Long shot: Suggest a 3D printer - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 31 of 31
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Posts
    505
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    100
    Likes (Received)
    156

    Default

    I bought a Sidewinder X1 this year and its been working great. Looked at prusa first but really wanted 300mm x 300mm. Hard to believe something so cheap can work so well.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Country
    SLOVAKIA
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    We've got a pair of Prusas at work - i3MK2S that I mostly use and i3MK3 that's mostly a colleague's bailliwick - basically i've tuned the settings for the older one to the point I'm super happy with the output and don't feel like switching any day.

    They're reasonable priced, especially if you buy the kit and assemble yourself, and the manufacturer (yes, he's almost a countryman, we used to be one state until 1993 but I'm totally not shilling :P) provides all kinds of neat things like .stl files for replacement parts that are plastic which comes handy for repair, a customized slicer programme and also, material spools that have been quite hard to beat in terms of price and are good quality.

    The design of his printer is widely replicated so you might end up getting mostly the same for much cheaper, but the quality of the hardware and software is good which is not a guarantee elsewhere (looking at you XYZprinting), they do all kinds of nice things like offer upgrade kits for your older machines, and ultimately, I also feel better for our (or our workplace's) money going to someone who actually designed these things rather than to copycat mass producers.

    Asides from PLA, one similarly priced and perhaps a little overlooked material is PETG. It's about the same price, and a joy to work with - great mechanical and chemical/enviro resistance properties, holds well (sometimes too well - washing the foil with windex is recommended to get the right amount of adhesion) to the printing mat, and most importantly - unlike ABS it doesn't warp as it cools, leading to very good verisimilitude of prints. I make most parts that I produce out of it - the printers have been invaluable in making both replacement plastic parts and a variety of holders and similar things that would be annoying to machine, either due to quantity or due to the nature of the operations.

    Hopefully this little post helped someone.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Country
    UKRAINE
    Posts
    15
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    I bought a Sidewinder X1 this year and its been working great. Looked at prusa first but really wanted 300mm x 300mm. Hard to believe something so cheap can work so well.
    I read that this printer is very easy to assemble and operate. Is this true?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Posts
    505
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    100
    Likes (Received)
    156

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by souza13alex View Post
    I read that this printer is very easy to assemble and operate. Is this true?
    Yes its mostly assembled. The gantry is not attached, just need to bolt that on and plug in a few wires. Maybe 15-20 mins to put it together. Then few minutes to level the bed and its up and running. Ive gone through about 8-9 rolls of PLA filiment and no issues. Never had to touch leveling screws since initial setup. Prints stick to the glass bed just fine, and come off easily when cool. Only ever had one failed print which was due to under extrusion. Just needed to increase tension a little on the feed roller and everything fine again.

    This thing is great for the price. Cant beat it for first 3d printer. So many great features like the big work envelope, direct drive extruder, AC heated glass bed, touchscreen interface, usb instead of SD cards, etc etc. Also love that it doesnt have any 3d printed parts on it. Cant believe the prusa is built with so many printed parts. 3D printers are great, but I hate seeing 3d printed parts on finished products.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Connecticut
    Posts
    40
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    38
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mmurray70 View Post
    Cant believe the prusa is built with so many printed parts. 3D printers are great, but I hate seeing 3d printed parts on finished products.
    The one benefit I think the end users see from prusa using so many 3d printed parts is they have 600 machines running prints 24hrs a day, which means they have lots of opportunity to see problems with printers and fix them. I know most of us have an idea of how much work it takes to get a few CNC machines running reliably enough to not worry about them, I can't imagine keeping 600 machines running free of error.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Missouri, USA
    Posts
    2,153
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1369
    Likes (Received)
    2746

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pariel View Post
    Honestly 3D printing services are so cheap that unless you really think you have volume, you should just pay someone else to print it for you.

    I've probably had a hundred parts printed this year, and I could maybe buy the CR-10S that's in my basement for what I spent. Meanwhile I spent zero minutes setting up a printer for any of those jobs. From a dollars stand point I think it's really a no brainer.
    I disagree entirely.

    Probably the biggest benefit of 3D Printing is quick iteration of ideas. Introduce shipping times and queues in someone else's shop and you just blew that. We outsource the manufacture of some 3D printed PARTS but that's mainly because the final product ended up being SLS'd nylon, and all we have is a FDM machine.

