New to me Brown and Sharpe 510 need advise
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,303
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    170
    Likes (Received)
    160

    Default New to me Brown and Sharpe 510 need advise

    I have just got my "new" B&S 510 grinder working. I ran a rough and ready test last night on a piece of unknowium with the wheel that came on the machine.

    For a machine that hasn't been levelled or the wheel dressed, it looked pretty good. Less than 0.0005 difference corner to corner.

    So, 2 questions:
    1) what would be a good general purpose wheel to buy? Mostly just want good surface finish on steel.
    2) the machine is set up for coolant. what should I be using?

    Thanks for any and all advise

    Peter

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    14,123
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4814
    Likes (Received)
    5089

    Default

    46k white aluminum oxide is a good choice for much work. ( 46H through L is a good range).

    60 and 80gt. gives a very good surface but are not for taking rapid stock removal and they tend to heat the part or cause a surface burn. Surface burns are a bugger because they warp a part and then making the part straight again is a big waste of time.

    but 46gt won't give a tight (small radius inside corner) So when you need a step shoulder an 80grt wheel might be good to go in and just take the bit of the corner..it is near impossible to grind a dead right angle sharp inside corner.

    I think a biodegradable coolant is best so you don't contaminate my fishing.

    Best to not rush into grinding the chuck if you are new to grinding. likely you will burn it.

    Ring test every wheel and use a blotter on both sides.

    Tighten the wheel as tight as you can with one hand on the wheel and one hand on a wrench. Then set the wrench end on a block and make it just a litter tighter using two hands on the wheel.

    If you change a wheel dress it right then..never walk away for an undressed wheel.

    wheel stuff
    Hardness - Elbe Schleiftechnik GmbH

    ELBE, a medium-sized company based in the Greater Stuttgart area, has been producing high-quality grinding tools for over 100 years.

  3. Likes shapeaholic liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,303
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    170
    Likes (Received)
    160

    Default

    Thanks Buck!
    Any brandname wheel you like the best?

    I got lots to learn;-)

    Peter

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    14,123
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4814
    Likes (Received)
    5089

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shapeaholic View Post
    Thanks Buck!
    Any brandname wheel you like the best?

    I got lots to learn;-)

    Peter
    I would have posted you a couple of wheels but UPS to Ontario starts at $47 from here to Ontario so not worth doing.
    I picked up some Carbundrum 46Ls at an auction that are really great.

    Any name-brand wheel would be good. Used wheels are fine because a ring test proves them safe if the list RPM matches your grinders spindle. Likely you will find white and pink wheels very good, Brown wheels last longer but most often run hotter, Blue wheeks are good but you are not likely to find any. Green wheels are for carbide but far not as good as a diamond wheel. Radiak, Norton, Carburundrun, and many other old brand names are good.

    Really study Chuck grinding before you try doing that because it is easy to mess up the job..

  6. Likes ballen, shapeaholic liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,465
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4348
    Likes (Received)
    4088

    Default

    Pete -
    Buck sent me some Radiac (brand) white/vitrified wheels a few years ago and i liked them better than Norton. Seemed sharper, somewhat freer cutting. In fact, of the 3 he listed, i would rank them Radiac, Corborundum, and then Norton. But they all are good.

    I like 46J for most grinding. It's productive and cool, finish depends as much on dress and method of grinding as on the grit.
    If you need to grind primarily for cosmetic, there are other bonds that might be applicable
    Most prefer softer wheels, but IME H is too soft for most apps. Used to use I. Discovered a cache of NOS Waltham 46J-8 locally about a year ago and have been getting them 11 ea for $50. Can you use 7" wheels on your B & S or does it take 6"?

    I think ultimately, each person settles on their own preference based on their machine, process, & typical work. But for most of us that will end up Vitrified bond wheels between 60 - 36 (love 36 for hogging), & H to maybe K hardness. Reasonably open wheels, somewhere between 8 & up structure (porosity). If your work includes spinning shanks & shafts, the slightly harder wheels, K & L will hold up a little better for OD's. Still, for me, I or J does most of it.

    I liked Cimcool 95 in the bigger grinder/flood.
    Trim mist on the smaller grinder which is not set up for flood.
    Not sure if Buck will haunt me now, though.
    Will investigate the green options for next pail.
    Definitely favor a better environment for all.


    smt

  8. Likes michiganbuck, ballen, shapeaholic liked this post
  9. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    14,123
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4814
    Likes (Received)
    5089

    Default

    QT Stephen: [Most prefer softer wheels, but IME H is too soft for most apps.]

    I agree about the H. Many say go soft for hard work, but you get to the point that the work is harder than the wheel can penetrate so you use a ton of wheel and time. Often taking more dresses, extra off the part over-travel will satisfy the work with less wheel and time using the harder wheel.

    QT; [Not sure if Buck will haunt me now, though.] No reason to haunt but I might come and pan all the gold out of the creek that goes through your neighborhood. I thought that white wheel I sent you was a Carborundum 46L. If I get a chance I will go out in my wheels and check..perhaps send a few to prove it (if I'm right?).
    Buck

    PS,
    I could tell you a story about gold but then everybody would know.

  10. Likes stephen thomas liked this post
  11. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    downhill from Twain\'s study outside Elmira, NY
    Posts
    11,465
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4348
    Likes (Received)
    4088

    Default

    Buck -

    In the ongoing renovations here to install my wife's antique 9' Brunswick pool table, i have had to put 4 steel I-beams under the house.
    2 of them pass through the (ahem) "grinding department". So had to take all the dozens and dozens of wheels down from nails into the joists and store them in 5 gal buckets. Then i put them back up, mostly, but they are all mixed up since the steel interfered with previous locations in my careful catalogued storage system. :^) Anyway, will try to remember to see if i can locate them, and report back on who is right about brand. You sent me at least 2, might have been 3.

    Happy to split whatever valuable minerals you can pan out of this creek.
    All we find is fossils.

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    ch
    Posts
    3,355
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    278
    Likes (Received)
    469

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    46k white aluminum oxide is a good choice for much work. ( 46H through L is a good range).

    60 and 80gt. gives a very good surface but are not for taking rapid stock removal and they tend to heat the part or cause a surface burn. Surface burns are a bugger because they warp a part and then making the part straight again is a big waste of time.

    but 46gt won't give a tight (small radius inside corner) So when you need a step shoulder an 80grt wheel might be good to go in and just take the bit of the corner..it is near impossible to grind a dead right angle sharp inside corner.

    I think a biodegradable coolant is best so you don't contaminate my fishing.

    Best to not rush into grinding the chuck if you are new to grinding. likely you will burn it.

    Ring test every wheel and use a blotter on both sides.

    Tighten the wheel as tight as you can with one hand on the wheel and one hand on a wrench. Then set the wrench end on a block and make it just a litter tighter using two hands on the wheel.

    If you change a wheel dress it right then..never walk away for an undressed wheel.

    wheel stuff
    Hardness - Elbe Schleiftechnik GmbH

    ELBE, a medium-sized company based in the Greater Stuttgart area, has been producing high-quality grinding tools for over 100 years.
    i wonder how you came up with "elbe". do you buy from them?

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    14,123
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4814
    Likes (Received)
    5089

    Default

    QT: I wonder how you came up with "Elbe". do you buy from them?

    No, I came across their wheels and so researched the name, Figured a German outfit would be worth checking out.

    They have good information on wheels...but they might have added that Walnut shells were an early method of adding porosity to grinding wheels. You grind the up to different grain sizes and then mix them in your wheel mix before firing the wheel. At firing to melt the clay the walnut grains disappear and so leave an empty space.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •