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Thread: Antique Planer

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goat Marshall View Post
    My planer has a three pulley shifter with one belt, and its pulleys are crowned. Maybe it's weird. I think it helps it to stay in neutral.

    When I set up my dynamo I put a cast iron pulley on it--5 inch diameter, I think it is? It's driven by a 60 inch pulley from straight above, so there's not a great deal of wrap on the lower pulley, and it would slip off up around 20 amps. The pulley had a flaw of some kind--a crack or something--so after a few years I replaced it with a new paper one. WOW! Much better! I don't think I've ever had that paper one slip. So that sure agrees with the test and paper pulleys. If you find that article, Robert, I'd like to read it. Sounds interesting.

    Hope you don't mind if we've gotten a tad off topic, Emccorp.
    I found the article on pulleys a long time ago. I read it but never kept the link or downloaded it.
    I think it was American Machinist but it could have been Machinery Magazine.

    I must clarify my comments in post #36.
    I am talking about the upper drive pulleys and not the driven pulleys, which is what emccorp was first talking about.
    I can't say about what the driven pulleys on other planers are.
    On a three pulley two belt driven system, on the planer, the upper (overhead) two drive pulleys would have no crown, such as the New Haven in post #34.

    Rob

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    Got it got it got it. Of course. I'm just confusing things here. Sorry 'bout that. I think I'll disappear for awhile.

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    ROb: Where did you get these pictures?. Do you have an ames brochure.
    I ask because i have a large lathe that came out ot the same shop as my ames planer. 30" swing x 9' between centers.
    Did ames make a lathe this large. It was sold by the marshall hushcart machinery co. Chicago il. It is unusual as the
    lead screw for threading and the half nut is on the back of the machine. The machine has no mfg. name on it. I found that the
    Marshall Huschart machinery co was supposed to be the oldest machinery distributor in the u.s.
    Richard

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    Quote Originally Posted by emccorp View Post
    ROb: Where did you get these pictures?. Do you have an ames brochure.
    I ask because i have a large lathe that came out ot the same shop as my ames planer. 30" swing x 9' between centers.
    Did ames make a lathe this large. It was sold by the marshall hushcart machinery co. Chicago il. It is unusual as the
    lead screw for threading and the half nut is on the back of the machine. The machine has no mfg. name on it. I found that the
    Marshall Huschart machinery co was supposed to be the oldest machinery distributor in the u.s.
    Richard
    If you could get us pix, we could make a stab at "name that lathe."

    It was "usual" for a time between 1850 and 1875 for the lead screw to be located to the rear. I would say more usual for machines made in Worcester, MA, but the practice was not exclusively theirs. I own a Flather Lathe (Nashua, NH) which has a rear-mounted lead screw and half nuts which I have traced down to 1873 - but after 1876 even Flather mostly moved the lead screw to the front.

    By 1880 almost all makers had the lead screw front mounted, which offers several advantages of a half-nut kind.

    So you're definitely indicating to us an "earlyish" lathe.

    Joe in NH

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    Quote Originally Posted by emccorp View Post
    Rob: Where did you get these pictures?. Do you have an ames brochure.
    I ask because i have a large lathe that came out ot the same shop as my ames planer. 30" swing x 9' between centers.
    Did ames make a lathe this large.
    Richard
    The pictures come from a variety of sources.
    Some from trade publications of the day that are on the internet, some from catalogs I have.
    Some from catalogs that are on the internet and some from fellow collectors.

    I have a pdf of an 1872 Ames catalog. They indicate (no picture or illustration) a 32 inch swing lathe.
    Ames also had the lead screw on the back.

    Rob

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    Thanks for the responses. I will try to get some pictures posted in a day or so. The dimensions of the machine are:
    bed lgn 14-1/4' Width 27" height off floor 28" face plate is 30" dia. Center to Center 9' Doubt steady rest is original. There is power feed on both slides. Also both compound and cross slide have dials. (original or added?.)

    Richardimg_20200311_131508819.jpgimg_20200311_131542837.jpgimg_20200311_131721816.jpg[ATTACH=CONFIG]img_20200311_131903969.jpgimg_20200311_131524307.jpg
    Last edited by emccorp; 03-11-2020 at 03:55 PM.

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    That is a nice lathe Richard but the power feed is on the front of the lathe, the lead screw for threading is on the back side.

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    Quote Originally Posted by emccorp View Post
    Thanks for the responses. I will try to get some pictures posted in a day or so. The dimensions of the machine are:
    bed lgn 14-1/4' Width 27" height off floor 28" face plate is 30" dia. Center to Center 9' Doubt steady rest is original. There is power feed on both slides. Also both compound and cross slide have dials. (original or added?.)
    Fifield, Lowell, MA.
    Probably around 1890 for vintage.

    Rob

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    Thanks. Any idea who may have made it?.
    Richard

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    Quote Originally Posted by emccorp View Post
    Thanks. Any idea who may have made it?.
    Richard
    George W. Fifield, Lowell, MA.

    Rob

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    Thanks Rob. I did not notice the Fifield note on your original reply.
    I looked at vintage machinery and found him in the mfg. index.
    The engraving they have looks just like my machine. Wonder why he did not
    put his name on the machine.
    Richard

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    Wonder why he did not put his name on the machine.
    May have been removed by the retailer, or a "plate stealer."

    They make fashionable belt-buckles, even in the early part of the 20th century.

    If you get to the point where you clean up this machine you may find where it was mounted.

    The "1" is nice.

    Joe in NH

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    Here is what the name plate would look like.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails fifield-7_li.jpg  

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    Thanks to both of you for this information. Never thought of a plate stealer or the retailer removing the plate. Where did Rob get this picture?. Do you have one of these machines?. I have used this machine before to do some large castings that were pretty close tolerance. About 18" dia. Did a very good job. Machine has very little wear on the bed towards the head stock as you would expect of a machine used a lot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by emccorp View Post
    Thanks to both of you for this information. Never thought of a plate stealer or the retailer removing the plate. Where did Rob get this picture?. Do you have one of these machines?.
    I think it was from a craigslist ad that was posted on the PM some time ago.
    Here is another better picture of a Fifield tag.

    I use to have a large Fifield lathe. I think the swing was around 22".
    A friend bought it from me to donate to the Glover Machine Works Museum.
    Glover at one time had a Fifield lathe.
    This is now part of the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History.
    This lathe was from the time when it was called the Fifield Tool Co.

    Pictures of the lathe in the museum.
    Link to a picture of the head stock with name plate.
    All sizes | Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History 2013, 1865 Fifield & Company lathe, Glover Machine Shop | Flickr - Photo Sharing!


    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails fifield-9.jpg   fifield-10.jpg   fifield-11.jpg   fifield-12.jpg  

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