1943 Rockford Planer "The Beast" - Page 42
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  1. #821
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    I'm not sure if they're stout enough for planer use, but Northwestern Tools has some "Hi-Rise Clamps" with stackable 1" diameter solid and slotted clamp supports, wide support base, with clamps that mesh with the slotted bar. These are used with ordinary long or coupled studs.

    I actually have a set (which I haven't used in ages as I haven't put anything tall on the big mill) but cannot recall if you can use standard plain clamps with the stackable supports.

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    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    Always surprises me on the difference in size between a 123 and a 246 block
    Good to know that's not just me.

  3. #823
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    I unpacked the box this morning...There are so many pieces that I could probably hold down a space shuttle, IF I could get it through the shop door


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  5. #824
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    Why not investigate the sliders on the Kennedy tool box and repair / replace / re-engineer them ?

    Roller drawer slides are available separately if needs must.

  6. #825
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrewmawson View Post
    Why not investigate the sliders on the Kennedy tool box and repair / replace / re-engineer them ?

    Roller drawer slides are available separately if needs must.
    I looked at that earlier and about the only way to improve the drawers functions, to the level I like, with a lot of weight in each door is to replace all the slides with roller bearing slides. A lot of money and I'm still left with a beat up box.

    I have another stack of Kennedy Boxes, in my other machine room, that I have had for 30 years and purchased brand new. At that time if you had any other brand of box, well, snickers could be heard as you walked by..... Today I really think that the KOBALT boxes are just as good and better than some models of the Kennedy. That's why the last 6 box purchases have been from Lowe's.

    Now people can snicker all they want.

    On a sad note.... All the Loews stores have stopped selling this tool box and have drank the Craftsman Kool-Aid Their tool section is now a sea of red with crappy craftsman tools and now, tool boxes. I don't know who is behind the push but all of the Ace Hardware stores are also converted......

    The salesmen are all happy and gushing about the "quality" and "history" of Craftsman... I just shake my head and think of how far the Craftsman name has fallen...

    One sales person would just not stop his gushing praise of Craftsman... I simply picked up a open end wrench and showed him the nice, polished handle that look great but was almost like a knife edge when used to free a nut or bolt. They are made that way now to save material and shipping costs. The fact that you now have to wrap a rag around the handle or wear gloves to really use the wrench went right over the salesman's head

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  8. #826
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    It is probably forbidden to mention but my brother-in-law convinced me to check out the 44" x 22" HF tool box he purchased and I was very surprised by the quality. To the extant that when I saw them on sale for $400 I went and got one, and now my kennedy top and bottom boxes are being repurposed.

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    This will be utterly unhelpful for several reasons, not least of which is that they were discontinued years ago, but the TRAXX series roller cabinets and machinists' chests from Waterloo were absolutely fabulous value for the money, especially when purchased from Enco, also gone (absorbed into MSC). They were slightly better built than the comparable ball-bearing slide Kennedys, at about 1/3 the price, and they had the drawer heights I wanted.

    Nothing in Waterloo's current catalog is remotely close to the late, lamented TRAXX. I bought one of their later "shop roller cabinets" and consider it a disposable.
    Last edited by sfriedberg; 04-17-2019 at 08:50 PM.

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    I've just finished refurbishing a pair of Pindar Versatool cabinets - they are becoming rare as the 'trendy's ' are using them as kitchen cupboards. Bridgeport supplied them at one time with Interacts.

    Basically a clean up, install casters, and give the a new paint job.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails labels-fixed.jpg   cabinet-1-open.jpg  

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  12. #829
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    All of our tool boxes are old non bearing slides types (Craftsman, Waterloo, Kennedy, Lyon). But you know me, an old 'Murican made "economy" tool is x10 better than a cutting-edge import! I'm cheap and stubborn.

    For us it's not an issue as all the stuff that stays out on the shop floor is light and small and the weighty items (like fixturing and work-holding pieces) have their own wood boxes or trays that are kept in shelves in the tool crib. So heavy-duty shelves took care of that. we built tall and narrow shelves out of 2" tubular square steel with heavy Gage sheet metal decking. The intent was to have something we could stack vises on floor to ceiling without any sag.

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  14. #830
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    Had to repair a handle on the Beast... It was broken when it arrived here and someone had brazed it. I cleaned off all the braze and used a tig cast iron rod to make a pretty good repair.


    I loved the ease of use with this rod. No peening, preheat or post heat required. I really heated this part up and took no other precautions to keep it from cracking...

    Anyway I made a video of the repairs and would love it if you took a look

    YouTube



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    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    I loved the ease of use with this rod. No peening, preheat or post heat required. I really heated this part up and took no other precautions to keep it from cracking...

    YouTube
    What rod did you use?

  16. #832
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    EZ Weld Cast Iron Tig Wire Home - EZ Weld TIG Wire

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  18. #833
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    Hi Steve this is a fantastic thread of persistence and skill. Incredible machine and documenting the journey to make it all work again is highly appreciated!

