3/4 " Scale Hudson Locomotive built by Victor Shattock. - Page 3
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 71
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    scotland united kingdom
    Posts
    1,063
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2674
    Likes (Received)
    710

    Default

    Lester & Joe,
    The input to this thread you have both added is invaluable, Lester speaks of his childhood and reading Popular Mechanics, We in the llate 1940 era, in to about the 1960/s could get that particular magazine over here, and I remember buying the occasional issue at the local railway booksellers, occasionally at jumble sales the odd copy still turns up, Which makes me think that granny's loft still has the odd goodie lurking.
    Talking of model making gets me thinking on my younger days, Being fascinated by one of my maternal uncles who was in the mining trade , and also by the haulage gear up at a local mine which I was taken in to see , This was a single drum haulage which hauled the hutches (Tubs to you folks ) up a declivity of 30% to the surface , I was about five years of age, and nothing would stop me from rigging up a haulage gear, this consisted of a lump of modelling clay a four inch nail, pushed through one of my mothers empty thread bobbins (Which at the direction of my old uncle had a small nail driven into the side so "A one power child " could turn it) + a small length of wood to represent the haulage road, What did I haul up with my primitive haulage gear and my length of fine twine wrapped around the bobbin? a small box with more modelling clay to give a load so it could slide back down the track. I had lots of fun with my Cutting oil mac little coalmine, Especially as the house cat used to derail my set up, That to me in my tiny mind was war damage, Remember it was still war time 1945
    Later on at school I was lucky enough to have an old headmaster who was pretty cllued in as to visual aids for teaching He was a prolific ship model maker and would briing in his models of early sailing galeons , which he would let us see half finished so we could see the construction & when these masterpieces were completed we would base our history lessons around what we had seen.
    A year later when I found myself in another school We had a schoolmaster who somehow or other had obtained from the education dept some cut out cardboard models of coastal steam ships, which we were all tasked to turn out, Well I based my model on one of Kelly & Companies coal carrying ships, which sailed every week from Ayr harbour to Belfast, These powerful ships were beautifully kept, Because they were coal carriers did not mean they were kept like pigsties
    When it came to painting my model i was fairly meticulous, (for my age thankfully) I painted the hull a nice black, a little red plimsol line with a wax crayon, and the funnels just like the big fellows Red,White, and Blue rings Being a Belfast firm, I now wonder if this colouration was a statement?

    What did I learn from the little ships, Pay attention to what is round about you, a lot of the class painted their ships pink ! Pink ? you should have heard the headmaster He walloped absolute hell out of them for gross stupidity with a leather belt, I guess I learned a very valuable lesson in life early on , If you are doing anything for heavens sake use common sense
    however back to normality, and proper engineering, When I was a youngster in the Glasgow art Gallery and Museum at Kelvingrove , was a very crude model of a portable engine capable of operating,under steam , After a number of years it vanished until early on last year I asked a young lady curator of its whereabouts fearing it had been turfed out by a certain person. I knew it had been constructed by an Indian lad of about fifteen years of age , I thought up in the foothills of the Himalaya's, I set the poor girl a terrible task, One of the things I remember about the model it had incorporated in its build two brass cartridge cases, Had he been found carrying them home he would have been stood up against a wall and shot, ( On a good day) It is worth noting this model was constructed approx 1890 and by a youngfster who had never seen what happens inside an engine steam chest , He had to think it out himself , his boiler he rivetted up from a galvanised heavy guage plate He cast his own cylinders , and "machined" his components on a home made lathe I believe Where is all this leadng to? Well it would seem the great Glasgow Locomotive Builder Henry Dubbs was in Burma on buisiness (Note-- It would seem after I had a word with the young lady curator The model had been built in Burma, by a mill labourer boy,) Henry Dubs brought the kid over to Scotland with his model engine which was displayed alongside one of The North British Locomotive Companies fine express engines at the great 1900 engineering exhibition, It would seem the youngster was subsequently an apprentice in that massive works
    Not bad considering that one of the last museum curators contemptuously referred to "Indian Boy and his rough engine" nobody had thought on looking behind the engine for its social and technical merit, Well done the young lady both she and I have made him immortal!

    Fast forward to Joe referring to the Mr know it all who turned up at Hanford Mill, and the subsequent irritation he caused, I had somewhat of a not dis-similar experience some months back Again it was a talk and visit to see various artifacts in the museums reserve collection presented by the young lady curator, Amongst the artifacts on display was the young Burmese lads engine, and for a joker in the pack, At my behest, A really superb electrically driven beer pump for forcing beer from the kegs up to the beer taps in the public bar up the stairs, It must have been a big Glasgow pub slaking the thirst of numerous tired and thirsty Glasgow workers about six o'clock most nights,
    Well this little machine was constructed by a very fine little firm up in the Calton district of the east end of the city Which, lasted until approx 1965, They were called Alan & Bogle Calton Brass foundry, a very long established firm of great merit renowned for fine marine brass work, and hotel and pub fixtures.

    Well I was landed with the unenviable task of explaining how this machine operated, It was constructed in 1916 The approx mid point of the great war, The first recipients of my master class was two real experts, the first statement from one of these geniuses was "I do not think that machine was ever built for any other purpose than to display in the museum" Really said I Alan & Bogle were constructing machinery purely for show in the midst of war production, for its day it had a really lovely little United States of America Century motor with a little fabriol or leather gear wheel gearing on to a larger wheel situated between two bearings with really nicely turned disc cranks to little con rods to each ones pump ram , We are still in the easy part of the question and answer sessions, next pearl of wisdom from one of the audience "Ido not think it has ever worked " Really off came the grase cup lid, "Whats that Slightly dirty grease" Next " It is too well made to work in a pub cellar" It is made for the food and drink trade stupid! I thought it could not get any worse till I showed them by lifting up the link arm from the diaphragm to the pressure control motor on & off switch, I may say gently with my little finger ," you will break that mechanism" Answer No I wont!, Next There was no way The beer could be pumped up from the barrell by the pump rams , and go up to the rising main, " It must go back out that suction pipe to the clients up the stair"
    By this time, I had given up the will to live & was contemplating slashing my wrists, I wonder how long it takes some of todays citizens to learn to lift the toilet seat before having a pee? you wonder is it lack of ability to learn or just being smart.
    Well things got better I was next tasked with explaining the modus -operandi of this fine little machine to a young lady of German nationality She picked up the salient points of the machine in five miutes, I rest my case.
    should you folks ever get a chance to read or see a copy of Mechanics In Miniature by Percival Marshall, It was first printed in 1947 & subsequently reprinted in 1948, Old Percival was the founder of The model Engineer Magazine, & brought all that models of items of the mechanical arts mean and the book is really beautifully illustrated much of it in sepia and anice light green tone, It is a very fine and delightful book.
    Joe I will be back later to give another blast on boilers -- Excuse the pun! It is getting late

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    24
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    25

    Default

    My name is Keith Taylor and I was the last East Coast Secretary of the Brotherhood of Live Steamers.
    I am wondering how you know for sure that the locomotive was built by Victor Shattock.? The reason I say that is I can tell you with absolute certainty that the locomotive you have was designed by Martin Lewis in the 1930’s and serialzed as a construction series in The Model Craftsman Magazine. The articles included instructions and drawings to make your own patterns to be cast at a local foundry prior to Mr. Lewis selling castings as “Little Engines.” In fact I have a set of patterns made from those drawings that match exactly what you have. I also wonder about Mr. Shattock’s connection as he built several models that were exact scale models. I have never seeen any evidence of him building to the designs of any other designer and I think it unlikely that he would build a “freelance” model to Martin Lewis’s drawings.
    There were other 3/4” scale Hudson kits available in the past. The most accurate of them was designed by L.D. Langworthy of Westerly, Rhode Island. Other scale models of the New York Central Hudson were available from Calvert Holt in Connecticut and Frank Birch in Ontario, Canada.
    hudson-006.jpg
    The attached photo shows a NYC Hudson in my collection. It was built by the late Harry Hansen of Lyndhurst, NJ to the Langworthy design

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Modesto california USA
    Posts
    640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    991
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    I see a number of differences between your pic and my Locomotive on quick glance. The Trailing Bogie is quite different as well as the Hangers for the valve gear. Most of my locomotive is built up using plate and fabrication methods whereas your pic show more castings used than mine.

    If you read from the beginning of this thread you will find a provenance tracing its history back to Shattock..at least according to Ken Shattock who confirmed he knew of this locomotive. I appreciate your reply and post. However I am not going to repeat what I have written. Whoever built it did a fabulous job. I believe Kens story and maybe or maybe not what he remembered may be "off" a bit.

    Keep in mind Shattock built MANY locomotives and later on went a gauge higher and built some English models as well. I don't believe I've ever said it was a SCALE model. As Jim Christie mentioned Southern Pacific Locomotive Roster show no Hudson's in their repertoire. I found this out too and wondered about it until I realized that Shattock's Locomotives were not necessarily only SP locomotives. It is way too late to really say for sure. Ken said it was one of his. I have to go with the last living person who knew Victor Shattock locomotives intimately.

    I would love to do a side by side comparison with one of Vic's other Loco's to compare workmanship and method's. I think this might confirm him as builder.

    I haven't had time to post anymore pics but I deeply appreciate the comments thus far. In fact I am so overwhelmed by the amount of technical information it has left me feeling quite ignorant of most things. Thus I have thoroughly enjoyed Joe and Jim..Mac and others who have contributed greatly to this thread.

    I have posted what I know and have been told. You didn't say..do the patterns you possess match YOUR Hudson or mine? It is VERY possible Shattock built from someone else's design. But your Hudson depiction differs from mine if indeed you were trying to show their similarities. Thanks for posting. Just the fact this chassis exists is incredible unto itself.

  4. Likes cutting oil Mac liked this post
  5. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    24
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    25

    Default

    If you re-read my post I mention that my locomotive was built to the Langworthy design and I said that yours was the Martin Lewis freelance design. That was to point out the difference between a scale model of a NYC Hudson and the freelance Martin Lewis design. I am not saying that one is better than the other...on;ly that they are different and the locomotive you have is not typical of the locomotives that Vic Shattock built. Sadly we cannot get Ken involved in the discussion as he has passed away. One other point I can mention is your locomotive having a steel boiler. Every Shattock locomotive I am aware of had a copper boiler. You have a very nice model and I am sure when finished you will have a lot of enjoyment from it. Even if the locomotive had been built by someone other than Mr. Shattock, it can still be a fine model. It’s quality doesn’t depend on whether or not it was built by Mr. Shattock.
    Proving a provenance without written evidence is not easy to do.
    You can read a lot about Mr. Shattock at this page: Victor Shattock - IBLS
    There are quite a few work.

  6. Likes Lester Bowman liked this post
  7. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Modesto california USA
    Posts
    640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    991
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    Thank you. Yes. I understood your post. I agree on all you've said Well put. There are no absolutes only an oral history given over the phone by Ken Shattock. Nice Hudson you have there. I like mine better

  8. #46
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Modesto california USA
    Posts
    640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    991
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    Also I am NOT trying to prove anything to anyone. I have shared this information because there are friends on this Forum who enjoy these things. After all..look at the marvelous stories that have been shared and experiences recounted. Lots of hands on practical knowledge in this thread. Thanks to all.

  9. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    L'Orignal, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1219
    Likes (Received)
    696

    Default

    Lester ,
    I had been going to try and post something more but kept finding more related links on line and it will still take a bit of work to condense it .
    I found a copy of The Model Craftsman magazine mentioned by Keith Taylor , from May of 1936 that i think I picked up in recent years at a Montreal area hobby shop .
    There was a list of topics from previous issues shown in there but I can’t see thing listed for the Martin Lewis Hudson listed in the years shown there.
    With Keith Taylors identification I think it might be very helpful for someone contemplating competing your engine if you could get access to those magazines or who knows someone my even have a set of drawings for it stashed away some where.
    I don’t see them listed on archive.org or the Hathi Trust Library sites but maybe some one else will know how to turn them up on line somewhere.
    They are listed in this site so perhaps you might find a set with the issues about your engine in a library local to you .
    The Model craftsman. (Journal, magazine, 1933) [WorldCat.org]

    My scanner is not very kind to old magazines so I tried to take some pictures from my copy with my camera but they didn’t come out too well .
    As a young teenager I was introduced to the world of Live Steam model Locomotives by the late F.A.( Frank ) McLean who some may remember wrote articles in Live Steam and The Home Shop Machinist from the mid 1970 s until he died in 1996.
    Frank was the local high school machine shop teacher and friend of my father’s who had grown up in Montreal .
    When my father was starting his business about 1971 I used to go with my father and Frank to Montreal to visit the various machinery dealers.
    Joe Michaels had written in a number of threads about the old time machinery dealers he knew in New York .
    He could just as easily have been talking about their counterparts in Montreal as I remember them .
    On one of our trips Frank took us to visit Mr . Jim Turnbull who I remember him telling us he was 84 at the time and he took us down to his basement work shop .
    I was hooked when I saw the 10 wheeler he was working on , one of 3 or more of that model that he made that I know of .
    He showed us the callipers he used to measure the driving wheels and the cylinders he bored on his South Bend Lathe
    I tried a couple of searches and found this picture from a few years before my visit .
    I think the locomotive in the linked picture was an earlier one that the one being built when I was there.
    Jim Turnbull - IBLS.
    You can’t see the small South Bend lathe off to the right of the locomotive or the U.S. Burke # 3 or 4 milling machine to the left of the photographer.
    You can see much more about him and the Montreal Live Steamers in this link and their connections with the various clubs in the north eastern U.S.A.
    Montreal Live Steamers - IBLS
    I seem to remember Jim Turnbull telling us at some point that he had been to one of the Live Steam Clubs in California so I would not be at all surprised if he had known Mr. Shattock or at least know of him since he was also involved in the hobby back in the 1930 s
    I have attached a picture from a page of The Shop Wisdom of Frank McLean and some from the Model Craftsman .
    I’ll try and post some more another time .
    Regards,
    Jim
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscf8435.jpg   dscf8437.jpg   dscf8433.jpg   dscf8435.jpg   dscf8437.jpg  


  10. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Modesto california USA
    Posts
    640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    991
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    Keith..would you post pictures of these patterns for the Martin Lewis Locomotive ? I would appreciate this very much. I'm not doubting you at all and more than likely you are probably correct. The more I read about these early "Shakers and Movers" the more I realize how closely knit they were. I didn't realize they were building live steam locomotives in the 1930's in the USA from Modeling Magazine's. Learn something new every day. Thanks!

  11. #49
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Modesto california USA
    Posts
    640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    991
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    Thanks Jim. I appreciate your leg work Here. As I mentioned in my post to Keith..I didn't realize the USA had Modeling Magazine's covering Live Steam Locomotive building in those earlier days. Your pics are very interesting.

    I'm glad Keith posted his information. The story is becoming very convoluted. I'll carry on after some more thought.

  12. Likes Jim Christie liked this post
  13. #50
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    24
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lester Bowman View Post
    Thank you. Yes. I understood your post. I agree on all you've said Well put. There are no absolutes only an oral history given over the phone by Ken Shattock. Nice Hudson you have there. I like mine better
    As well you should! You have fine model that will give you many years of fun.
    Keith

  14. Likes Lester Bowman liked this post
  15. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    28,380
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    And the "bible" from those days - before area codes and zip codes
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails little-engines.jpg  

  16. Likes Jim Christie, Lester Bowman liked this post
  17. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    24
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    25

    Default

    Here are two photos of the patterns I have for the Martin Lewis 4-6-4. I have more patterns and the core boxes than are shown in these photos.

    I have a PDF file of the elevation drawing in the Nov. 1934 issue of the Model Craftsman Magazine, but the file is too big to post here. If anyone is interested send me a private message with your e-mail address and I will send it along.

    Keith
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 14864da5-41fe-4c2d-a21a-2d4d85e0af38.jpg   96ef7088-c133-478f-a13e-759d0b8bde04.jpg  

  18. Likes Lester Bowman liked this post
  19. #53
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Maine, USA
    Posts
    24
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    And the "bible" from those days - before area codes and zip codes
    That book is a re-print of the Model Craftsman articles and it contains all of the drawings and instructions to build the locomotive that was designed by Martin Lewis.

    Keith

  20. Likes Jim Christie, Lester Bowman liked this post
  21. #54
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    ny usa
    Posts
    384
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    243

    Default

    This is an awesome thread!!!!!

