Moving Surface Grinder
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  1. #1
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    Default Moving Surface Grinder

    Next weekend I'm going to take a look at a Boyar Schultz 2A618 grinder, and if it isn't completely worn out, I'll most likely purchase it. It is the same as the one on this site, although much, much dirtier - 6" X 18" Boyar-Schultz 2A618, Hydraulic Surface Grinder, 1 Hp, Coolant, Auto Lube, 71360 Grinders, Surface Reciprocating Table (Horizontal Spindle) - SurplusRecord.com

    The info I'd like to know prior to going down, is how to pick one of these up with a forklift. Are there bolt holes I can screw in a lug or bolt a chain? If so, any idea on the bolt size? I couldn't find a manual either, so if anyone can shed any light on this, I'd be very appreciative.

    And one more thing, if anyone cares to weigh in on anything specific with this model I should be watching out for, that would be great.

    Many thanks in advance.

    Brandon

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  3. #2
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    I think that you have had no replies as this is basic stuff.

    So here goes. these are suggestions this is not a fully thought out lifting scheme.

    For moving it to your vehicle I would not sling it. Far better to put it on the forks of a pallet jack, I prefer this as I have full control not being a FLT driver. Another method is to build a dolly it's just a solid base with castor wheels make it bigger than then foot print of the base with the castors outside the foot print for stability. 4" wheels will be fine if your surface is good. STRAP IT DOWN

    First you need to determine if the ways are on rollers or if it's conventional cast iron to cast iron. If it's rollers youthen will need to remove the saddle etc otherwise the vibration Of transport wil brinell the ways. If leaving the saddle etc on you will need to secure them to prevent them sliding off if the machine tips etc. ratchet straps are good for this.

    You will need to get the machine up on blocks to get the pallet jack or FLT forks under it. This is usually achieved with a long pry bar to lift one side a 1/4" or so to get a wedge under you repeat this all round. You can continue with wedges or better us a toe jack and flat pieces of wood say 1/2" thick at time to gradually lif tow opposing side until you can get the forks under. Then you do the reverse with jack until it's settled on the forks. STRAP IT to prevent it sliding off the forks if you hit a bump as it WILL slide again the ratchet straps are useful here.


    You will need to think about how you are going to unload it as this will determine how you put it on the vehicle If you do need to Lift it by slinging this need real care and attention. On my grinder some one has tapped the casting on the sides high up on tha base so that lifting points can be bolted on. These lifting eyes were just made from steel and not load rated, this might not be legal where you are.

    In the Uk we can hire vehicle with tail lifts really cheaply. You might also consider getting someone to quote for moving it. So many machines have been ruined in preventable accidents when moving.

    Look up Abom79 on YouTube he move machines in the ways I have described. Remember if it doesn't feel right it's not right.

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    Re QT Tray: [ STRAP IT to prevent it sliding off the forks if you hit a bump as it WILL slide again the ratchet straps are useful here.] Good for everybody to note ..the old saying is Steel on Steel is Like Skates on Ice.. just putting on the brakes can make a 2000+ machine slide off forks.

    Common practice is to put on a wheel and down feed to where the down nut is free, the wheel on a block of wood. The wheel can break /and the wood cushion if there is a mishap and the machine takes a hard bump or fall.
    Always start a setting spindle with a few hand and jog starts.
    Research grinding a chuck if you or your guys have not done that before.

    Some guys regrind the set pad..but at least fine side hone + oil, and check it for flat.
    Hone and check your chuck bottom ..if you don't grind it. (I don't grind the pad every time)

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    Thank you for the responses. Certainly some good recommendations and things to think about. Just trying to be prepared as best I can. Man, I sure wish I could find a manual on this grinder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_CNC_guy View Post
    Yes, I have run across those links, but other than the brochure, there isn't any specific info regarding lifting. Thank you for posting them though.

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    Not sure where my previous post went, but yes, I've run across those links. Unfortunately, the 2A618 manual isn't there. It is shown in the brochure, but no owners manual with any rigging or moving info. Thanks for the post though!

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    Not sure about the grinder you're looking at but the smaller one's I've moved (Harig, Doall) always sat loosely on the sheet metal cabinet. There was nothing permanently mounting them together and no provisions for such. Just something to be aware of when you strap it down and move it. I like to move the pieces separately when able (overhead sling) but it really depends how much room you have to move it.

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    Fork lift under, an easy move. It is not top heavy.
    Never seen one of these with ball or roller ways but look under the table.
    If normal ways bring the spindle housing down of a 4x4 piece of wood and block the table with medium pressure. This is just to keep things from bouncing or moving around in the truck.
    Bob

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    I had a Boyar Schultz 612 years ago and while there were leveling bolts between the cabinet and machine base they were hollow and there were thru bolts that unified the grinder and cabinet... unless someone left them out, always a possibility. There were also features (can't remember exactly what) that allowed picking it up with the forks tight to the sides of the machine base. It was a real easy machine to move... just drive up to it and drive away with it.

    All those machines were built with cast iron ways, but at least one was retrofitted with ball ways and it didn't cost me all that much. I got the impression from the shop that did it that it was a common fix for when the ways got too worn to easily scrape in. If it has ball ways you'll want to move it with the table off.
    Dennis

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    When I bought my Harig and pick it up myself, fortunately the shop had fork lift. We put it on an oversized pallet and block in the base screwing 2” x 4” in to the pallet. Sliding it up against the front of box, ran screws through the pallet into the box van wood floor. Then strapped it against front wall. I made from Phoenix to the Denver without it moving. Even with paying to have a rigger unloaded, it saved me money.

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    I have one 'co-located' elsewhere, but I moved it a few times.

    There is a sling-based method you can do with a forklift (from above) that gets around the 'sliding off forks' risk. Factory-approved sling locations:

    (From paragraph 2 of the linked manual above)

    "Lift the machine by means of the cross feed handwheel housing and the two lifting studs found on the sides. Lifting in any other manner may damage the machine. The lifting studs may be un-screwed when the machine is permanently situated. "

    If it's bolted to the cabinet base, it is easy and safe to lift the base with the machine. (Unload base if the stuff is fragile or heavy.)

    It can be tippy/top-heavy when lifted from below. Lifting with slings from above avoids this. The lifting studs are towards the back of the machine casting, just about where the number 8 is in the photo in the manual.

    Strap the table down with ratchet straps so it doesn't move/bounce/etc. Most are without bearings.

    (If base is removed, it will fit in the back of a Suburban -- barely, and with difficulty.)

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    That jogged my memory, the crossfeed screw housing being the third pick point. While I recognize the danger of things slipping off the forks, there are also dangers having a machine dangling below the forks. In our case, since the grinding room only had a standard 7' tall door opening, it made more sense to pick the machine by the base. We spread the forks just wide enough to straddle the base casting, then used a stout oak 2x4 (salvaged from an oak pallet) across the forks under the crossfeed housing. The jeep had just enough tilt to lift the machine level, and with the angle of the forks, would try to slid back toward the mast rather than off. A couple more blocks on the forks kept the crossfeed handwheel away from the mast cylinder.

    The quick and easy way to immobilize the table is to lower the spindle housing (NOT the grinding wheel) down onto a wood block on the grinding chuck.

    I seem to recall taking the grinder off the base to move it in a closed U-haul trailer, but that may have been more so it couldn't tip over than an overhead clearance problem. I never trust strapping things to the walls of those trailers; too flimsy.

    Dennis


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