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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Michaels View Post
    It is typical of large firms to minimize, or totally deny hazards from substances that they work with.
    I recently watched the film 'Dark Waters', it covers DuPonts doings with Teflon-C8 back in the day, sobering stuff.

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    Just going to piggyback this here since crystaline silica and asbestos share largely the same history. To put things into perspective, this film is from 1938. Legislators have known about the dangers of silica dust for 80+ years. We only just got workplace legislation in the US mandating that employers must provide workers with HEPA vacs, masks, etc. for dusty work around 2016 or so. Just a couple of years ago it was extremely rare to see Hammer-Vacs or any other dust collection means being employed for hammer-drilling. The dust and chips just blew right into your face and that was that. Now hammer-drilling is clean. All drills have vacs and 95-98% of the dust gets trapped before it ever reaches your face.

    80 years just to attach a small vacuum to a hammer drill.

    80.



    On a side note, asbestos isn't actually banned in a broad sense. You can still buy the stuff as a commercial product - just not in frangible form.

    Asbestos Roof Coating. Asbestoseal From Liquasil Ltd 0121 709 5352

    And a final note on OSHA airborne silica testing - the inspectors *always* take an ambient air sample at a random time of day, rather than one right at the point of work while said work is being performed. I would argue that a lot of the airborne dust testing that is regularly performed today for things like indoor saw-cutting drastically under-represents the actual hazard which exists for the poor sod working next to that 15~25 horsepower concrete saw or floor grinder, wet or not. Wet saws produce very fine silica-laden airborne water droplets which dry out and evaporate as they disperse throughout the jobsite, releasing free silica into the air for everyone else to breathe.

    But what the hell do I know - I'm just a damn dirty electrician. Shut up and keep roughing in next to the block layers' saw, right?
    Last edited by Just a Sparky; 05-08-2021 at 06:11 PM.

  3. #63
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    I am very likely a product of a series of jobs that weren't very healthy..............started with clutches and brakes for fleet operators, at one time, two of us did all the brakes on a combined fleet of >100 vehicles. Mix in paint and bodywork on occasion. A stint in an underground coalmine. Dept of Labor does chest x-rays every 5 years to keep tabs............my last one showed thickening of the lining around my lungs consistent with mesothelioma. I've been on asthma meds for some years before that, helped quite a bit
    Never smoked........didn't figure that I should push it

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    I worked in a factory actually producing asbestos products as a youth. I got out as soon as I could. Next step was a large electrical engineering company producing circuit breakers etc. They had an asbestos component department that I did my best to keep away from.
    After that I was into repairing machine tools, sometimes scraping ferrobestos ways overhead etc.
    So I’ve had my share of the killer dust along with tons of grinding various things including stellite by hand.
    My lungs aren’t great and I use an inhaler once a day but I’m still here. I just wish masks would have been more prevalent back in my early days, them and knee pads !

    Regards Tyrone.

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    I was a bit apprehensive about starting the coal mine job, already had a COPD diagnosis, Dept of Labor does a chest x-ray going in to establish a baseline for future x-rays. I was doing pretty well on the meds and did well breathing wise while there. It was a longwall operation, so they were moving a lot of air. On the occasions when we were rock dusting, the guy with me always wanted to run the hose, so I ran the car pumping rock dust (which kept me in good air) most of the time, you could stay out of the dust cloud by taking advantage of air movement, but sometimes you were in neutral air.

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    In fact ,the danger of dust and silicosis has been known for a thousand years..... Sheffield blade grinders and polishers had a special dispensation to marry at 12 yrs,and life expectancy was under 30 yrs.

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    It's interesting to read this thread...you can see a lot of people have common sense but then there are always that group who must inject their fear and lack of reason into the world. They usually do this from a stance of 'superior intellect'. These are the same people who think life is all about just finally finding the right corporation to sue. It's better than winning the lottery, even, because when you win a settlement you get money but also righteous indignation.


    Anyway....a distant relative, through marriage, in his mid-thirties....ran his own exterminating business, very successful. Started feeling very sick, turns out he had something like 2% liver capacity. Doctors said it was from having his hands in the bug spray every day for years. He's still alive but screwed up for life. Then, Edith lived across the street from our shop for 87 years until she died of old age....her house - the one she was born in and lived in for 87 years - was fully insulated with asbestos.


    I love it when the liberal/hippie crowd gets their panties in a wad over some corporate evil (like asbestos) but sees no problem with their decades of drug use and the millions of deaths that causes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    It's interesting to read this thread...you can see a lot of people have common sense but then there are always that group who must inject their fear and lack of reason into the world. They usually do this from a stance of 'superior intellect'. These are the same people who think life is all about just finally finding the right corporation to sue. It's better than winning the lottery, even, because when you win a settlement you get money but also righteous indignation.


    Anyway....a distant relative, through marriage, in his mid-thirties....ran his own exterminating business, very successful. Started feeling very sick, turns out he had something like 2% liver capacity. Doctors said it was from having his hands in the bug spray every day for years. He's still alive but screwed up for life. Then, Edith lived across the street from our shop for 87 years until she died of old age....her house - the one she was born in and lived in for 87 years - was fully insulated with asbestos.


    I love it when the liberal/hippie crowd gets their panties in a wad over some corporate evil (like asbestos) but sees no problem with their decades of drug use and the millions of deaths that causes.
    It's easy money though for a lot of them and after all, it is getting even with the evil people who just make things to steal money with after purposely killing people in the process....