    I love reading posts from knowledgeable people that just want to pass it forward!

    Thank you, all of you, that don't feel the need to spit out senile rants and talk about obsolete gensets and other garbage, to feel needed. You fuckers are what make this site amazing.

    It's amazing the collective knowledge that is contained here.

    If this comes to N.Y., I will put my hands on it.

  22. Likes Lester Bowman liked this post
  23. #55
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Shandaken, NY, USA
    Posts
    4,033
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    949
    Likes (Received)
    6176

    Default

    Woodsrider845:

    I see you are from NY, and by the "845" attached to your "handle", I wonder if you are in the Hudson Valley. 845 is the area code for the Hudson Valley region of NYS. As for obsolete gensets and "other garbage", all of it goes along with working on old machine tools and old engines. Somewhere along the line, the guys with the obsolete gensets of ancient welding generators are finding some application for them, perhaps needing to satisfy curiousity about something that was "in the family", or something they were tripping over 'cause it seemed too good to haul off for scrap, or needing it to power up his 3 phase machine tools, or just want the satisfaction of getting it put to rights. We try to treat everyone who participates here with respect, and unless they are off the wall with what they are posting about, arrogrant, political, or otherwise obnoxious or insulting, we are quite tolerant and accepting.

    Setting that aside, some of us are "old farts", and tend to ramble a bit in our posts, and sometimes readers have to bear with us and sort the wheat from the chaff.
    However, as I said, we do treat each other with respect and try not to get too out of line in our choice of words. As is oft said, there is a time and place for everything, and what I might say on a jobsite amongst the crafts, or even at myself for missing some detail, is not necessarily what I would use to express myself amongst the folks, whom I refer to as my "brethren" on this 'board. Not to sound like a Sunday School Teacher or "Miss Manners", but we do have a degree of civility and respect here. You are welcome here, but as one of the people contributing to this thread in particular, and this 'board in general, I know you did not mean "f--kers" in a derrogatory or insulting sense, but, it just is a little out of line for how we conduct ourselves here. Think of it this way: If you walked into a biker bar (and I've ridden heavy motorcycles a LOT for close to 50 years- old British Iron, Harleys and Airhead BMW's), you would find a bunch of what I call "insta bikers"- the types who buy a Hog or crotch rocket, get the leathers and patches sewn on them, stickers on the black skull-cap minimal helmet (or Wehrmacht style helmet), types "trying to be bad". Every other word is "f- this" or MF'n. All the interjections of the "F" or "MF" words does nothing for what they are trying to say, and is only a "space filler". All their efforts to seem tough or "bad" are hardly believable. About the only atmosphere in those kinds of bars is loud, crude, and nothing worth remembering or repeating. On the other hand, if you walked into an old neighborhood bar or tavern where men off jobsites and out of the shops went to have a cold one or two, the conversation and environment are welcoming, no one trying to be "bad" or coming on strong. People are civil, if not polite. I suppose the gold standard in this analogy is a true Pub in the UK, where men who do a hard day's work gather. I've been in those kinds of pubs, and again,the atmosphere is welcoming and civil with no one coming on "strong" or trying to be "bad".

    In short, I am one of those "f--rs" you refer to. I consider myself in excellent company, and I enjoy the civility and respectful atmosphere on this 'board. I am an old dinosaur, stubborn and proud, and one of the things I expect and use as a judge of a person- especially younger people "coming up" in the engineering profession or machinist's trade- is "how they carry themselves". If they do not take off their glove to shake my hand or have a weak handshake, it is a red flag to me. Poor speech or the free use of what I call "cuss words" is another red flag. How a young person stands and how they present themselves when I meet them on a job may as well be a part of an interview. I've been in this industry for 47 years as an engineer, and started in the machine shops as a teenager, so have over 50 years around machine work.
    I put a LOT of stock in manners and how a person expresses themselves. The fact you did thank us speaks well of you, but remember that us oldtimers, while no strangers to "cuss words", maintain a certain degree of civility with each other. I am sure you will enjoy this 'board and welcome you to it.

