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  1. #321
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    As I mentioned in a previous post we took a little side trip and have been working on a set of Patterns and core boxes for the Wisconsin engine in a 1917 FWD truck.

    Last week we milled out the patterns and today we finished milling the core boxes.Previously when I made core boxes I fabricated male masters which were then used to cast the actual core boxes in plaster-of-paris. It worked and worked well and to date the core boxes have held up well. Plus if a core box became damaged I could easily cast another.

    This time I decided to make the core boxes out of wood. Like the patterns we used the Tormach 440 we have in my lab space. To say I am pleased with the results would be an understatement!




    Now we can mount the patterns on a backer board, seal and paint it all - then off to the foundry!

    Best regards,

    Terry

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  3. #322
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    Well that was strange... for some reason my photos didn't show up in the last post.
    I use to use Picasa but everything got moved to Google photos. So.... lets try again!





    Here are the patterns mounted on the backer board

  4. #323
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    Tonight I finished up the patterns for the valve covers for the Wisconsin Model "A" engine in Bob's 1917 FWD.

    It felt good to do some simple finishing work which always brings closure and on a project and a whole lot of satisfaction. This was kind of the theme for the day. Today I had to say goodbye to my graduating students - some whom I had in my class for two or three years. Its always a bittersweet moment and it seemed more so this year. We were doing well until one young lady puddled-up then it ran like a fever through the whole class. I did the only thing I could think of... we went over to the neighboring elementary school (with permission) and they played on the playground. Those few moments swinging on the swings and rolling down the hill re-centered them and we made it through the day. What an exceptional group of students! Two will be going to college for mechanical engineering, one for automotive restoration at McPherson and another has a full boat scholarship for Chemical Engineering.

    Anyway... here is the finished pattern and core-box. I just need to add some cross pieces to the bottom of the core boxes.



    Best regards,

    Terry

  5. #324
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    Yesterday, we had a family event near Bangor. I took the opportunity to sneak away and meet Herb at the Maine Forest & Logging museum. We spent a few hours tinkering with the gasoline Lombard.

    From what we can tell this particular machine was built in 1932 and used by Starbird Lumber in Eustis, Maine. It was originally equipped with a 6 cylinder overhead valve Wisconsin D4 (5-3/4x6-1/2)rated at 145 hp at 1,200 rpm and pushing out approx. 700 ft. lb. of torque. In working order it tips the scales at 23,850 lbs. Unfortunately the original engine and chassis were separated many years ago. Its a blast to operate though hearing protection is a must! While we were working the museum was hosting a wedding - I am not sure how the bride and groom felt about the noise!

    While there we cleaned the fuel system, fixed the locking key on the shift lever and took some measurements for the removable panels to cover the drive train.

    This last item is quite important for safety. When your driving this beast the hood and radiator (the top of which is 6'-8" above the ground) blocks out a sizeable chunk of the view - its like sitting in the cab of a locomotive. For safety we like to have a spotter riding on the back platform. However, with the drive train exposed it makes us quite nervous - thus the panels.

    At some point they changed the throttle from the hand quadrant to a wonky foot pedal down by the brake. It works but we all agree we want it gone and go back to the hand throttle.

    We also spent some time filming an ad hoc walk around video. Yes, the hand crank segment at the end is fake - the crank isn't hooked-up but it was fun anyway! I have tried hand cranking Don's machine which has the original T-head Wisconsin - I can get it up on compression but even at 6'-2" and 220 lbs I can't get the leverage to swing it over the top! Our next run will be on October 7th & 8th during Living History day. I am working on getting setup with some period correct clothing. We will also be running our 20 ton steamer.



    Best regards,

    Terry

  6. #325
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    Thanks for another great episode!

  7. #326
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    "For safety we like to have a spotter riding on the back platform. However, with the drive train exposed it makes us quite nervous - thus the panels."

    I understand the safety side of it for the spotter, but man, it is nice seeing the mechanics of the driveline when in use and on display!

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    Quote Originally Posted by pianoman8t8 View Post
    "I understand the safety side of it for the spotter, but man, it is nice seeing the mechanics of the driveline when in use and on display!"
    I agree. Fortunately they will be in sections and easily removed for display and maintenance- there are umpteen grease fittings in there but its a lot less than the steamer which by my count has approximate 30!

    Plus the machine is on loan so we cannot do anything that would be permanent.

    Here is a photo of the original engine.

    wisconsin-d.jpg

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  10. #328
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    The picture shows they were proud of their "Nichol chrome" alloy cylinders.

  11. #329
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    That does not appear to be the same enginee you are working on . Later model?

  12. #330
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    Correct! Around 1931 they changed to the D4 with overhead valves. My engine is the model PT which is a T-head.

  13. #331
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    As I ponder the task of casting the babbitt bearings for the big Wisconsin I have been working on a number of other projects.

    One task was reverse engineering a unique proprietary magneto coupling used by Wisconsin. It was designed and patented by by A.F. Milbarth in 1915. Milbarth was one of the founding partners of the Wisconsin Motor Manufacturing Co.

    Anyway, a collector had a need so I couldn't resit the challenge (fun - really it is!). Using the patent drawings and measurements of the few surviving parts we "reverse engineered" it. Then it was time to create the 3D models and assemblies. From these we generated the 2D shop drawings. As I tell my students - while the 3D renderings are cool its the shop drawings that are THE most important deliverable. Next we will mill the patterns out using the CNC mill. All good fun! Interestingly the drive disk leather.





    Meanwhile Peter was hard at work in his foundry casting valve covers using the patterns and core boxes we made earlier (see earlier post) These were for a 1918 FED truck but in addition to fitting the Wisconsin Model 'A' T-head engine used by FWD, Stutz etc. they will also fit the Wisconsin model 'L', G AND 'J' as well as the marine variant (AM, LM, GM & JM)



    I just love this stuff!

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  15. #332
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    My time flies!

    Here we are close to the end of another year and the big beast still isn't running! But that's all my fault. When school is in there just isn't enough time in the day and this summer we had a lot going on family wise.

    That's the way it goes! My plan for the coming year is to pour the babbitt for the Mains and the connecting rods. I priced out having this done by a professional shop and while they are no doubt a top notch facility and do incredible work its just not affordable. So... after discussions with my friend Joe I am convinced I can do it myself. The hardest part will be the babbitt tips on the thick shims. I am thinking I can make a jig and mold to hold the shim and then cast these. When line bored they will be cut to match the finished bearing dia.

    In the photo below you can see what I am talking about.


    img_1140.jpg

    Below is one of the main bearing inserts - this shows clearly why they need to be replaced.

    img_1138.jpg

    While I have been mulling over this I have been working on some other projects - one is reverse engineering a Milbrath Magneto coupling for a collector. This was proprietary design developed by Arthur Milbrath who was also one of the founding partners of Wisconsin Motor Manufacturing. Currently I am working on finishing-up the patterns

    assembly-1-.jpg


    img_1168.jpg

    Another project was 3D scanning the "impossible" part. This is the last water fitting for the big T-head I need to develop a set of patterns for. My students named it the impossible part. They have looked at it as a challenge to their 3D modeling abilities. Alas... all have failed - the part is simply to organic and with the two 90 degree bends and tapper and radius it simply doesn't adhere to the laws of geometry. A few weeks ago I took a professional development day and traveled to Orono for a meeting. Since I was just upstairs I took the original (loaned by Don) down to the Advanced Manufacturing Facility at the University of Maine at Orono. John Belding and Noah had graciously offered to scan it for me. Now that its scanned I can generate the pattern and core box and either CNC or 3D print them.

    img_1216.jpg




    Best regards,

    Terry

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  17. #333
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    Oh...Oh... and since I was only a few miles away Herb, Lew and I went over to the museum to "check if the battery was charged in the Lombard."



