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  1. #41
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    For Today's adventure..... I turned a new water pump shaft. Here is a photo of it with the couplings and bronze empeller temporarily in place. I still need to cut the woodruff keys and drill it for the retaining pins. Next is the babbett bearings in the water pump housing.



    In a continuation of my etching frenzy (OCD)..... I etched a moto-meter face. This is an exact copy of an original that is on the Lombard in the Maine State Museum. Its one of only two that I know exist.


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    What's the OD of that MotoMeter face? I imagine it's a large one on that machine.

    Very cool

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    Terry,
    Looks darn good! I used to do that for antique engines and magnetos. My friend is an artist and silk screen guy. He'd do the artwork and burn the screen. Then apply etch-resist to the brass. All I'd do was put it into some etchant from Radio Shack. Really came out nice. What was that stuff. Ferric chloride? No, maybe not.

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    Mud,

    Its 2-3/4". It fits a senior Boyce Moto-meter. Boyce offered what it called a truck/tractor moto-meter. The only diffrence being no bezel or glass. The face plate was exposed. They usually had fine brass screen in the hole to protect the thermometer.


    Ray: Yes, its ferric acid. I generate all the artwork in the computer than its printed on a special mylar and heat transfered to the brass. Works real slick!

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    WOW! Wonderful.

    Paul

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    Well thinks have been moving along....

    With the valves and tappets done it was time to re-visit the new valve guides. I had hoped to find original spec valves with a .50" stem. That didn't happen and I ended-up with valves with a .557" stem.

    So it was back to the lathe for a quick trim in length to clear the bigger flare of the head and another boring and reaming session - this time to .559"




    I got tired of looking at the beat-up valve port plugs so those took a ride in the lathe as well. These weight about 2 lbs apiece. There was no way I could remove all of the blemishes and damage nor do I want too. They each tell a tale - some know others not known. In this case it was the need to perform countless valve jobs due to the poor fuel of the era. Sometimes that meant using a chisle to get a suck valve port plug to loosen!!

    It doesnt show-up well in the photo but as originally machined a light trace of tool marks was visible. I wanted to duplicated that rather than going for the mirror smooth look. Next is cleaning-up the steel center plugs and turning two new ones.


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    You're well beyond the "labor or love" status. More like "infatuation." Possibly even "possession."

    I bet at night you dream about the old girl, don't you?

    Becoming one with the machine is never easy.

    Joe

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  9. #48
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    Funny...my wife said the same thing to me the other day!! (LOL)

    Actually Joe it all comes down to someone telling me it couldn't be done....Last time someone said that to me I ended up
    in the woods jacking two locomotives out of the mud! I guess I need to stop taking offense to that.....




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  11. #49
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    Well now that you have let your secret out of the bag Terry, I am telling you that you couldnt fix the financial mess we are in...There now I have done it. I am sure the fix is on its way, thanks Terry.

    That Loco move looks like it was a lot of fun...especially with that nice hard packed roadbed to work on.

    Good luck with your rebuild and please continue to keep us informed.

    Charles

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    Heck with a "nurse" (that pretty woman in uniform who brings pills to those with a metalworking planer.) A locomotive merits an entire medical team who dispenses "emergency shock therapy" to the entire family of a locomotive owner.

    You may be among the fortunate. There is a step beyond. I don't think there is help for anyone who brings home an Atlas Booster Rocket.

    Joe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Harper View Post
    Funny...my wife said the same thing to me the other day!! (LOL) Actually Joe it all comes down to someone telling me it couldn't be done....Last time someone said that to me I ended up
    in the woods jacking two locomotives out of the mud! I guess I need to stop taking offense to that.....
    Wow that's something you don't see every day. Are there a lot of abandonded locomotives in the Maine back woods?
    I've been quietly following your old engine restoration. You're very detail oriented and meticulous. I can't tell you how much I enjoy watching the progress on your project. Keep up the posts. You're doing God's work!
    toolles

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    Are there a lot of abandonded locomotives in the Maine back woods?
    Only two that I know of.... We actually stabilizied two locomotives. The stable mate to the 186,000 lb. 2-8-0 is a 144,000 lb 4-6-0.



    These were used in the Eagle Lake & West Branch railroad a private logging railroad which ran from 1927-1933. (Another passion) They can only be reached by a hike through the woods or by boat.

    Since 1969 they have been owned by the state of Maine - which, as concientious owners concerned for the preservation of history....promply burned them and the shed they were housed in.

    You're very detail oriented and meticulous.
    Thats my type AAAA++++ OCD thing. You don't know the half of it! For instance, its not enough to just make a part, that type AAAA++ thing plus decades spent in engineering and design means I have to create a full set of working drawings - cross referenced to a 1926 Lombard parts catalog of course!





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    Ahh. There's NOTHING quite as nice as a good night's sleep.

    Sleep, perchance to dream.

    Been there done that.

    You definitely get "the knack" though.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlJsPa6UwcM

    "Will it go away?"

    "No he'll grow up to rescue all kinds of historic machinery found in the woods."
    Joe

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    "Will it go away?"

    "No he'll grow up to rescue all kinds of historic machinery found in the woods."

    Joe
    Isn't that the truth!! here is the next piece I am attempting to rescue. As usual It's not as straight forward as it seems.....it and the DC generator it was belted to plus some other goodies have to be dragged over a mile through the woods by hand. Yeah...someone already told me it wasn't possible.....