    Since you have expressed an interest in what we discuss here, and since you are from NY State, I will put an idea out to you. Google "Hanford Mills Museum". It is a working sawmill/woodworking mill up near Oneonta, NY in Delaware County. I teach a course there called "Steam Power 101", which is a "hands on" course in the Hanford Mills steam plant and goes into the historic, engineering, practical skills, and operation of a steam plant. I will also be teaching another course there on basic design and construction of small firetube boilers. We get people attending who do not know a pound per square in (PSI) from a Horsepower (HP), and we bring them along in the Steam Power 101 course. We teach about such things as babbitted bearings, pipefitting, machinery erecting and levelling, steam engine principals, boiler principals, and all sorts of topics that people who work on old machine tools, old engines, or are just interested in general enjoy learning about. We never teach quite the same course as I vary it to suit what the group wants to discuss and learn about. We have a lot of fun, and people who took the course years ago come back as alumni and we have a kind of reunion. It is over a weekend, so some of the participants camp out nearby with their wives and families. On that Saturday night, there is a campfire, and we gather around it and swap stories and enjoy the evening. It's a good solid group of people, and we are unafraid to tangle up with pretty nearly anything. You can join us for Steam Power 101 if you like, or simply plan a visit to Hanford Mills and see some of what is discussed on this 'board- line shafting, flat belting, and old machinery- in action. As you said in your closing sentence: "If this comes to NY, I will put my hands on it". Well, here is your opportunity. Meet the old farts, dinosaurs, mad scientists and mad machinists. We do not, as a rule, use anything more high-tech than a flip phone (and we are glad there is NO cell service in a good part of our hills). Using the computer is a convenience, but we are of the breed who still grinds high speed steel lathe tool bits by eye, sharpens twist drills freehand, cuts gaskets from cat litter box cardboard, uses pieces of welding rod can or olive oil tins for shim stock, still stick welds and oxyacetylene brazes, and still make our drawings freehand or on a drawing board with pencils and instruments rather than CAD. We know how to rebuild a carburetor and set the floats and adjust ignition points, and often prefer driving vehicles with manual transmissions. Oldtimers, for sure. Come join us, as we may be geographically closer than you knew.

  24. #56
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    28,380
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Keith Taylor shared this - thanks Keith!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails epson_01112019065357.jpg  

  25. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    ny usa
    Posts
    384
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    243

    Default

    Joe:

    In no way shape or form was I referring to you (as a bad guy. You're one of the easy going good guys). Also, in no way, shape or form do I need to come across as tough. Been there, done that. I'm pretty sure you know exactly whom I was referencing. The "fuckers" is how I am, even to customers at my shop. I've been working in shops since I was 8, and the language sticks. I actually speak like that in front of my mom, and get smacked for it about every 3 minutes. Pretty sure you guys have heard worse, and can differentiate between expression and degredation. I really don't give a shit if I offend anyone. It's just who I am. I'd say I'm sorry, but why lie to you?

    That said, this thread kicks ass, and yes, I've actually (previously) been keeping up with you, along with Jim (I think Rozen, up in shandaken?). You guys know a lot, and share a lot. We all appreciate that.
    Yeah, I'm in goshen/middletown area. I have to tell you, I'm probably a bigger di46 in person than I am on the internet, but whatever. You've dedicated way more typing towards me than necessary, but, as soon as I get some "spare" time, I will try to meet you. That would be cool.

    Anywho, about this railroad.......

  26. #58
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    17,472
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1620
    Likes (Received)
    2802

    Default

    Just substitute "you jaybirds" and you've got it......

  27. #59
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    ny usa
    Posts
    384
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    243

    Default

    Stupid jaybirds! Eh, doesn't roll off the tongue nicely. Fuckers. Take me or leave me. Even if I had feelings, I still want to see more trains.

  28. #60
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    17,472
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1620
    Likes (Received)
    2802

    Default

    Did anyone else notice that Mr Shattock made his boiler separate from the smokebox? In one of the films, he fits the boiler in, and you see that the fore end of the boiler slides into the smokebox that is already on the frames. That was another clue that suggested the steel boiler was not his.

    It makes sense to do that, I don't know that I have seen many others done that way, though.

    "Jaybirds" is of a lower order, when referring to people you are in a position to give friendly insults to.
    Last edited by JST; 01-11-2019 at 11:49 PM.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
2