my sander (1" x 42") and proceeded to sand away. Did not break and finished my job.

    Gorilla glue is great.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAG 180 View Post
    Sheldahl sell all the belt splicing supplies, from the polyester jointing tape to the urethane glue to the Desmodur cross linker additive to impart the extra strength and heat resistance. The crosslinker lets you join a belt with urethane glue in a heated clamp in about a minute instead of 24 hours. The website also has data sheets with require temps and pressures to join a belt, I had all the right glues and additives and left the belt for 24 hours after joining for maximum strength.


    WebPages - SplicingTapes

    they will no longer sell to the general public

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by atty View Post
    I've made more of 'em than I can count, and I'm still in the research stage. My method duplicates the store bought version. If you'll notice their joint, it is two matching 45º angles with about a 2" strip of plastic tape glued across the two ends. This method seems to work well, but the key is, of course, that plastic tape. I'm using strapping tape, the kind that is used for shipping, that has that cloth/fiberglass strands embedded in it. I would prefer something else, but I haven't found it yet.

    I fully coat the back side of the two ends with two part epoxy. I happen to be using Devcon, but I'm sure any type will do as long as it is not the five-minute variety. For some reason the quicker it sets up, the less the strength. Get the 8 to 12 hour version. Then place the tape over the joint. Put wax paper on both sides and using two pieces of flat wood, C-clamp everything together.

    On my first trial runs, I found that if I left the belt under tension in the machine, over time the glued joint would begin to slip apart. The culprit turned out to be the tape adhesive. It apparently does not get along too well with the epoxy. So far the answer is to clean as much adhesive off of the tape as possible with acetone. You're not going to be using it anyway, as the epoxy is the bonding agent.

    So far I'm having success with as large as 1 1/2" emery cloth that you get at Harbor Freight. That stuff is about as stiff and cheap as you can get, and it is still holding.

    Let me know if you need any pics, and I'll see what I can dig up.
    My guess is that the 5 min. epoxy sets before it has a chance to soak into the belt fabric so it is only on the surface. The slower curing stuff, besides being stronger, gets a better grip.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk


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