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    Just gotta say, Very impressed that you're recasting parts. In this day and age, I think it's too common for people to machine a replacement out of solid stock and end up with something that just dosn't fit with the rest of the machine.
    Keep it up!

  19. #56
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    Um. Looks like a Paine engine.

    Inverted crosshead. Sort of "flower vase" base.

    Very desirable among the steam boat set, especially in the smaller sizes.

    This must be found in WESTERN MAINE. All the good stuff is found "out west" nowadays.

    Joe

  20. #57
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    Todays task.... was cleaning-up the valve shrouds. Most T-head engines have exposed valve stems, springs etc. There were no provisions for lubrication of the valve stems and guides. This was true of many of the early Wisconsin designs as well.

    However, for the PT series, rudimentary lubrication of the valve stems and guides is provided by a fine oil mist forced by crankcase pressure through oil ways drilled through the top of the roller tappets. The valve shrouds are intended to contain it.

    My engine was missing all the shrouds (there's a big surprise!) However, many years ago Don - the gentleman I aquired my engine from, had a pattern and core box made and a set cast.

    My task over the past few days was to machine the seats that recieve the valve guide bosses and the tappet guides and a general clean-up of the outside.

    Unfortunatly the pattern was made of mahogany with un-filled grain so all the castings had a wonderful wood grain texture which had to be polished out. (Another good use for the lathe) Iam also missing two shrouds so I will have to have those cast.


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  22. #58
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    Well it’s a rainy autumn day here in Maine. It’s the time of
    year when we think about apple picking, a steaming mug of
    cider and watch the leaves change as the days shorten and
    nights grow longer and crisper.

    Today, while checking my Private messages – which I haven’t
    done for awhile, I found a message from a fellow forum member.
    He mentioned how his mother who grew-up in Northern Maine
    use to hitch rides on Lombard tractors. This brought to mind a
    neat story about Ovide and Arthur who also hitched a ride
    on a Lombard many years ago.


    In 1930, the bottom fell out of the paper market, pulpwood
    contracts, were hard to come by. Subsequently with a surplus
    of labor wages fell sharply. It was not unusual to find men
    willing to work hiking many miles into the Maine woods to
    remote lumber camps to seek work. Many did not find it. For them
    the long trudge through the snow was a last ditch, heart
    breaking effort. Others lucked out and found work for the winter.

    Ovide and Arthur were lucky. In Late 1932 Arthur convinced
    Ovide - who had just lost his job with the local street railway,
    that they should go to Churchill Lake to work for Edouard Lacroix
    for the remainder of the winter. You can image their disappointment
    after traveling all the way from Waterville only to find out
    that there was no work. However cranking-up the phone system
    a foreman found out that Robinson’s camp near Chesuncook
    needed men to cut and pile pulpwood onto sleds for the princely
    sum of $2.00 per cord. With no other options available, Ovide
    and Arthur started out on the 30 mile snowshoe trek
    to Robinson’s camp.

    Now the Chesuncook region can be cold and snowy but that
    February it was one of the worst on record. By February 25th
    the snow was hip deep and the horses and men were floundering
    but the work went ahead. The next day Robinson decided to
    close the camp. Desiring to move his men to Patten he hired
    a Lombard to break out the 32 miles of tote road to the
    Eastern Manufacturing Co’s Trout Brook Farm
    (now a campsite in Baxter Sate Park) From the farm,
    the Eastern maintained a 30 mile plowed road to Patten.

    With limited room on the back deck of the Lombard,
    the men tossed coins to see who would go. Ovide and
    Arthur were among the lucky ten men who would share
    the small platform with several drums of gasoline.
    Huddled under old horse blankets and with two months
    worth of wages ($100.00) in their pockets they started out.
    They were going to town.

    As the tractor muscled it’s way through the deep drifts,
    a cloud of snow thrown-up by the lags enveloped the men
    while cascades of snow knocked off the overhanging trees
    by the sharp blast of the exhaust inundated them from above. Nausea
    from the gasolinefumes seeping from the fuel drums
    added to their misery.

    Every couple of hours or so the driver would stop and
    grease around giving the men a chance to stretch their
    cramped limbs and light-up at a respectful distance.
    Six hours later Ovid and Arthur, numb from the cold,
    sick from fumes and with ears ringing from the un-muffled
    machinegun like exhaust climbed off at Trout Brook Farm.

    In Patten they caught a train for Bangor. Ovide quickly
    parted with some of his cash by buying some bootleg liquor.
    Apparently for the rest of his life Ovid loathed picking up
    a saw or axe to make firewood.

    Arthur ended up at a Bangor hotel and quickly
    settled into a drunken state and was broke within 24 hours.


    Last edited by Terry Harper; 09-24-2011 at 06:46 AM.

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  24. #59
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    Terry,I've been following this thread, esp. righting of the 2 locos stuck in the mud. You obviously understand how it was done back then. It wasn't done by the time clock, it was done by the job. You just went to work and worked on it until it was done. It's amazing what you can do with some 20 ton jacks and a pile of wood.
    I like your engine rebuild too.
    Max

  25. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Harper View Post
    Iam also missing two shrouds so I will have to have those cast.
    Terry,

    It might be easier to make two from solid? Just an idea...


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