1882 Hendey Info
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  1. #1
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    Default 1882 Hendey Info

    1st post.

    Hello to all!
    Kinda long winded.

    Unit in question:

    1882 Hendey Machine Co
    Torrington CT USA
    Serial tag - 8496

    Me: I am new to posting to forums. I use them on all my new adventures and even when Iím curious as to why I do every day things the way I do compared to others. I enjoy new information!
    Sorry for the intro.

    Internet to the rescue!

    I noticed Hendeyman post information helping others identify their machines. Not sure if he has access to more information than a lay person or if anyone else may know anything about this machine. Itís in good shape.

    I know value is pretty much whatever someone is willing to pay but still wonder if it is one of those $500 or $5k or in betweeners. I know my Ford Pinto isnt worth much money at all but it is still priceless to me.

    Any info, history, whatever anyone knows will be appreciated greatly. I can take photos and whatever else if it will aid in identification and more information. (I probably should have just posted some pictures, whoops..)
    Is this something that a light tinkerer would use or something a more seasoned heavier user would use?

    What I kind of know pertaining to this unit:
    Something about 1882 being the year they introduced a changeable gear box? Then the little information I did find said they didnít need to go further into that reference as whoever is into these machines will know the relevance... meaning? haha so the pre 1882 were non changing?

    So I came across this site and ended my search for the evening. So many questions and so little time!

    Thanks for your time and knowledge.

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperrSteeve View Post
    Something about 1882 being the year they introduced a changeable gear box?
    Seems that should be 1892?

    Or, to quote them from an early twenties catalog:

    QUICK CHANGE GEAR ENGINE LATHES HAVE BEEN MANUFACTURED AND PROGRESSIVELY IMPROVED BY THIS COMPANY SINCE THE YEAR 1892
    They made - at least - shapers, planers and lathes. Probably help to say which

    Serial tag - 8496
    Hendey serials - to the best of my knowledge - were stamped into machined cast iron

  4. #3
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    SuperrSteeve:

    Welcome to the Forum.

    Except for the history of a particular Hendey product, you will find a great deal of valuable information in the Archives relating to
    various Hendey machines. Considering that the production of Friction shapers of all sizes never exceeded 6775, that Geared shapers did
    not exceed 4000 and that all other products combined, except the lathes, weren't even in the running, I will guess that you are talking
    about a lathe and a Cone Head model at that. My thanks to John Odor for correcting the introduction date for W. P. Norton's Quick Change
    Gear Box.

    Hendey lathe No.8496, a 14 x 6 Cone Head model, was completed on October 6, 1906. It was shipped with a Taper Attachment. I can't tell
    you the name of the original owner because the machine was sold to Hendey's West Coast Selling Agent, Pacific Tool and Supply Company. No city or state was listed, but I think they were locsted in San Francisco, California. There are no longer any Patterns, Castings or Repair Parts left in inventory for this lathe, but all of the original drawings are stkll in the files, so parts can be made if required. This lathe should have the Compound Gear box, introduced in 1904, the Tie Bar Headstock introduced in 1905, the 6 threads per inch Leadscrew, introduced September 24, 1903, the new Carriage and Cross slide, introduced on June 23, 1906, the 2-1/4 inch Spindle Nose and just maybe, the 2-1/2 Morse Taper Center for the Tailstock.

    Hendeyman

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  6. #4
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    Miscellaneous related goodies

    Somewhat later "manual" - thanks to Greg Menke for hosting this for me

    http://pounceatron.dreamhosters.com/...dey-manual.pdf

    My old write up on their lead screw reverse / threading system - starts at post #17 in the linked thread

    Hendey lathe "emergency"!

    Great old pub full of generic info on running old lathes

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/5795.pdf

    ph

  7. #5
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    Thanks John and Hendey. I had taken some photos but will have to research if I can/how to post them. Tried the ole copy and paste and of course it didnít work.

    I showed the pictures to a friend and he said itís an old lathe and asked what all Ďattachmentsí I had. In which I replied, whatever came with it. And come to find out thatís not a very good answer haha

    Hendey, it says Ď7 times thread per inchí on the unit. So I searched this site again and I just so happened to see you had a convo on another thread (in 2015) with someone asking about his being 7xís tpi instead of 4 or 6 and you had a good explanation of what it all meant.

    Iím going to start off with some basic hands on and understanding the equipment before I waste too much more of everyoneís time. Iíll be reading up as much as I can as well. Thank you very much both of you!


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