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  1. #161
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    Terry,

    If I may inject a note of humor, it's time to give that picnic table another coat of stain ! As the project progresses, the table has less-and-less finish, as it weathers. Now, it has snow on it !

    I've said this before and I will say it again: Your patternmaking skills are impressive.

    John Ruth

  2. #162
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    Hello Folks,

    Just wanted to invite you all to the Owls Head Transportation Museum on January 12th for a presentation of “From Nowhere to Nowhere “.
    Centered on the history and operation of the Eagle Lake & West Branch Railroad, "From Nowhere to Nowhere” tells the story of the early mechanization
    of Maine’s North woods during the first three decades of the last century – an era when steam and steel replace horse and brute manpower in the remote logging camps of the Allagash -
    when Lombards, Locomotives, steam boats and a Tramway ruled the forest.

    Drawing on over 30 years research, with numerous, never seen before Images Interwoven with history, personal stories and anecdotes of those who lived,
    worked and raised families in this remote region, “From Nowhere to No Where” tells the vivid story of life in Maine’s Allagash Wilderness during the 1900-1933 period
    as well as the efforts to document, and preserve this remarkable slice of Maine history.

    The presentation begins at 1:00 pm and admission is free.

    More info on up-coming programs here:
    Transportation Museum launches Winter Education Series — Events — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

    If you have never had a chance to visit the museum I urge you to take the opertunity the view this wonderful collection.

    Hope to see you there!

    Best regards,

    Terry Harper



  3. #163
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    Terry,
    Thanks for the invite,but I'm not going to be able to make it! I know I'd enjoy it immensely and that you've probably done a tremendous amount of work on this project. If you have put any where near the dedication into this project that you are putting into the rebuild of your Lombard I'm sure I'll regret not being there.

  4. #164
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    Terry,

    I hope that some arrangement has been made to video tape this !!! In fact, I hope the museum is videotaping ALL the events in this series.

    Steam Locomotives, Steam and Internal Combustion Lombards, a cable-drawn Tramway......what more could one ask for?

    If the museum itself does not want to tape this, perhaps a local "public access cable channel" can be persuaded to do so.

    I'd love to attend but it is too far for a weekend trip.

    John Ruth

  5. #165
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    Thanks for the kind words guys. Most appreciated! If you have never been to the Owls Head Transportation Museum I strongly urge you to do so. Its an amazing collection of engines, horse drawn equipment, automobiles and aircraft.
    If you do make up this way sometime be sure to walk through the hanger and the the restoration shop- they have a whole bunch of stuff going on in there including construction of a Hisso powered S.E. 5a fighter.Last time I was there I tried to convince them to throw a Liberty V12 in the back of the truck but they wouldn't!

  6. #166
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    Thanks to all who attended the lecture. We had 162 people in attendence which placed it as one of the best attended lectures since the museum begain the Winter lecture series 14 years ago.
    Again thanks to all who attended. It was a great experience and I got to put some faces to some names. Special thanks to the Owls Head Transportation museum for thier hard work and
    sponsering such a wonderful series.

  7. #167
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    Terry
    Stop messing about and get on with that big engine!



    I'm only joking - all the best!

    Steve

  8. #168
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    Well... Iam not dead yet. Just been working on a major life change. Seems that since the consulting business is all but dead I have been seeking another career.

    All I can say is...My what a long strange trip its been! In 1980 I walked into a high school classroom and took my place at a drafting board. (no CAD back then!) I knew in a very short time that that is what I wanted to do and in fact did for over thirty years. Over time I learned and matured professionally to eventually owning a consulting firm providing CAD services to the heavy construction industry. We worked on some amazingly huge and neat projects: Boston's Big Dig (no we did not work on the parts that keep falling down), Croton Water Treatment facility, Port of Miami Tunnel, countless houses, commercial properties, hydro electric facilites and lowly landfills.

    This past Monday I began my new career.... in the very same classroom I began my journey in so long ago... only this time I took my seat at the teachers desk.

    Needless to say the engine project is on hold for a bit as we pack the shop and house up and relocate to a small town in God's Country.

    Best regards,

    Terry

  9. #169
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    The teachers community just gained a valuable new member. Good luck!

    Walt

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    Those kids are lucky to have you ! Bill

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  13. #171
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    So.. with the shop and house in the process of being packed-up for the move I have had to find other ways to work on the big engine.
    Yesterday one of my students took the valves springs and valve spring seats over to the Farm Mechanics shop and media blasted them for me. It was a little job but it felt good to at least get something done.

    Meanwhile I have been playing with AutoCAD Inventor. Amazing program! Just for kicks (and because I had 2D drawings for the parts) I modeled some pieces and made a couple of assemblies. Hopefully, when we take a field trip to the local community college we can watch some of the parts printed out in small scale on thier 3D printer or better yet follow one of the simple pieces through the CNC machines.

    Below is a sample:

    Here is the intake manifold assembly - I have all the castings just waiting to get to the machining.




    And a lifter. I have a complete set but I wanted to see if I could model it.


    Below is the oil level gauge.


    If we it takes too much longer I may have time to model the whole thing!

    Best regards,

    Terry

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  15. #172
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    Terry! Hi! I'm very interested in your thread/post here! Where about in Maine are you from, live, etc. You can PM if that's better, my family has 5 running gas jobs, which I think one of them may have been in one of your photos back at the beginning, a picture of a sterling engine. I was reading through your list of surviving lombards, and says there were 10 of model such and such up at Church hill, have you been there yet since the 70's? I read that list and had an immediate interest in going there, ha! Anyway, I got very excited in reading this post after realizing there's more of them than I thought left out there.

  16. #173
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    So.... after a long silence its time for an up-date. Saturday the big engine went on a 5-1/2 hour ride to our new home.
    Needless to say this required the help of a few friends. (and the Mormon Missionaries - Ask the Missionaries.. they can help!)









    Earlier when I picked-up the trailer we noticed the Rover had a sticky brake pad. (is anything really ever right with a Rover?) I had kind of forgot about it. When I saw my brother heading toward the truck - which at this point was hitched-up to a extremly overloaded trailer - with a few tools in his hand I asked him what he was up too. "A brake job" he replied. And...that's exactly what he did - without removing the wheels!

    Of course everybody was pleased that we got the engine and the crates of parts loaded......than they realized we still had to load the lathe.......



    After a long, long drive to God's Country or ..."The County" as we call Aroostook County here in Maine. All (including the lathe) was secured in the new home. And yes.... in keeping with the potato growing heritage of "The County" the new home is a converted potato house.

  17. #174
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    While waiting to setup shop at the new house (which we are currently waiting to close on) I have been working
    on a few items.

    One item that's perplexed me are the primer cups - I simply cannot find any that look right. After seeing a bloke in England
    fabricate a set for a WW1 vintage Thornycroft lorry I decided that I might have to give it a try as well (once the shop is re-established)

    Now that I am living over 5 hours away from the only complete and running Wisconsin PT I had to convince Don to take some measurements for me. Not only did he provide the measurements he even removed one of the original primer cups from his engine so his wife could photograph it for me.

    Anyway, with measurements and a photo in hand I set to work developing a 3D model and 2D drawing to work from. I still find it a bit odd that you create the 2D drawings after creating the model - this to me is like building an airplane than developing the drawings! Things sure have changed since I first set lead holder to paper over 30 years ago.

    Here is the original. The levers had neat wooden grips on them but over the years they cracked and fell off.



    Here is the model with all the pieces assembled including the steel primer cup stud - which I had fabricated earlier and are tucked away waiting for installation. I still have some tweeking to do but its almost there.



    Hopefully next month we will be settled in the new house and my shop area will be up and running.

    Best regards,

    Terry

    Hopefully soon I will be able to get the chips flying again and fabricate this little beauties.

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  19. #175
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    Oh my aching back! Well, its not all that bad... Today we moved the big Wisconsin engine and all its parts (all packed away in crates) and the South Bend to our new home just a stones throw from the Canadian border. After working the South bend into the basement shop area even I have to admit that I am not looking forward to ever having to move it again!

    While the church/potato house/apartment we were renting worked out ok we couldn't pass on the chance to purchase a nice house which would allow us to be mortgage free - well not quite mortgage free but I can tell you that the taxes and homeowners are more per month than our mortgage. Big grin there!

    Anyway, now all I need to do is setup the shop area and I will be back to work on this project.



    Of course it all hasn't been work - here in the "Country" (Aroostook County for you folks from away) its harvest time which means potato's which means spending a late afternoon foraging the harvested fields for a winter store of spuds.



    "The County" isn't all potato fields - in fact its a bit schizophrenic. Here is a view the other part of the "County" which happens to be pretty near where the Lombard that once used my engine resided.



    Best regards,

    Terry

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  21. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Harper View Post
    Oh my aching back! Well, its not all that bad... Today we moved the big Wisconsin engine and all its parts (all packed away in crates) and the South Bend to our new home just a stones throw from the Canadian border. After working the South bend into the basement shop area even I have to admit that I am not looking forward to ever having to move it again!

    While the church/potato house/apartment we were renting worked out ok we couldn't pass on the chance to purchase a nice house which would allow us to be mortgage free - well not quite mortgage free but I can tell you that the taxes and homeowners are more per month than our mortgage. Big grin there!

    Anyway, now all I need to do is setup the shop area and I will be back to work on this project.



    Of course it all hasn't been work - here in the "Country" (Aroostook County for you folks from away) its harvest time which means potato's which means spending a late afternoon foraging the harvested fields for a winter store of spuds.



    "The County" isn't all potato fields - in fact its a bit schizophrenic. Here is a view the other part of the "County" which happens to be pretty near where the Lombard that once used my engine resided.



    Best regards,

    Terry
    I love this project! I await each update . It shows what we can do to preserve some of our industrial history. Thank you for the effort and expense that you apply to this project. I hope it inspires others to do something similar.

  22. #177
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  24. #178
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    Now that's my kind of Christmas card!

  25. #179
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    Well time for an update: While the shop space is slowly getting put into shape (new benches, electrical etc.) the cylinder blocks have been at the schools Farm Mechanic's shop having the old exhaust and intake manifold studs removed. It’s been a great lesson in patience for the students and they have pretty much mastered the "weld a nut on the broken stud method". They managed to remove all but one intake stud which will have to be drilled out.

    Next - they will clean the blocks and paint them.

    On another note I found this interesting tidbit. It seems that in 1920 the City of New York purchased a used Lombard tractor for their municipal works. In answer to their ad they found and purchased a used 100 hp 10 ton Lombard from Mr. Charles H. Peckworth for the sum of $6,950.00. Shortly thereafter the city comptroller (bean counter) figured out that the tractor had not been purchased via a competitive bid. Claiming that the price was inflated, he refused to pay the complete balance. Needless to say Mr. Peckworth (the seller) was not amused and promptly filed a legal challenge and the battle was on.

    Anyway, this swirl of paper, accusations, and lawyer bills centered around one 10 ton Lombard tractor (s/n 160). In August 1918 Mr. Charles H. Peckworth purchased the tractor from the Manhattan Motor Company for $9,470.00 and then rented it to the U.S. Army for use at Camp Upton and Camp Mills for $50.00 per day plus costs. following which it was returned to Mr. Peckworth who then performed an extensive overhaul of the tractor to the tune of $1,794.10. Under cross examination Mr. Peckworth stated that the labor cost was inflated due to war time labor rates. It was also revealed that he had been reimbursed 100% for the cost of the repairs as stipulated by his rental agreement with the Army. He also stated that the heavy repairs were required due to the tractor being operated nearly "around the clock" in a sand pit without proper lubrication and care.

    After the sale to the City of New York it was delivered to Asphalt Plant No. 3 in Glendale, Long Island as requested by the City of New York and put to good use. In fact one witness testified proudly how it was the largest tractor in New York! Though another witness for the defendant tried to down-play this by claiming the tractor was un-satisfactory because the lags "marred" the asphalt. (LOL!)


    Below is plaintiff Exhibit 1 (the Lombard in question)




    Plaintiff Exhibit No. 2 (The City's solicitation)


    Plaintiff Exhibit No. 3 (The repair bill)



    According to the records the jury started deliberations at 12:17 p.m. and returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiff (Mr. Peckworth) at 12:37 p.m.
    with a verdict of $7,488.83 (purchase price plus interest) owed to Mr. Peckworth.

    While I am sure this experience was very stressful for Mr. Peckworth, from the perspective of a historian his tribulation has provided a wealth of information. For instance we know for beyond doubt, thanks to testimony of a former Lombard employee, that Lombard tractors were in fact assembled at the Elizabeth, N.J. facility run by James Barron.

    Unfortunately S/N 164 does not appear in the surviving records though interestingly there is a record of a tractor No. 2043 which was sold by James Barron Corp. to the Camp Upton Quartermaster on August 19, 1918. For a number of years Barron was a exporter and sales agent for Lombard and shipped tractors to such places as the Dutch East Indies, Guatemala and Russia.

    Interestingly during the trial the defendant (City of New York) tried to claim that the tractor wasn't suitable for the type of work the required of it. By 1927 Lombard was catering to the municipal and construction market with the model CS-88. This was powered by a huge Climax Engineering 4 cylinder engine (6"x7") and rated for tons with special order versions rated at 20.

    Unfortunately for Lombard they were late comers to a market which was rapidly embracing holt type tractors and rubber tired trucks.






    Best regards,

    Terry

  26. #180
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    Great post , thanks


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