1943 Rockford Planer "The Beast" - Page 32
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  1. #621
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    Quote Originally Posted by chevy43 View Post

    On mine the table broad nose marks are at least 1/2 inch wide indicating to me that it was finished on a much bigger planer and not by itself.

    T.
    I've been thinking about the width of the marks on my table. While the travel of my arm is only about .200" per stroke I could easily duplicate the marks on my machine's table just by stopping the table and moving the head manually for each cut.

    For the manufacture to plane the table on another machine just seems like a unneeded step and you would get the best accuracy by planing the table on the machine it was made for..

    But, then again, what the heck do I know

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  3. #622
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    How is a vice of this size and construction suppose to operate?
    Big part bolts (and maybe pins) to round part - after you get the three pieces assembled

    Bolting square part down to table pinches the round part hard - no rotate

    Loosening table bolts frees up rotation as needed

    Next time, we can talk about how work pieces are clamped if that is unclear

    Counterbores are very likely per '36 standard - '60 standard socketheads are a no-go
    Last edited by johnoder; 02-03-2017 at 08:20 AM.

  4. #623
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    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    I've been thinking about the width of the marks on my table. While the travel of my arm is only about .200" per stroke I could easily duplicate the marks on my machine's table just by stopping the table and moving the head manually for each cut.

    For the manufacture to plane the table on another machine just seems like a unneeded step and you would get the best accuracy by planing the table on the machine it was made for..

    But, then again, what the heck do I know
    Unless maybe they were doing several at once and drilling the holes and flipping them over to do the dove tails?

    Would you do me a favor and check and see if each way is on the same plane on your machine?

    T.

  5. #624
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    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    I've been thinking about the width of the marks on my table. While the travel of my arm is only about .200" per stroke I could easily duplicate the marks on my machine's table just by stopping the table and moving the head manually for each cut.

    For the manufacture to plane the table on another machine just seems like a unneeded step and you would get the best accuracy by planing the table on the machine it was made for..

    But, then again, what the heck do I know
    Wouldn't they have to bolt the machine down to cut with it? I remember hearing the concrete foundation supplanted a lot of iron that would otherwise be needed to provide enough rigidity to cut accurately.

  6. #625
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    Quote Originally Posted by [486] View Post
    Wouldn't they have to bolt the machine down to cut with it? I remember hearing the concrete foundation supplanted a lot of iron that would otherwise be needed to provide enough rigidity to cut accurately.
    If I were making something like this I would have bolts installed on the factory floor for hold downs as I tested it anyway.. Simple matter to remove the nuts, lift the machine off and then set the next machine's base into place..

    Just a Big Ass Fixture

  7. #626
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    Finished moving the pony motor this afternoon... Really nice to have that motor outside as I can only hear a hum now

    I thought of using a motor box like those used for aerobic sewer systems but they are not sized for a 20 HP motor... Ended up buying a medium size dog house from Tractor Supply. Leveled out the area behind the shop and set 6 solid blocks for the foundation..

    20170202_160137.jpg

    Next we drilled 4 drain holes in the bottom of the house and placed two 8x8's inside the bottom. The bottom part of the house has a slightly raised floor with a recess all around the perimeter of the floor. Drilled 4 holes in this area to drain any moisture that would collect there.

    20170202_171818.jpg

    The 8x8's raise up the motor and make a pretty good base to screw the motor to.

    20170202_172640.jpg

    Ran the conduit into the back of the box and we will secure it to the wall in a drip loop. Nice thing about this house is the two piece construction. The top will remove for service and made it really easy to install the motor.

    20170202_172817.jpg

    Almost finished.. Just need to make a permanent door.

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  9. #627
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    That'll keep the burglars away when they hear that dog growling all the time

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    Probably should check the motor temperature after running for a few hours with the planer running too. Air flow/cooling might be an issue.

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  13. #629
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    Back to grouting in the anchor bolts, sometimes (more often than not) the holes are hard to get to when you want to fill them up. I have a small hand pump but before I got that we would make a long funnel out of plastic sheet and pour it in. I also would take a coat hanger, straighten it out with a little loop on the end, and using a drill "vibrate" the grout so it would settle properly. My concrete vibrator is way to big to fit in these situations.

