American Tool Works Radial Drill - need born date
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  1. #1
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    Default American Tool Works Radial Drill - need born date

    Acquired a American Tool Works 9" column, 3' arm radial drill. Overall in good shape, does need some minor work on the arm swivel brake and feed clutch, maybe adjustment will take care of it, not sure yet. I would like to
    know the manufacture date. The serial number is (see pic) 70067, 47. I would guess from the mid thirties to mid forties.
    Maybe John O. would know?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_1505.jpg   img_1507.jpg   img_1508.jpg   img_1509.jpg  

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    1947 for certain, Lathes use the same format

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    1947. I have the same machine.
    J.O beat me to it.

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    John and Hobby thanks for info.
    Any guesses on date range for the manufacturing run of this model?
    Mid 30's to 1950?

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    Don't know about when, but you could say that they had plenty of time to get them right

    Scan from 1919
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails atw-radial-drill-teens.jpg  

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    That's one fine looking machine. Congratulations. FWIW (which ain't much) I have a similar sized drill and I find I am using it much more than I had anticipated. They are just a lot of fun to run.

    John

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    The real joy of a big radial is power tapping a bunch of big holes. I used to dread big pipe flanges with 12 or 16 3/4 or 7/8" holes before we got the radial drill at work. I look forward to them now. The machine st work has a tapping feature that uses a microswitch to reverse the spindle at a preset depth. Even on blind holes, you just set the depth, hit the GO button and engage the tap. Other than moving the arm and head to the next hole, that is all the effort required of the operator.

    Get a more detailed pic of the head controls and I can probably tell you if that machine has a similar feature. It probably does, given that it is a post-war machine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldisnew View Post
    John and Hobby thanks for info.
    Any guesses on date range for the manufacturing run of this model?
    Mid 30's to 1950?
    I’d take a guess and say you’re about spot on. This scan is from 1937. Thanks to the guys at Vintage Machinery for the great site.
    http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1004/3605.pdf

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobby Shop View Post
    I’d take a guess and say you’re about spot on. This scan is from 1937. Thanks to the guys at Vintage Machinery for the great site.
    http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1004/3605.pdf
    I think johnoder got there first with the definitive answer of 1947.

    Regards Tyrone.

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