Big, Big Wisconsin T-Head engine - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    After hunting high and low I finally have new valves on hand....well not quite.

    The closest I could get were oversize valves for a G.E. diesel locomotive. I will have to turn them to size but the price was right....10 bucks each



    Here is a photo of the old valves. All but two were bent and damaged so bad that I had to cut them to get them out. And those two were so worn they are beyond salvage.


  2. #22
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    Well its been awhile since I posted an update. Progress has been made but it is slow going. First item of business was getting the new (old) lathe setup. I purchased a 13"x5' South Bend vintage 1943.

    Now that its anchored down, in trim and the motor swapped out the old girl is doing sterling service. Now if only I was half as good as an operator! The learning curve has been steep.

    The first item I had to fabricate was a new center for a worn-out stud gear. Now the power feed works very nice.

    Now onto the engine..... Iam making progress on the valves. They are bi-alloy stainless valve. The heads are some tough!! Using carbide about .005" is all I can take. I decided not to turn the stems. They are .557" where as the originals where .50" I will have to ream the new valve guides but they have plenty of material. I did, however, turn the stems to .50" felow the keeper slots.


    In addition to the valves I have worked on more of the patterns and core boxes - this one is for a tee on the intake manifold.

    https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-V...0/100_2690.JPG

    I also tackled the water pump. Thats the beuty of this project - there is so much to do if you get stuck or bored there is plenty else to do. I found a intact pump body to replace my broken one as well as a new bronze impeller. (Thanks Don!) The cover plate was very badly pitted so I faced it. Unfortunalty the raised boss that acts as the thrust bearing for the impeller still has some deep pits. I will need to fill these.

    https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-z...0/100_2769.JPG

    Bored with all that I decided to make something pretty that has no bearing on how well the engine will run - I made a new tag for it. The original had disapeared a long, long time ago but I did have access to an original. (Thanks Don! - again). In addition the serial number is stamped into the top of the block so I was able to create the tag with the proper information. Not bad for a first timer

    https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-P...0/100_2807.JPG

    Then - for inspiration I took a trip to Don's. Hearing the noise of that big Wisconsin in his Lombard Log hauler was worth the trip!

    Unfortunatly the clutch was sticking. Earlier, before Don could shut it down, he pushed the back wall of his shed out 5 feet.

    ‪100 2700‬‏ - YouTube

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  4. #23
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    Terry,
    Wow, glad to see you're making progress. Some throw in the towel when the going gets tough. Then again, you must be afflicted with "old iron disease". You do know, there is no cure.
    I know it's still a ways off before you need sparkplugs, but check the size. I've collected old and odd plugs for years. If I've got a set, I'll gladly donate a set of "period correct" jobs for the cause.

  5. #24
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    Wow!! Thanks Ray!

    Here is the only original plug that survived intact - its a Champion but there is no number on it. The threads are 7/8"

    Again, Thanks for the offer Ray!



    I belive I mentioned awhile back that the crankcase was a 500 lb. bronze casting. Here is a photo of it all cleaned-up



    I forgot to mention we had to move a 2000 lb safe to make room in the shop for the lathe. Yes my wife thinks Iam a bit off-center.


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    Do you know for sure that the new valves are not sodium filled? You don't want to cut into the sodium when you do your mods.

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Do you know for sure that the new valves are not sodium filled? You don't want to cut into the sodium when you do your mods.
    It's worth checking. Even though a diesel would rarely benefit from them, and they don't have the "mushroom " look of the aircraft valves I've dealt with, it would be cheap insurance.
    Curious, what model locomotive do they fit?

  8. #27
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    They are solid forged alloy. I sourced them direct from the manufacturer Carl M. Cummings Machine in Calif. They were very helpful

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    Terry,

    Thanks for the updates, good progress! The name tags are excellent! The bronze crankcase is very interesting, any comments from readers on why this was used?

    Could it be that when weight (or cost!) was not that important, would bronze offer easier and more detailed casting than cast iron, perhaps greater strength per weight than cast iron? I suppose "bronze" is a broad description, there are many alloys. My old Barnes drill press has an impressive long bronze clutch lever which I doubt would have survived 67 years in iron form.

  10. #29
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    Hello Peter,

    Its Manganese Bronze alloy. Bronze alloy crankcases were used in a number of high-end engines and cars - Van-Blerck, Locomobile, Sterling come to mind.

    Manganese Bronze Alloy offered much greater tensil strength over cast iron. Locomobile stated 80,000 lbs per sq. inch. This was important with the T-head engines which lack the rigidity of a mono-block (cylinders & crankcase cast as a unit) In fact Wisconsin described it as "Very Rigid" in the sales material.