    Many young skulls full of mush tell me that my white lead I use on my dead centers for my lathe, lead that I cast bullets from, the neighbor's house next door that has asbestos siding on it, all of that is going to kill me.. Well I got a check up today..I am 68 and have been obese for most of my life..Smoked for 15 years, was around asbestos in clutches, crane frictions, brake bands, etc, chemicals, paint fumes, blasting sand, welding fumes, etc.. My bp is 136/81 with no medication and the doc listened to my lungs and he said they sound fine.. I asked him how many asbestos clutches he heard rattling around in my lungs and he said wow were you ever around asbestos? Well Hell's bells, when I die at least maybe my back will stop hurting! Cheers from a grouchy old man in Louisiana, Ramsay 1

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    Lot's of things, like lead, coal, pistols, even sticks of dynamite, are not going to jump up off a table and kill you. Asbestos that is contained in some sort of stuff, as with tiles, siding, etc, won't either.

    Lead moving fast, asbestos blowing in the wind, or sticks of dynamite that are either wired up to exploders, or are leaking fluid..... all things I prefer to be away from.

    Context is everything

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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Lot's of things, like lead, coal, pistols, even sticks of dynamite, are not going to jump up off a table and kill you. Asbestos that is contained in some sort of stuff, as with tiles, siding, etc, won't either.

    Lead moving fast, asbestos blowing in the wind, or sticks of dynamite that are either wired up to exploders, or are leaking fluid..... all things I prefer to be away from.

    Context is everything
    LOL Dunno about that... Had one guy tell me the chuck on my 1941 LeBlond lathe is going to unscrew and fall on my foot so I better change the spindle to a cam loc.. Danger is everywhere.. lol.. Cheers.. Ramsay 1

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    I'd prefer a cam-loc, but that might not be reason #1...........

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    When I was young and foolish I allowed myself to get covered in asbestos fibres like a snowman a couple of times. That was part of the working environment when you worked on maintenance.

    OK, I’m still here, but would I allow that state of affairs to occur again ? I think we all know the answer to that one.

    A couple of the guys I worked with back then subsequently died of asbestos related disease. Not a nice way to go.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    When I was young and foolish I allowed myself to get covered in asbestos fibres like a snowman a couple of times. That was part of the working environment when you worked on maintenance.

    OK, I’m still here, but would I allow that state of affairs to occur again ? I think we all know the answer to that one.

    A couple of the guys I worked with back then subsequently died of asbestos related disease. Not a nice way to go.

    Regards Tyrone.
    What is a good way to go? Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by ramsay1 View Post
    What is a good way to go? Cheers
    “Every gambler knows
    That the secret to survivin'
    Is knowin' what to throw away
    And knowin' what to keep
    'Cause every hand's a winner
    And every hand's a loser
    And the best that you can hope for
    Is to die in your sleep"

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    Quote Originally Posted by ramsay1 View Post
    What is a good way to go? Cheers
    I can tell you gasping for breath like a landed fish isn’t one of them.

    A friend of ours died of asbestosis. He been ill for a while but one day we were told if we wanted to see him before he died we had to get over to the hospital ASAP. We got there at 1-00 pm and saw him briefly, it wasn’t pleasant. We were intending to go back at 6-00pm. We got a phone call at 4-30 telling us he’d died. It was a blessing for him, and for us.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Neighbor died while having sex.. Doctor told him to cut it out but he didn't listen.. Guess that is a decent way to go if there is any.... Cheers; Ramsay 1

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    "I asked my doctor if it was OK to have sex, he said not if you join in,"

    Rodney Dangerfield

    When I worked with brake linings, we had the riveter, and the machine that ground the shoes in an arc. It made alot of dust, I did try to avoid breathing it, because it was unpleasant to say the least, but the worst was trying to sweep up the place.

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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    "I asked my doctor if it was OK to have sex, he said not if you join in,"

    Rodney Dangerfield

    When I worked with brake linings, we had the riveter, and the machine that ground the shoes in an arc. It made alot of dust, I did try to avoid breathing it, because it was unpleasant to say the least, but the worst was trying to sweep up the place.
    I knew a guy who worked for Precision Brake and Clutch in Baton Rouge, Louisiana who worked in that dust for years and died at a ripe old age.. I have seen those machines true brake shoes and theirs was by an open window so that most of the dust would go outside... Use to bring our brake bands and frictions from our cranes there to get them relined.. Then they figured out we could do them in house so yours truly was elected to the job.....I asked the doctor a few days ago how many asbestos clutches he heard rattling around in my lungs when he listened to them.. Cheers from a grouchy old man in Louisiana.. Ramsay 1

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    In some respects it’s a bit like smoking, some people smoke 20 a day and live to a ripe old age and some don’t.

    When I was an apprentice I knew the guy who was the full time analyst at TBA. He wheeled a huge machine like a juke box around the factory analysing the air at breathing level. On Monday morning he’d start at one end of the factory and work his way to the other end by Friday afternoon. Start again the following week. Like painting the Forth Bridge.

    He told me where the worst places were regarding air quality. One of the worst was the department were they wove brake lining material on really old looms. They were old looms because new looms couldn’t take the wear and tear.I worked in there for about 6 months before I left the company, changing broken crankshafts etc.

    I knew an old guy pretty well who’d worked in there all his life. He lived to a ripe old age, well into his late 80’s, before he had a fatal heart attack.

    The friend I referred to in an earlier post had been a teacher and as far as he knew he’d never come into contact with asbestos. Given it was asbestosis that killed him must have done at some point in his life.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Given it was asbestosis that killed him must have done at some point in his life.

    Regards Tyrone.
    Asbestosis is a disease where the lungs are restricted by heavy exposure to clouds of asbestos dust. Think of it as similar to black lung from coal mining. Mesothelioma is a cancer of the plural lining of the lungs; and it can be caused by even small exposures to asbestos dust.

    So your comment about your friend is interesting. If he died from asbestosis he must have had some sustained exposure to asbestos, not just a little bit.


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