Alba 1A - teardown and inspection - Page 5
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  1. #81
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    It's sad that PB messed up your post so badly JPL123. None of your photo's show here.

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    JPL,

    Yes - sux re the photos. I spent a long time on getting those resized to be nice and large in the thread. Oh well. I did it for others - like you - to come along and see stuff and add to the pool of knowledge re the 1A's,

    Hopefully you can see the pics on PB. I have made them public:

    http://s1066.photobucket.com/user/St...eardown?sort=3

    I think the pics you are after are on page 4 and 5.

    Re taper pins, they could test the patience of the dalai lama. Heat the cam etc, tap, support, tap, heat.

    Greg.

    EDIT: I have been meaning to get back to this thread to finish it off. The shaper is now all back together and I am using it. Will post some pics soon-ish.

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  4. #83
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    Here in the US we have a great penetrating oil by the name of "Kroil", it has such small molecules that it almost seems to go through solid cast iron! (It doesn't, of course, unless there are leaks or cracks)

    I normally heat the stuck hub/gear/handle etc that has the stuck taper pin the night before to several hundred degrees, not enough to change the base metal color, then dose it at all entry points and leave it to cool.

    If it doesn't come out with a few sharp raps of a ball peen I drill it from the small end through where the big end hole stops, then insert a punch into that so the blows are pulling the weakened sidewalls of the taper pin out.
    That has to be done with care so that the drill is centered on both ends, a mill is nice for that.

    The advantage is that the original tapered hole should not be damaged by this method.

  5. #84
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    In my experience, it is easier to remove taper pins with a couple of fairly substantial blows, than many gentle ones.
    Of course, the part should be supported very well and the small end identified positively (almost always it helps if you cut it flush with the surface and file all the burs before attempting anything).
    The many gentle blows tend to deform the exposed part of the pin, upsetting it, without having enough energy to dislodge it.
    The part holding the pin should be supported rigidly, in contact either with the soil or with the rest of the machine. If you use instead a mass held by a helper in contact with the part, make sure that such mass is either of soft metal (e.g. lead, copper) or put some vibration damping material (e.g. leather, hardwood, etc.) between the mass and the piece. The mass should be at least ten times the weight of the hammer you're using: you want to avoid that it would start to bounce off while you're still transferring energy to the pin with your blow.
    Use a drift punch almost as large as the small end of the pin that you want to displace.

    Paolo

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    I'm going to try sending a photo directly from my PC;
    index.jpeg

  7. #86
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    Eriksen shaper;
    eriksenshaper.jpg

    Well, that worked.

  8. #87
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    BTW, if you look closely at the layout of the Eriksen you can clearly see the ancestry in design related to the Alba, Torpex, Royal, Viceroy and at least two others I can't think of right now. I mean here the two meshing gears that can be chosen to engage ratchets feeding either cross feeds or vertical table feeds from the same eccentric. Another common feature to several is the eccentric tool head clamp and the two speed internal gears at the rear of the main body.

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    Hi; I'm new to this forum, so please feel free to correct me if I do something wrong!
    First, StrayAlien, I must give you a big THANK YOU for putting all this stuff on this thread. I just bought an Invicta type 1M which appears identical to your Alba, and your thread has saved me hours of work in stripping it down; several parts were seized, and your thread gave me the confidence to hit with a hammer bits I would have otherwise been reluctant to attack. You mentioned somewhere that you had some service information for this machine; where did you get it from? is it still available? your machine does look really great; well done to you.
    Regards, Suffolk Brian, East Anglia, England.

  10. #89
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    AS you may know,these machines were sold by the B.Elliott Co,who also traded as Victoria Machine Tool Co,and various other names..........Usually the machines have BEC in the serial no.The "LathesUK" site may have some information....Beware of one quirk,tho.....at max stroke ,sometimes the operating arm will collide with the inside of the frame,breaking the forked end....therefore dont try for max stroke without carefully hand turning the machine....The bullgear is cast iron and often a few teeth that take all the wear will be near gone....check this before spending any time/money .

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  12. #90
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    Suffolk Brian, thank you. That is precisely why this thread exists - to gives others confidence that it can be done. I am by no means experienced at such things but faced with tearing it down there was no such resource. If it saved an old machine then cool.

    I am also very happy the photos have come back. They went AWOL there when photobucket changed their policy.

    I got your PM, I'll respond to your questions there.

    Greg.


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