    I have a question for you (or other hands, related to planer work)...supposing you are trying to align a piece of work with a dial indicator...

    Does the machine have a creep speed so you can go very slowly to understand how the work is misaligned (or coming into alignment, you know )? Or is there another technique? Do you just bump it back and forth?

    I have this old smaller Putnam gear & belt drive and I would like to work out a VFD conversion for it....in my case I was going to have a single digit Hz (motor speed) to be able to creep back and forth for alignment...but I wondered how you accomplished it on the hydraulic drive machine?


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  20. #834
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    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    EZ Weld Cast Iron Tig Wire Home - EZ Weld TIG Wire
    Can you cut the finished weld with a file, or is it so hard that it needs to be ground?

  21. #835
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    Can you cut the finished weld with a file, or is it so hard that it needs to be ground?
    At the end of the video, I linked to above, you can see me working with the files on the handle. It is pretty much like working with regular cast iron.

    On edges I plane there is usually a harder outer surface, from the stress relieving I guess. After you get through that layer the Iron is "softer" and cuts like butter with a sharp blade. I was say the weld rod material is in between the two in hardness.

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  23. #836
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt_isserstedt View Post
    Hi Steve this is a fantastic thread of persistence and skill. Incredible machine and documenting the journey to make it all work again is highly appreciated!

    I have a question for you (or other hands, related to planer work)...supposing you are trying to align a piece of work with a dial indicator...

    Does the machine have a creep speed so you can go very slowly to understand how the work is misaligned (or coming into alignment, you know )? Or is there another technique? Do you just bump it back and forth?

    I have this old smaller Putnam gear & belt drive and I would like to work out a VFD conversion for it....in my case I was going to have a single digit Hz (motor speed) to be able to creep back and forth for alignment...but I wondered how you accomplished it on the hydraulic drive machine?

    I have found that the table on my machine is well aligned with the cutting tool holder and I use the table to measure off the alignment. For ultra presession you can use a dial and "creep" the table forward (sadly only forward)by using the motion handle and just allowing a little fluid past the valve.

    I am working out there today and I'll take a short video of the different tools I have found very useful..

  24. #837
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    Quote Originally Posted by matt_isserstedt View Post
    Hi Steve this is a fantastic thread of persistence and skill. Incredible machine and documenting the journey to make it all work again is highly appreciated!

    I have a question for you (or other hands, related to planer work)...supposing you are trying to align a piece of work with a dial indicator...

    Does the machine have a creep speed so you can go very slowly to understand how the work is misaligned (or coming into alignment, you know )? Or is there another technique? Do you just bump it back and forth?

    I have this old smaller Putnam gear & belt drive and I would like to work out a VFD conversion for it....in my case I was going to have a single digit Hz (motor speed) to be able to creep back and forth for alignment...but I wondered how you accomplished it on the hydraulic drive machine?
    ]
    Another thought for you.... When you are finished setting up the machine you should mount an indicator and measure the inside of one of the table slots... I took a skim cut off of one of mine to make it truly aligned with the ways. Just a small cut on the side of the T slot game me a dead on reference line.

    Most times I do not set up things straight with the table while make a top surface cut.. In this new video you can see the machine taking a small slant cut across the material... I find that lets the bit ease into the work instead of taking the full width of the cut all at once... Especially helpful when the work is light held!


  25. #838
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    Thanks for your reply and the video. That makes sense. I want to build some press brake tooling when the machine is operational, so I figured there would be a bit of indicating to get the various setups nailed down properly and the tooling is going to have to be flipped over. Like anything have to learn my way thru it.

    Do you have any idea what SFM you are typcically cutting at? Seems slow like in the 50-100sfm as just a wild guess...and don't take that as a criticism because I can appreciate the benefits No need to wear out the edge tooling making big smoky chips! The material I think I want to use after some trials is a prehardened 4140/42 steel so while I think HSS toolbits can be used it needs to go slower as to not burn off the edge.

    You have a lot of great project machines going in there....great time to have a shop when there are hardly any places to safely go

  26. #839
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    I timed it once a long time ago... So long ago I forgot what it was

    For what I am mostly doing this is the best, speed for me. This is one powerful machine and it's like using a sherman tank to mow the lawn... Instead of speed I use depth and width of cut to determine rate of metal removal.

    You want chips? I'll give you CHIPS!



    That is moving at the same speed I always use..

    This machine is big and heavy.. The base and table alone weigh, well lets just say the truck and trailer might have been exceeding the weight limit just a tad.. Not saying they were, just maybe Heck the column alone, with everything on it, weighs about 8400 pounds..

    It is bolted down to the floor with 20, 3/4 or 1 inch bolts. If I turn the speed up I can walk that machine right out of the shop with just the table weight alone! Bolts? What Bolts? Try stopping that much table weight and reversing it on a dime.

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  28. #840
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    I have a Rockford openside planer, a rare thing in the UK
    I was surprised how light it was compared to the equivalent sized butler or stirk


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