How Much Anchoring for 8" 3/4 HP Buffer?
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    198
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default How Much Anchoring for 8" 3/4 HP Buffer?

    I just picked up a Baldor 332B buffer with a Baldor G14 stand with shelves. This is an 1800-RPM 3/4 HP buffer that takes up to 8" wheels.

    The stand is obviously too small at the base to allow me to use the buffer safely without some other support. I am hoping to avoid drilling my floor because I know every time I pick a place for the buffer, it will turn out to be the wrong place, and I'll have to move it.

    How much anchoring does a machine like this have to have in order to make it reasonably safe? I was thinking I might attach a wide, flat base to it and add casters with brakes. Or I could take it off the stand and put it on a solid workbench.

    I can't really say what I plan to buff with it. I am going to put a wire wheel on one side and use the other side for buffing. Whatever needs to be buffed will be buffed. I plan to use sisal, spiral stitched wheels, loose cotton wheels, and canton flannel.

    The machine has a box with a switch on it. I assume it's magnetic. I am wondering if I really need that for a home shop. I was thinking I'd rather have a modern paddle switch.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    4,727
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2488
    Likes (Received)
    2291

    Default

    If you are worried, bolt it to a sheet of steel that sticks out of the front and stand on said sheet when using the buffer.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    198
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default

    I wouldn't say I'm worried. I am just hoping to get this right by seeking information BEFORE I do something stupid.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    4,727
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2488
    Likes (Received)
    2291

    Default

    Having had a shaper start to walk across the floor today, I understand the problem!

    Standing on an extended base will work in this case. Since you are holding the part yourself it'll be as rigid as you are. It's also reasonably portable because you can skid the whole lot across the floor if needed.

  5. Likes AD Design liked this post
  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    British Columbia
    Posts
    9
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    I have a large Baldor grinder that isn't anchored, but the stand I made weighs probably 200 lbs and there is a sheet of 3/4" steel for the base (not big enough that I am standing on, but this is a good idea. It weighs enough not to tip over, but concrete floors are often not flat, hence I have to shim for rock because I don't bolt it down. Whatever you choose, be sure you think of a design that allows for leveling as you should consider rocking/movement as well as tipping if you aren't bolting it down.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Langley, B.C.
    Posts
    1,643
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    328
    Likes (Received)
    961

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by VanCan View Post
    I have a large Baldor grinder that isn't anchored, but the stand I made weighs probably 200 lbs and there is a sheet of 3/4" steel for the base (not big enough that I am standing on, but this is a good idea. It weighs enough not to tip over, but concrete floors are often not flat, hence I have to shim for rock because I don't bolt it down. Whatever you choose, be sure you think of a design that allows for leveling as you should consider rocking/movement as well as tipping if you aren't bolting it down.
    Continuing with this line of thought I have an older 3-phase grinder that I picked up years ago. It has a pretty heavy cast iron
    base/stand that it sits on but the actual footprint of the base isn't really that large. It's never had any tendency to tip over in all
    the years I've used it...


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •