Anyone know what this tool is
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  1. #1
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    Default Anyone know what this tool is

    anyone have a clue what this is?

    img-0941.jpgimg-0940.jpg

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    It is the earliest known figit spinner, first fabricated in siberia out of native materials... (sorry, could not resist. welcome to the forum, ) Jim

    on second glance however it looks like a center finder of some sort, perhaps to be used on some type of bolted flange maybe?

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    Size? Any markings? Do the parts slip/slide? What can you say about what look like the 3 square screwheads? Where did the thing turn up? Can't see a lot of detail in your photographs.

    -Marty-

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    Those are very dangerous!!! Fortunately for you, I'm an authorized disposal person and can safely get rid of that for you. I even offer free shipping!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Feldman View Post
    Size? Any markings? Do the parts slip/slide? What can you say about what look like the 3 square screwheads? Where did the thing turn up? Can't see a lot of detail in your photographs.

    -Marty-
    those are some great comments ;-) thanks for the welcome guys. there are scribe points at the end of the three legs. the center nut loosens allowing you to position the points where ever you want. each leg is about 2" long. the only markings i found said "patent applied for"...

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    Replied to you in the other thread where you asked this question.

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    oh and i should have mentioned it came out of a machinists tool box auction lot. I got some pretty cool items and all are 75 to 100 years old. My guess its some type of scribing layout tool.... its definitely meant to be adjustable.

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    I suspect it intended use is to locate holes when replicating a part from a master (versus from blueprint). Best accuracy would require three holes to be already located and drilled. Position the three tips in the three holes and adjust the tool so that the center hole is located perfectly over the fourth hole. A nice fitting punch is used both for setting the tool "precisely" and for marking the location on the new part.
    When used for locating the third hole, you use the third tip both for locating and for marking (I assume htey're hardened).

    Paolo

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    makes sense that it could be used for this purpose.... It's pretty small for this use, with all legs spread out I would estimate the radius of the pins at just about 3+ inches. Yours is the most logical identification so far!

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    It's used by clockmakers when replacing bushes, or when replicating hole positions in a new plate. Two pins are located into reference holes somewhere on the plate, the third pin is located into the hole for the bushing, then the tool is tightened and set aside. After a new bushing is installed, the third pin is used to mark the center.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry J. View Post
    It's used by clockmakers when replacing bushes, or when replicating hole positions in a new plate. Two pins are located into reference holes somewhere on the plate, the third pin is located into the hole for the bushing, then the tool is tightened and set aside. After a new bushing is installed, the third pin is used to mark the center.
    YES - That is it.


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