    We have a bit of work to do to the beast - it was running rather rough at the end (you can hear it popping etc. in the video) which I think is water in the fuel - large fuel tank + little fuel over a lengthy period of time = lots of moist air = phase separation = water laden ethanol dropping to the bottom of the tank. Also the tracks need adjusting and we want to remove the crazy foot throttle and change it back to the steering column mounted lever and quadrant. But... I simply love this beast!

    I think I need to take more professional development days!

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  19. #334
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    there is a Lombard locally,doesnt seem to have ever been restored.Big flathead Wisconsin like yours,the tracks are a fascinating way to get around Caterpillar patents.Severe wear in the "roller chain" but it still goes OK.

  20. #335
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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    there is a Lombard locally,doesnt seem to have ever been restored.Big flathead Wisconsin like yours,the tracks are a fascinating way to get around Caterpillar patents.Severe wear in the "roller chain" but it still goes OK.


    John I would be interested in seeing some photos of it. My thought is it's probably a Linn. H.H. Linn worked for Lombard in the early years and than patented and put it into production his own design. Linn survived into the 1950's and are far more common than Lombards. I have no record of Lombard exporting to Australia but then the records are not complete. However they did export a number of machines to the Dutch East Indies and Japan and approximately 100 to Russia (1917-1918)

    Interestingly Lombard didn't have to work around the Caterpillar/Holt patents! He filed his first patent and had a working machine in late 1900 and soon went into production - beating Holt by a considerable margin since Holt's patent didn't appear until 1907. In fact the Brits named a mountain in Antarctica in Lombard's honor) When Holt sued CL Best - Best claimed protection under the Lombard patents. As a result Lombard, at the urging of CL Best, went after Holt in a countersuit. Over the years a confusing series of suits and countersuits were filed until Holt settled with Lombard out of court in Lombard's favor and purchased rights to the Lombard patents. Best, Cletrac, Phoenix and I am sure a few others all purchased patent rights from Lombard. during the lawsuit Lombard claimed that Holt had developed his design after examining a Lombard that was sold to a Lumber company in Lathrop Montana. This machine was built to a patent filed by Lombard in 1905. Here are photos of the Lathrop, Montana machine that were submitted as evidence:

    scan0020.jpg

    scan0021.jpg


    Best regards,

    Terry

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  22. #336
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    You're right,it must be a Linn.....havent seen it for a while.

  23. #337
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    Hi Terry
    Not been on the site for a while. Glad you're still making progress, that scanner thing was very sci-fi looking.
    All the best

    Steve

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    Over the past few weeks I have been working on the lower water manifold. Of all the parts and assemblies I have had to fabricate this one by far has been the most challenging - which is why I have saved it for last.

    Awhile back I had fabricated some of the patterns and core boxes for the lower water manifold fittings. As it turns out I have to do them all over again! They were OK but not quite right. Fortunately my friend Paul is also restoring an identical motor. A number of years ago he had borrowed many of the fittings off the Lombard at the Maine State Museum and pulled rubber molds from them. Pulling measurements from those as well as the one well used and abused original fitting I have we were able to nail down the dimensions and geometry.

    As usual I developed a 3D model of each components and a complete set of shop drawings. Next I will 3D print a mock-up of the front fitting to see how everything lines-up with the blocks and the water pump. The front fitting is the most critical. Wisconsin used a slip connection and gland nut to connect to a extension pipe coming off of the water pump. If the vertical offset and the horizontal offsets are not correct it won't line-up.

    Interestingly I found my first example of shoddy workmanship on this beast. The 1-1/4" OD pipe runs clear thru the center fitting. On the original, after it was brazed in place some one stick a punch down through the hole in the flange and simple smacked a ragged hole in the wall of the pipe - so much for carefully calculating the flow rate of coolant!

    Anyway, here is the finished 3D model. Once the fit is confirmed with the 3D printed mock-up then I will 3D model the patterns and core boxes and use a combination of 3D printing and the CNC mill and some manual work to fabricate them. Progress right?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails lower-water-manifold-2.jpg   lower-water-manifold-1.jpg   100_0031b.jpg  

  25. #339
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    Work on the lower water manifold has been moving along nicely. I have modeled all the
    Patterns and core boxes and have all the shop drawings ready.

    To connect the lower water manifold to the water pump Wisconsin used a flanged pipe that
    is a slip fit inside the front fitting and is held in place with a big gland nut.

    Because of this the angle and vertical and horizontal offsets of the front fitting
    have to be spot on. With this in mind I 3D printed a mock-up of the fitting and the
    flanged pipe to verify that we have it correct. Thankfully it's a perfect fit! The 3D print isn't perfect
    I forgot to turn on supports which has the printer create a temporary structure to support overhangs.
    Once the print is done the supports can be easily removed. You can see its messed-up near the end
    of the sweeping curve. However this didn't affect the fit.

    Now I can start fabricating the patterns and core boxes. Most of these will be 3D printed.

    On another note... I few weeks ago I visited my Friend Paul. Paul is the gentleman who
    generously loaned his 10 ton Gasoline Lombard to the museum for the past year. He is currently
    working on the remarkable restoration of a steam Lombard. He has been collecting parts for
    it over the last 30 years - mostly digging and dragging them out of the woods.

    Anyway, one item he had is a partial 10 ton Lombard chassis complete with an amazing
    Sterling T-head engine.

    Introduced in 1916 Sterling offered the model "F" is a six cylinder T-Head (5-1/2x6-3/4")
    which was fairly advanced for the day - a dual ignition system using a Berling Magneto and
    Atwater-Kent distributor to spark its dual plug setup. It also had a counter balanced
    crankshaft and full pressure lubrication (3-15 psi was considered good)

    At 1,400 RPM this 962 cid beast could crank-out 148 hp. Lombard offered Sterling
    engines in their 10 ton tractor from 1916 to 1921. Though they were most popular as a
    marine engine I know of only two survivors - this one and one that is running condition -
    Both owned by Paul.

    All good fun!

    Best regards,

    Terry
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_1428.jpg   img_1424.jpg   7-5-2.jpg  

  26. #340
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    So attached are some rendering of the patterns and core boxes. All of these will be 3D printed.
    (I have moved up in technology since I made the previous set!)

    Each of the three fittings requires a five part pattern. Two halves for the body,
    two halves for the neck and a backer. This is because of the need to change the
    angle of pull when the patterns are removed.

    The backer holds the pattern halves in the proper position and maintains the part line
    Once the first halve of the mold is rammed-up and flipped the backer is removed and the other
    sections of the pattern are added than the other half of the mold is rammed-up.

    To remove the patterns the body pieces are removed first followed by the neck/flange pieces.
    Two core boxes are also required for each fitting. The illustration shows a complete
    core and the two core boxes to form it. In reality the core is formed as two separate halves
    which are glued together after curing.

    The curvy cores can cause a few problems. For instance what if they need to be removed from the box
    to be cured (baking etc.)They would need to be supported or else they would loose their shape.
    Back in the day they had a neat method. (see the attached sketch)

    Once the core box was filled and the top struck-off clean a wood frame was built around the box.
    This was then filled with green sand which was struck-off and a plate laid across the top. Next the whole
    works is flipped and the core box and frame removed. Now you have a curvy core that is perfectly
    supported and depending upon the binder ready to be baked or cured as required.

    Fortunately for us my foundry guy says he can cure the cores in the boxes saving us the extra work
    but its a neat trick to know.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails p1.jpg   p2.jpg   p6.jpg   p7.jpg   curvey-cores.jpg  

    Last edited by Terry Harper; 07-18-2018 at 09:04 AM.


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