    Another is for "I need it now" parts. There's a lot of jobs where a PLA/PETG soft jaw would work great, but you need it now... not when it ships to you. Money wise, I think it's peanuts compared to time. The cost savings in outsourcing vs buying a printer and using it yourself, is potatoes compared to the time and OPPORTUNITY difference.

    I would recommend a Prusa... we have some "higher end" "professional grade" machines and the designs are lackluster and sometimes faulty. The Prusa's are benefitting from the design expertise of the world, and the iteration of experiments by GOBS of testers and hobbyists, many of whom ARE actually smart with this stuff, and not just some yokel tinkering around to make toys with it.

    Prusas are reliable, proven, and the support is fantastic. Highly recommend. The times we've had to print parts for work, on our home, personal Prusas, because the Raise3D at work is a piece of shit, is too damn high.

    Anwyay... yea, a Prusa is cheap, and none of the higher priced machines are worth the money. There's no value in them beyond what is in a Prusa, (some of them don't have AS MUCH value as a Prusa...) and so the extra cost is not worth it.

  7. Likes Zahnrad Kopf, bryan_machine liked this post
  8. #27
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wyoming
    Posts
    3,590
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8937
    Likes (Received)
    5837

    Default

    My 2¢ worth is that, while the $29K Stratasys Objet 30 machine we bought a few years ago did give us the short response time of having an in-house printer when we needed one to make foundry pattern masters, it turned out to be a maintenance pig. Next time (assuming there is a next time) I think I'd rather have a coarser-resolution weedwacker-string ABS printer and live with the hand finishing. Re the Prusa, what is "cheap?"

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    844
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    156

    Default

    I bought the prusa mk3 kit, was 799 I think.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Missouri, USA
    Posts
    2,153
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1369
    Likes (Received)
    2746

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tomjelly View Post
    I bought the prusa mk3 kit, was 799 I think.
    Yep. All together, with an extra build sheet, mine came in just under $800 to my door from CZ, as of almost 2 years ago, I've had it, now

    I call that cheap, for the value it represents. I bought one for the hell of it for the home, and to use to teach my kid (turned 14 today) CAD modeling and design, when he's so inclined. When I got our first 3D Printers ($250 XYZ Printing years ago... it was a good idea at the time) I even used it to print some Lego stuff for him, including gears. He needed a specific gear size we didn't have, so I was able to find a model online quickly and print it in about an hour on that cheap slow thing.

    Anyway, $800 and it's a machine that can do truly professional grade FFF/FDM parts. I honestly don't think you can get any significantly better quality and reliability without doing a custom build, which is why I am so opposed to any FFF/FDM printer that costs more than $1k.

    Now, if you start getting into multi-jet fusion stuff... or SLS... that's a whole other ball game and this entire conversation becomes a bit moot.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    844
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    156

    Default

    Yes, I want one of those 4 laser powder bed fusion ones like they use here:
    HOME | Athertons
    (Click on technology)

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    5,542
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3684
    Likes (Received)
    4340

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tomjelly View Post
    I bought the prusa mk3 kit, was 799 I think.
    lots rave about them, mine was a nightmare. Roll after roll of wasted material as filament would jam part way through a print. Worst was the nasty shit cheap fasteners they used on the heater. Its necessary to disassemble it to fix a jam, and being cheap nasty shit they would strip. As these fasteners disconnect the heater and thermistor, drilling them out had to be done in situ because the wires couldn't be detached until the fasteners we removed.

    I sent them a long piece on it, like an engineers NCR, complete with measurements and photos and the response was "try restarting" & "have you upgraded the software". Idiots.

    I finally figured out the issue, they had modified and put a step in the inside dimensions of the heat break (i.e. they didn't make the parts exactly to the E3d v6 drawings). Replaced it with a proper one and its worked fairly well. ...but I'm pissed at how I had figure out how to make a not-cheap printer actually work, and the shit cheap fasteners that made it miserable to work on. The e3d design also deserve some criticism, given the location of the socket fasteners (easily get filled with plastic when something goes wrong making the unit more difficult to dismantle to fix)

    pics and more description here. The Shop - Metallum if you get a Prusa lemon like I did, this'll save months of frustration


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •