Big, Big Wisconsin T-Head engine - Page 19
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 19 of 19 FirstFirst ... 9171819
Results 361 to 373 of 373
  1. #361
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    L'Orignal, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    2,074
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1702
    Likes (Received)
    829

    Default

    Thanks Terry ,
    I Will post some more about the The Vimy Foundation and the World Remembers in another thread.
    This 30 minute video goes into some detail about them here .
    World War One: A Century On | TVO.org
    Not all TV network videos will play every where on line so I hope this one does.
    As a side note some may recognise one of the guests on the program R.H.Thomson as the actor who in 1979 played Thatcher in the video an “American Christmas Carol”
    The subject of this thread by Joe in NH
    "An American Christmas Carol" with Henry Winkler

    No doubt Remembrance Day is perhaps more on the the minds of Nova Scotians since WW1 had a major impact on Halifax and that province .
    This video from 2017 explains more about the Halifax Explosion that may not be as well known outside of Canada .
    Halifax Explosion: 100 years later
    Halifax Explosion: 1 years later - YouTube

    The title of Peter Jackson’s film is no doubt inspired by the lines of the poem that form the Act of Remembrance that is read usually by a veteran at the Nov. 11th ceremonies in Canada and other Commonwealth countries.
    “They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
    Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
    At the going down of the sun and in the morning
    We will remember them.”
    Remembrance Day
    The complete poem can be seen here.
    For the Fallen Poem by Laurence Binyon
    The film was available on line on the BBC site but may be available on line for a fee on some other sites by now.
    https://www.radiotimes.com/news/on-d...r-documentary/
    Regards,
    Jim

  2. Likes Terry Harper liked this post
  3. #362
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Maine USA
    Posts
    377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    Last night we had one of those wonderful northern Maine nights when the temp
    dropped to -20 degrees. Why did I move back here? (LOL)They funny part is
    we were out hunting coyotes in that cold! But... then again a few nights ago
    I started the Land Rover up and forgot about it... until I went to start the car
    the following morning and... found the Land Rover still running.

    Anyway, the other day I finished 3D printing the last of the lower water
    manifold patterns. Its had to believe that I have created THE last pattern
    I will need on this project and now have the ability to cast all the remaining
    missing bits and pieces. Once I get it all finished-up and painted I am thinking
    of gathering all the patterns together for a group photo just
    as a reference for how much work has been spent on patterns.

    The other day I received one of those wonderful packages in the mail
    that can super heat even a polar bear paradise. Opening it I found
    four wonderful, amazing original primer cups as supplied by Wisconsin
    back in the day and are correct for my motor.

    img_1630.jpg

    They came via a collector restoring a 1917 FWD truck which used a
    Wisconsin T-head and were surplus to his needs. They will need some
    TLC and some fabrication of missing bits but it sure beats having to
    fabricate a complete set of six!

    Originally these had either bakelite or wood handles. Now I just need
    to find or fabricate two more! Thanks Bob!

    Best regards,

    Terry

  4. #363
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Brunswick Oh USA
    Posts
    4,538
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5071
    Likes (Received)
    2705

    Default

    This spring/summer I'll keep my eyes open. ¼" NPT?

  5. #364
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Maine USA
    Posts
    377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    Thank you so much Ray!

    Yes, 1/4" NPT

    Best regards,

    Terry

  6. #365
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Maine USA
    Posts
    377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    If someone had told back in 2008 that I would still be working on this
    project 11 years later I would have told them they were nuts. But... here we are.

    Today marks a very, very major milestone... I have finished the very last pattern.
    There are no more to be made. They are done. Now its just getting them to the foundry
    to be cast and spending many enjoyable hours transforming rough casting into gleaming
    bronze fittings that are nearly (as humanly possible) identical to the long vanished originals.

    Its kind of a sweet but bitter moment. Sweet in that what was once declared an impossible
    job is now done. The satisfaction that I fabricated these all myself starting with the most basic
    of skills. The knowledge that I started out using a lath and hand tools and ended using
    modern 3D modeling and printing. Bitter, in that the job is now done! However, that's
    tempered by the fact that I have been able to use the skills and knowledge I acquired
    to help others. For example patterns for the valve shrouds for a 1918 FWD truck, parts
    for a 1910 Mitchell automobile and tomorrow, starting the patterns for a bronze sediment
    bowl for another collector.

    I would like to add that I greatly appreciate all the support and encouragement I have
    received over the past years from each and everyone of you. I am also deeply thankful
    for the friendships that this project has forged. Some of you I have had the honor to
    meet in person others only through these pages and via e-mails and phone calls.
    The project to this point has indeed been a community effort.

    So... here are the last of the patterns and core boxes. These are all for the lower
    water manifold including what became known as the "impossible part". Also included is
    the one original fitting that survived the decades.


    img_1660.jpg
    img_1662.jpg
    lower-water-manifold-1.jpg

    Best regards,

    Terry

  7. #366
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Brunswick Oh USA
    Posts
    4,538
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5071
    Likes (Received)
    2705

    Default

    Impressive!

  8. #367
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Vermont
    Posts
    36
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    34
    Likes (Received)
    7

    Default

    Terry ,I also can't believe it's been eleven years.I registered here at practical machinist because of your thread. Thank you for bringing me to such a great community.

    You should be very proud of your accomplishment. Your tenacity with this is a rare thing. Being in the restoration business I can attest to the general waning of enthusiasm that strikes most people about halfway through a project. Great project enthusiasm to be proud of and still much work ahead which I'm sure you'll accomplish.
    Good Luck,
    Dick Sargent

  9. #368
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    936
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    691
    Likes (Received)
    335

    Default

    So I just fell into this thread, got interested in what people would say about cutting a helical gear, and ended up reading the whole thing from end to end. This restoration was described by sealark37 back in 2011 as being beyond a project, past an endeavor, and in fact a quest. That is true but it struck me that it is the perfect sized quest, being a epic effort of CAD, casting, collecting and curating but also not being unmanageable in physical scale. I take my hat of to you, Terry Harper.

  10. #369
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Maine USA
    Posts
    377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    Not a whole lot to report engine wise. Its the end of the school year and its been a bit of
    a time hole. We successfully added another dual enrollment to my course and now
    working to get all setup for the new school year.

    Anyway, I thought I would report some happenings. Awhile ago Herb and I discussed how we need a
    dedicated road to run the Lombard log haulers on. At the moment we have to share space in the
    parking lots which gets interesting when you are driving the 19 ton steamer and meet a
    Prius coming around the corner. The gas Lombard, though far more maneuverable (and it actually
    has brakes) has its own challenge since its nearly impossible to see over the top of the hood
    so any thing on the right side is in a big blind spot!

    Anyway... after tramping around through the woods a bit we decided on a rough route. the next
    job was (and is) convincing and getting people on board. Herb and I agreed that a 14 foot wide travel
    surface was more than adequate and that it should be seeded and grassed - this would (hopefully)
    be more friendly to the tracks and help (somewhat) to reduce wear. We also wanted to hold the
    max. grade to 3%. Our plan is not only to have a safer place to run the beasts but also to
    allow for winter runs with skis and the heavy logging sleds. (vision: horses twitching logs to the
    rollways, Lombards hauling sleds heavily laden with logs to the mill yard, damp wool clothing, hot tea and
    fresh donuts, crosscut saws, axes and peavey's and a lot of fun)


    To help spread the said vision I used Autodesk InfraWorks to develop a 3D flyover that featured the proposed
    Lombard road and a number of capital improvements to the museum grounds.