    In addition this engine was designed for marine use as well. In fact all the piping, intake manifold etc. are bronze alloy which made it a prime target for scavengers over the years.

  11. #30
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    Terry,
    Haven't heard the name Van-Blerck in a while. My brother has a brochure on a Van-Blerck marine engine. We used to have a WSM on our sawmill. Used to be a lot of engine mfgs. out there!

  12. #31
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    Hello Ray,

    Van-Blerck is indeed an obscure name. But what an engine! Lombard used a variety of engines in his tractors including Van-Blerck. In fact the gentleman I aquired my engine from had a big T-head Van-Blerck he took out of a wollen mill. He was going to power a Lombard with it but found a running Wisconsin instead. I beleive it ended-up in a boat.

    Lombard also used Brennan, Sterling F series (I know of only 1 in existence)
    Stearns, Waukesau and Hercules.

    For awhile he built his own engines from 1912-16 (which is amazing considering Lombards limited production) He produced both a 6 cylinder and a 4 cylinder. There is one six cylinder that exists in very rough condition. If you look closely you can see the various homemade brackets etc. holding it together.



    Here is a big Sterling model F

  13. #32
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    Recieved a care package in the mail today. Ray Behner a member of this forum with a self-professed soft spot for old iron donated two sets of vintage spark plugs!

    Six are Rentz. The othe six are Firestone Panlonium (radioactive) I guess I wont be carrying those around in my pockets!

    They say the difference between a restoration and a great restoration is in the details. Well this is one of those details that will make this engine standout.

    Thanks Ray!!



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    Following this with great interest! Keep up the great work and take pics of everything of course

  16. #34
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    Here are the finished tags. They came out OK but not as well as I would like. Etching it a bit deeper would have helped. May do another one at a later date.

    The "1145" is for my engine. The "1143" I plan to donate to the State Museum for thier tractor. I also did blanks for Don and myself.


  17. #35
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    Bit of info about the Polonium plugs: Radioactive Spark Plugs (ca. 1940s)

  18. #36
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    Thumbs up This is just...

    This is just drippin' cool!

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  20. #37
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    And.... of course I had to make a Lombard patent plate to go with the new engine plate.


  21. #38
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    Luckly when I got this big beast Don gave me a complete set of 12 roller tappets and tappet guides.

    The roller tappets are approx. 5-1/2" long and 1" in diameter. They run in phospher bronze guides. All the original guides had disapeared many, many years ago - thats why the valves were all bent - so they could get that shiney metal

    Two of the roller tappets Don gave me were way past thier goodness date (i.e. badly corroded or bent in one case).

    My friend Gene Bibber - a retired tool & die machinist, made replacements for me which I picked-up yesterday.

    Here they are alongside an original and one of the guides. They just need some polishing and the pins pressed in.

    These are a simple looking part but there is a heck of a lot of time into making these. They are bored all the way through, the top is dished and an oil return hole drilled at an angle to the center bore. They had to be heat treated as well.

    Thanks Gene!


  22. #39
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    "The assembly line was a long wooden bench... An expert Fitter, a kind of man who has almost disapeared from our world, worked on each chassis..." The aurthor was refering to the long defunct Smith & Marbley Simplex Automobile plant on East 83rd Street in New York. But he could have been refering to a variety of plants - Locomobile, Lozier, Peerless etc.

    Now I appreciate what a "Fitter" was and did! Today I fitted the tappet guides to the crankcase. This engine is a fine example of the fitters art. Each piece was hand fit so no two pieces are identical. In 1925, when this engine was assembled, very few manufactures still relied on this exacting art. Mass assembly with dozens of hands pawing over an engine for mere seconds at a time at each stage of assembly was the rule of the day.

    Since the tappet guides came from several diffrent engines each one had to be painstakingly fitted to the crankcase. It took over four hours of working with bluing, emery cloth and a fine mill file to get each one to fit correctly.

    This was one of those time consuming fiddly jobs that you don't look forward to doing but then find out that it was very satisfying, relaxing and rewarding.


  23. #40
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    For todays adventure..... I faced some 3/8"x24 grade 8 bolts for the adjusters on the tappets.

    I also started tapping out new gaskets for the tappet guides. This is tedious work with a small ballpeen hammer and a brass punch. Calling the factory for a gasket set is not an option!

    Many of the gaskets, such as those under the cylinders, were shellacked paper. I plan to do the same.




    The old adjuster bolts were bent, cracked, well used and abused.



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