  14. #630
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grigg View Post
    Probably should check the motor temperature after running for a few hours with the planer running too. Air flow/cooling might be an issue.
    The top of the house has covered vent holes and I was thinking of putting a louvered vent in the front door. The thing I'm mostly worried about is high humidity...

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  16. #631
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    Mount a fan on the motor shaft.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbdjr59 View Post
    Mount a fan on the motor shaft.
    That's an idea I'll file away

    When summer hits I'll see how hot it gets... It's only been about 78 degrees the last few days, not hot enough, yet....

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    The motor has an internal fan which should do the job just fine so long as enough air can get in and out of the enclosure/dog house.

  19. #634
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    I really think the motor will be fine.... Except maybe for the "Dog Days" of summer

  20. #635
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbdjr59 View Post
    Back to grouting in the anchor bolts, sometimes (more often than not) the holes are hard to get to when you want to fill them up. I have a small hand pump but before I got that we would make a long funnel out of plastic sheet and pour it in. I also would take a coat hanger, straighten it out with a little loop on the end, and using a drill "vibrate" the grout so it would settle properly. My concrete vibrator is way to big to fit in these situations.
    Touch the top of the holding down bolt with the vibratory poker. Some of the vibrations will travel down the bolt into the concrete. Just be sure the vibrations don't release the nut on the holding down bolt.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Slip a cap over the stud, or a bit of closed off pipe to keep the grout out of the upper threads you'll need to use. Gets tricky cleaning them out afterwards 'round the back' amhik !

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    Just want to thank swatkins and everyone else who has contributed. It’s made for some great reading the past couple weeks. Sounds like it’s going to be a great workhorse for you. I will be using many of the ideas presented as I clean up my Smith & Mills shaper. I look forward to reading future adventures and news from your scraping class.
    Hope I’m not too far off topic, but I wanted to ask your planer group a question about tool bits. In our shop, we had HSS inserts for our planer and shaper (25 plus year ago). From what I remember the insert was about 1” wide and 1.5” long. There were serrations on the back end of the insert that the tool holder clamped down on. When sharpening was needed, you loosened the clamp, took out the insert, transferred it to the hand holder. This allowed you to sharpen it on a pedestal grinder very easily because of it’s 12” long handle. You had lot’s of control, the insert clamped to this hand holder using the same method the actual insert tool holder used on the machine. Thought that might ring a bell with Tyrone or someone else. My google search did find Arthur R Warner Co. inserts, but indexable tools like theirs is not what I’m referring to. Thanks,
    Werner

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    Hi wschwarz, your post rings a bell. I remember seeing a similar planing tool. The insert was circular, say maybe 1-1/8" to 1-1/4" in dia. When the surface you were using became dull you released the locking screw and rotated the insert to expose a new edge of the insert. They seemed work ok, as I recall the ones I saw were used on steel components. This has got to be 30 years ago so my memory is a bit vague.

    Regards Tyrone.

  25. #639
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    Been very busy working and getting ready for the scraping class so not much time to work on the old girl..

    I have finished leveling the base and geting the ways level and coplanar. By using the leveling bolts it was simple to adjust the base to very good alignment. Tomorrow I'll tighten the gibs on the cross arm, lock the arm to the column and see how far off the arm is.

    Ken was kind enough to send along some tooling for the machine.. He ran out of time on two of the tools but sent drawings so I could finish them up.

    20170212_172931.jpg20170212_172948.jpg20170212_172936.jpg20170202_174111.jpg

    Now for a question. I included pictures of two of the more interesting tools and although I've seen pictures of these there are not a lot of hints on their use. When would you use these tools? I would think they were for fine finish cuts as a heavy cut would really make the tools spring back...

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  27. #640
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    Broad nose gooseneck planer tools. Extremely light cuts for a super fine finish. Ideally, a gooseneck tool is built to where the tool itself hangs well below the bottom of the tool shank. The ideal design has the edge of the tool sitting exactly on the center of the clapperbox hinge axis to prevent digging in and chatter. Same for a planer or shaper.

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