Anyone Recognize this 4 Cyl Air Cooled Engine? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    I see a crank dog for a crank handle starter......I still think it may be a WW1 trench pump.........Im surprised it has a centre bearing.....most little industrial fours are just two balls or rollers.....The conrods are definitely industrial ...to clunky for revs.

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    Something to consider, how were the cam lobes lubricated? Possible it had a oil path or drip system.it makes my wonder if it maybe a prototype or first model.

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    not a match, but for perspective a good example of how it may have been set up-

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HrMVqMKs1_c

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    I can recommend the Smokstak forum, try posting the photos over there. I posted photos of an obscure little 4 cylinder engine and had it identified (Sterling c.1914-15).

    This is the forum for multi cylinder engines: Multi-Cylinder Stationary Engines and Power Units - SmokStak

    BTW, engines of that era did not need a bell housing, the gearbox might have been separate and the clutch and flywheel exposed.

    The air-cooled engine is pretty small i.e. 1152cc, perhaps enough for a a cycle car or maybe a small generating set.

    I have seen one or two air-cooled fours on Smokstak, one of the most interesting being an International 1910 Model F Roadster. It is OHC however. Here is a similar model:

    1910 International Harvester Model F roadster | Richard Spiegelman | Flickr

    Delco made a 4 cylinder air-cooled generator, e.g. YouTube

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  7. #45
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    My G-ma still tells stories about those old barely lit Delco lights.


    The Wauseon show is just down the road from me.


    --------------

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

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    I wouldnt be surprised if its a one off........the rocker/lifters all look individually made,no two are exactly identical,as though hand forged,and the design is impractical.....although making an early engine was a minefield of patent protection on every concievable feature that made a practical engine.......everyone knows Henry Ford refused to pay a 16c /car royalty on the oil level dipstick,and so no T had a dipstick,but rather level taps.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    I wouldnt be surprised if its a one off........the rocker/lifters all look individually made,no two are exactly identical,as though hand forged,and the design is impractical.....although making an early engine was a minefield of patent protection on every concievable feature that made a practical engine.......everyone knows Henry Ford refused to pay a 16c /car royalty on the oil level dipstick,and so no T had a dipstick,but rather level taps.....
    I was thinking the crank was pretty crude even for an old engine.

    Funny the bit about Ford and the dipstick

    Grandfather worked Cambridge Assembly, told me stories as a kid that have since become more famous. Like how the shipping crates were spec'ed very particularly, then were broken down at the factory for floorboards

    smaat old fascist that henry

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    Every schoolchild knows how Henry Ford defeated the Selden patent owners ,and beat the "bad guys who were monopolising motorcar patents"..........but dont know that the "bad guys" were famous americans including Thomas A Edison and Alexander Graham Bell.

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    The Father Of All Patent Trolls
    Selden was a patent troll

    Ford was not a good man, but he was correct on this one

    Interestingly it was pics of a model T crank that led to my comment WRT the crank on this motor

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Every schoolchild knows how Henry Ford defeated the Selden patent owners ,and beat the "bad guys who were monopolising motorcar patents"..........but dont know that the "bad guys" were famous americans including Thomas A Edison and Alexander Graham Bell.
    Edison was way worse than Ford. His "Menlo Park" think tank did little more than hire geniuses to create things which he, Edison, then owned the patents on. Most notably was a gentleman by the name of Nikola Tesla. Edison offered $50,000 to the person who could solve the problems early electric motors were having. Tesla did it, and presented the solution to Edison. When he asked Edison to pay up, Edison laughed it off as a joke, telling the young immigrant that he didn't understand "American humor." Edison was a businessman, treated his employees horribly, and tended to have history written his way because he paid for it.

    Case in point, the Smithsonian Museum has, on display, an improved electric motor in an exibit dedicated to Edison. However... this motor was built much later, after Tesla had moved on and was working for Westinghouse. George Westinghouse, it seemed, let his employees own the patents they invented. So the electric motor, sitting in the Edison display in the Smithsonia, has a brass plate with a patent number on it. That patent was recorded in the name of Nikola Tesla...

    So, many years later, Tesla still gets the last laugh. As he so famously said;

    "I don't care that they steal my ideas. I do care that they don't have any of their own."


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