Axial piston diesel on craigslist. What is it?
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  1. #1
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    Default Axial piston diesel on craigslist. What is it?

    Ran across this and never seen anything like it.

    Deisel engine, axial (barrel) type - tools - by owner - sale

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  3. #2
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    Has SWASH plate(?s) to turn reciprocation into rotary

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    Never heard of a Rogers.....says its heavy .......300lb is light IMHO.......looks like a fair bit missing.....Sterling series built crankless diesels pre WW2,only major production I know of.

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    One thing is certain.......your neighbor doesn't have one like it.

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    A quick Google drew a blank on anything that looks like that.

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    That is really interesting:-)

    Looks like an experimental engine with those standard bearing b on the axel.

    One for Doug.

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    I seem to recall a swash plate motor is torpedo tech. Sure not out of a farm tractor.

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    Interesting, I thought " torpedo" soon as I saw it also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    A quick Google drew a blank on anything that looks like that.
    Torpedo propulsion, "some say". Just not this one.

    Was on the East Coast, I'd be on it like stink on s**t, just for the novelty of it.

    No match for a conventional recip on longevity, let-alone economics of production, but awesome for compact size and short-term power to mass ratio. Torpedoes tending to be single-use, but high-budget, gadgetry, as they are.

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    Doesnt seem to be listed in the "douglas-self"/MUSEUM OF POWER site,which is pretty comprehensive......Anyone got a copy of "Some Unusual Engines" by LJK Setright.?

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Doesnt seem to be listed in the "douglas-self"/MUSEUM OF POWER site,which is pretty comprehensive......Anyone got a copy of "Some Unusual Engines" by LJK Setright.?
    Dunno if it covers this one, Rogers MAIN biz was conventional recips. Or "mostly" conventional:

    Trade catalogs from Rogers Diesel and Aircraft Co. | National Museum of American History

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    Quote Originally Posted by Billtodd View Post
    That is really interesting:-)

    Looks like an experimental engine with those standard bearing b on the axel.

    One for Doug.
    Hey !

    Leave me out of this eh ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Doesnt seem to be listed in the "douglas-self"/MUSEUM OF POWER site,which is pretty comprehensive......Anyone got a copy of "Some Unusual Engines" by LJK Setright.?
    Yup. Nothing I can see about Rogers in the Setright book. Some detail about the Bristol Tramway Company device and pictures of the Sterling (Sherman design) and Hermann devices of similar layout with extended captions.

    [Considering Setright was (supposed to be) a historian trying to nail down specific information in his books is a total PIA as he tends to jump around like a grasshopper on speed mentioning the same thing in several different places. Indexing rarely helps as it varies between desultory and indifferent. Tempted to annotate my copies of his books but the margins are too small.]

    Clive

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    Clive mentioned the Bristol Tramway Co. in the context of these unusual engines.

    Charles Redrup was a prolific and restless inventor who was fascinated by piston engines of all orientations. He patented an axial piston engine in 1917. In the 1930s he was engaged in developing an axial piston engine for the Bristol Tramway and Carriage Co, who made their own buses and engines. The final development was the RR4, a 9-cylinder petrol (gasoline) engine which developed 145 HP at 2900 rpm. It was a promising engine, but the company's new owners pulled the plug, probably because conventional diesels were the way forward.

    An example of the RR4 was on display at the Bristol Museum, but the plug was pulled on that admired institution, too, and after a long absence and much expenditure it re-emerged as the 'M Shed', where the engine now resides in storage.

    The RR4's axial pistons acted on a 'wobble plate'. Redrup carried on developing engines into the early 1950s, expanding his axial piston repertoire from wobble plates to pistons acting on cams (the pistons had collars which engaged in sinusoidal grooves machined in a central rotor). Manchester Museum of Science & Industry have a demonstration model and parts of a prototype aircraft engine on display. See:-

    Charles Benjamin Redrup - Graces Guide

    It would be interesting to know the nature of the innards of the Rogers engine.

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    Anyone who likes really weird engines ought to browse through the 1939 edition of Aerosphere.

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    Cool engine- I agree, if it were closer (and cheaper ) I'd pick it up just for the fun factor.

    Can't agree on it being a torpedo engine- mainly because it has air cooling fins on it.

    Also, I'm not sure anyone ever used a diesel engine in a torpedo. Most use exotic fuels, one of which is typically a strong oxidizer- not sure how long you could get a small diesel to run on a tank of compressed air.

    Doc.

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    Interestingly Charles Redrup worked with Barnes Wallace on the bouncing bomb. I believe he developed the drive that spun the bombs before they were dropped.

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    There is an axial piston swash plate aero engine in the Air Force Museum in Dayton Ohio, It looks similar according to my hazy memory.

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    Now thats cool!

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    Look for book called The Knife and Fork Man, it's the story of Redrups life and his inventions.


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