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  1. #1
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    Default Another Old Hendy

    Can hendeyman put a date on this lathe for me? #7646

    My brother is getting sick of looking at it in his garage and wants it to go away. The more info I have on it, I might be able to convince him it's worth keeping around. At least until I get my barn built.

    Andy
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_2789.jpg   img_5582.jpg  
    Last edited by Hobby Shop; 04-13-2017 at 02:35 PM.

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    That would be HENDEY - although there was a Hendy machine works back in the day.

    Joshua Hendy Iron Works - History | VintageMachinery.org

    Classic machine. Yours is the machine a Putnam user dreamed about - in 1928.

    Joe in NH

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe in NH View Post
    That would be HENDEY - although there was a Hendy machine works back in the day.

    Joshua Hendy Iron Works - History | VintageMachinery.org

    Classic machine. Yours is the machine a Putnam user dreamed about - in 1928.

    Joe in NH
    Thanks for the correction Joe.
    I tried to edit the title to Hendey but I'm to late. 1928, I would've thought it was a little bit older than that.
    Andy

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    Hobby Shop:

    Hendey lathe #7646, a 12x5 Cone Head model, was built on October 21, 1905. It was shipped with a set of No.2 Collets and a new box,
    which was the recently introduced Compound Gear Box. The original owner was the Diamond Crystal Salt Company, St. Clair, Michigan.
    There are no longer any Patterns, Castings or Repair Parts left in inventory for this lathe, but all of the original drawings are
    still in the files, so parts can be made if required,

    Hendeyman

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    Am I wrong or this lathe does not have any cross-feed? I don't see any knob for the second clutch in the apron.

    Paolo

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    Quote Originally Posted by hendeyman View Post
    Hobby Shop:

    Hendey lathe #7646, a 12x5 Cone Head model, was built on October 21, 1905. It was shipped with a set of No.2 Collets and a new box,
    which was the recently introduced Compound Gear Box. The original owner was the Diamond Crystal Salt Company, St. Clair, Michigan.
    There are no longer any Patterns, Castings or Repair Parts left in inventory for this lathe, but all of the original drawings are
    still in the files, so parts can be made if required,

    Hendeyman
    Thanks for the info.
    My brother found it in a barn, in St. Clair Mi.
    Andy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paolo_MD View Post
    Am I wrong or this lathe does not have any cross-feed? I don't see any knob for the second clutch in the apron.

    Paolo
    It has cross feed but not power cross feed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hobby Shop View Post
    It has cross feed but not power cross feed.
    That's what I meant.

    Paolo

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    My 1901? Joshua Rose Modern Machine Shop Practice has a wood cut of that apron's internals - very bare looking in there

    Quote Originally Posted by Paolo_MD View Post
    That's what I meant.

    Paolo

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    I would've thought it was a little bit older than that.
    As it turned out, you were correct!

    And yes, I threw 1928 as a date of envy - but even by 1905 Putnam was on its way out - and a 1928 user of a Putnam would be thoroughly disgusted with his frugal shop owners for not upgrading.

    (Ah, the attraction of "modernity")

    I remember walking into a machine shop in Northfield, VT in the 1970s looking for steel. Along the wall I spy a lathe, pretty large perhaps 24" swing, with box tail stock and loose change gears.

    "Wow. What a neat old machine!" I exclaimed to the shop owner. It might have been a Putnam for all I knew then.

    "What? You like that clapped out, beat up, old boat anchor of a lathe?"

    The owner couldn't understand the attraction. Of course he had stood for many hours in front of it trying to make it do what it seemingly was no longer capable.

    Or perhaps he was transmitting 20th century machinist values/skill onto a 19th century machine?

    Machine tools have improved - in some ways. And maybe to the detriment of skill.

    Joe in NH

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    Paolo MD:

    Power Cross Feed was not a standard feature on the 12 inch lathes until at least 1907, when the new Geared Head lathe was introduced.
    Before that time, a 12 inch lathe could be fitted with Power Cross Feed at an extra cost when the lathe was ordered.

    Hendeyman

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    Joe -

    I have to laugh. Spent from fall of 1966 to spring of 1970 in Northfield - and never even realized there was a machine shop in town. But I guess with the machine shop downstairs in the ME building I never had to go looking when I needed something.

    Dale


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