    Here is the link to the video:

    YouTube



    As you will notice at the end we zoom into a weather vane shaped like a Lombard Log Hauler perched on top
    of Machinery Hall. It wasn't long before I was contacted by Chris Rueby. Shortly after sending Chris the
    CAD files the museum received a wonderful package. Yesterday the contents of the said package where
    proudly installed high atop Machinery Hall with the aid of Byron, Jay and Jay's indispensable boom truck:

    dsc_6205.jpg


    As usual things change as they move along... Here is a rendering of the latest rendition of the road:
    img_0001.jpg

    Since the arrival of the Lombard logging sleds back in February we decided we have a need for
    a Sled Pavilion to store them in. Here is the vision in rendered form that I worked up. My students
    tend to be a bit rough with the markers and I am far, far from an artist so please forgive!

    img_0002.jpg

    A couple of years ago, with the invaluable aid of Paul Breton, we salvaged a smokejack that was used
    in a Lombard shed at Fish River Lake. Its a bit worse for wear but all the holes etc. tell a neat story
    and add character. (you can't fake patina like this!) Our plan is to install it in Machinery Hall so we won't have to pull the Steam Lombard out to fire it up. This will make life much easier when we want to do a winter run.

    100_2151.jpg

    and..... the vision......

    epson005.jpg

    Anyway, we have a long ways to go before all this will be done. And there are other projects too,
    such as the new clapboard mill and expanded parking. However, its all one step at a time.

    best regards,

    Terry

  11. #370
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Maine USA
    Posts
    377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    More bling!!

    After having the castings sitting around for what seems like forever, today I decided to mock-up the intake manifold to get the pipe lengths etc. Next step is polishing-up the pipes and solder it all together!

    That little bit of brass has been an adventure. The patterns were some of the first I had ever made. They weren't perfect but they worked wonderful. I was initially worried since the stud locations on the blocks were all over the place - I think they offered-up the intake and match drilled! Anyway, I bored the holes with a bit of extra wiggle room and it all lined-up nicely.

    Its an interesting design since its all built-up at a time when most manifolds were cast as one piece. Originally Wisconsin did offer a one piece manifold but at some point, by the time my motor was built, they had switched to this built-up style. Why would be anyone's guess.

    Anyway What I chose to do was make a exact copy of the original and..... there we have it!

    Best regards,
    Terry


    img_0071.jpg

    img_0069.jpg

    100_3697.jpg

  12. #371
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Smithfield, Rhode Island
    Posts
    1,081
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    109
    Likes (Received)
    517

    Default

    If I had to guess, I'd say that a one piece cast manifold like that was just too complicated and they lost too many in finishing. A lot of small production, high quality cars had built-up manifolds. RR used them on the Silver Ghost (discontinued 1925 in England and 1926 in the US). You'd think it was more difficult to do but for low production, high quality it is probably the easiest and best option.

  13. Likes Matt_Maguire liked this post
  14. #372
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Maine USA
    Posts
    377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    Yesterday marked a major milestone in this long, long but fun project. The intake manifold is DONE!

    From the start of the project I knew replicating the intake manifold would be one of the most challenging parts of the project and was in fact one of the first items I focused on. My thought being if I could successfully tackle this than everything else would be fairly easy.

    It has also set the criteria for the entire project. Whether for better or for worse I would work to replicate the original parts as accurately as possible even though the chances of someone knowing the difference would be remote at best and that a much simpler solution would probably function just as well.

    So... here we are with a new intake manifold (part No. A34A) that I think is fairly close to the original.
    Next step is to polish it up and move on to the lower water manifold! There are a few tasks in regards to the
    fuel supply I need to finish including re-building the governor valve body (it went through a fire and the valve shaft is stuck solid!) and I am waiting for delivery of the re-build kit for the big Stromberg M4 which I ordered through Stan Howe and I need to bore and bush the hole for the throttle shaft.

    The bright spots are from cleaning up excess solder. I have included a photo of the OEM manifold on Don's engine for reference.

    Best regards,

    Terry


    img_0097.jpg

    img_0094.jpg

    100_0028b.jpg

  15. #373
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Maine USA
    Posts
    377
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    792

    Default

    Looking at the photo of my daughter holding the new manifold it dawned on me how much
    time has passed and how things have changed since this project started way back in November of 2008.

    At that time she was my little 6 year old girl now she is a Senior in High School.
    I am not sure how I feel about that!

    abby-then-now.jpg


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •