Bringin' Home A Springfield 16" Lathe - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    It has these slotted levelling bolts and lock collars, though it is missing 2 of each. One bolt was replaced with this hex head. I'm thinking of replacing them all with an alloy socket set screw (cup tip) / trimmed (thinned) hex nut combination. I like Doc's idea of a 1/2" bolt (rounded beveled head) stuck in the hollow bottom end of the levelling bolt to save the threads, sitting on a 1/2" steel pad. With the cup tip I may go with 1/2" steel balls instead, and those on countersunk, 4" circular, 1/2" thick steel pads. I don't want to worry about aligning rectangular pads perfectly with the lathe bed rails :-)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20170125_122833.jpg   20170125_122848.jpg   20170125_123019.jpg   601__13263.1411576614.175.175.jpg  

  2. #62
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    If I were you, I'd skip the extras. As I understand it, the levelling bolts were generally only hollow so the thing could be bolted to skids in the shipping crate. The factories didn't generally bolt them down, it was more of a matter of levelling them, then grouting under them, if they wanted it to remain firm.

    In the case of my bolts, the extra "bolt head" piece added in was somebody's idea later on, probably to keep the levelling bolts from marring the concrete floor.

    If I were you, I'd just get the big setscrews (something like 1" diameter and 3" long) and let those bear, unmodified, on some mild steel pads. They'll take a bite and form their own "seat".

    I kinda went a little overboard on mine, but I had the materials and the time.

    Doc.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    If I were you, I'd skip the extras. As I understand it, the levelling bolts were generally only hollow so the thing could be bolted to skids in the shipping crate. The factories didn't generally bolt them down, it was more of a matter of levelling them, then grouting under them, if they wanted it to remain firm.

    In the case of my bolts, the extra "bolt head" piece added in was somebody's idea later on, probably to keep the levelling bolts from marring the concrete floor.

    If I were you, I'd just get the big setscrews (something like 1" diameter and 3" long) and let those bear, unmodified, on some mild steel pads. They'll take a bite and form their own "seat".

    I kinda went a little overboard on mine, but I had the materials and the time.

    Doc.
    I hear ya. I got some from a local supplier today at a good price. They only had 2" lengths though, 1/4" shorter than the original. A 1" ball between the cup and the plate will give me all the length I need, and it looks kind of cool (simulated steel plate).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20170125_163657-1-1.jpg  

  4. #64
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    I'm not so sure about the idea of sitting on the ball. While the thing certainly has enough road-hugging weight to keep the balls in place, it strikes me as a bit precarious.

    Really, I don't think you need anything more than just the screws and a flat peice of (relatively thick) mild steel to sit them on.

    Doc.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    I'm not so sure about the idea of sitting on the ball. While the thing certainly has enough road-hugging weight to keep the balls in place, it strikes me as a bit precarious.

    Really, I don't think you need anything more than just the screws and a flat peice of (relatively thick) mild steel to sit them on.

    Doc.
    I have a 1" ball carbide bur. I'll increase the cup diameter/depth a tad on the set screws, countersink the steel pads spherically, and grease the ball. Overkill? Definitely, but, it being a nice, beautifully built old lathe and all, I just like the idea of smooth and fitted metal surfaces sliding on each other. Adjustments will be a bit easier on the arm, and, if it saves me releveling the thing even once, because the set screw and pad surfaces didn't deform, it will have been worth it.

    ...may have to put a rubber hose dust boot on it too, ha, ha.

  6. #66
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    You asked about the spindle taper, Doc. It appears to be a #5 Morse taper - 1.475" small end tapering out to 1.748", in 5.19 distance.

  7. #67
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    Cutting 4" x 4" levelling pad blanks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20170201_150819.jpg  

  8. #68
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    The bearings are a bad idea.

    You have to think about how it's actually going to work if you go through all the trouble to do that.

    Ideally, a round part seats in a straight taper in a singular circular ring of contact.

    BUT is the taper you machine in the ends of your setscrews going to be perfectly concentric with the setscrew's threads? Probably not. It will be way worse if you try to cut a .5" radius with a carbide burr.

    When it is not concentric the setscrew will try to force your steel leveling pads sideways as you turn the screws.

    All that work will be a big waste of time.

    I would put a shallow flat in the pads (like plunge a 1"+ endmill in .080") and use the setscrews as is. This way your imperfect setscrews will have some wiggle room.

    If the original maker thought the leveling screws were real important they would have made them fine pitch thread.

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  10. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    The bearings are a bad idea.

    You have to think about how it's actually going to work if you go through all the trouble to do that.

    Ideally, a round part seats in a straight taper in a singular circular ring of contact.

    BUT is the taper you machine in the ends of your setscrews going to be perfectly concentric with the setscrew's threads? Probably not. It will be way worse if you try to cut a .5" radius with a carbide burr.

    When it is not concentric the setscrew will try to force your steel leveling pads sideways as you turn the screws.

    All that work will be a big waste of time.

    I would put a shallow flat in the pads (like plunge a 1"+ endmill in .080") and use the setscrews as is. This way your imperfect setscrews will have some wiggle room.

    If the original maker thought the leveling screws were real important they would have made them fine pitch thread.
    Thanks for the info. Acceptable concentricity should be easy enough if I cut some decent 1" internal threads in a 1.5" diameter rod of whatever and leaving that chucked up, back the set screws in, and then true their cup end up. On the steel pads I'm going with a straight hole with beveled edge. The rubber machine pads under the steel pads should allow for a little wiggle room.

    I realize that the levelling screws are not that important, but then, their not being that important is not that important either. It is just something that I want to do. Springfield made lathes for everyone else. I'm doing this for myself. I'm going to like looking at it every day.

  11. #70
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    ...meanwhile, I started cleaning up the base pedestals. The existing paint scheme is lumpy green over grey, non of which I care to keep. I'm leaning towards an unpainted, wax finish. My basement has exceedingly low humidity.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20170206_162926.jpg  

  12. #71
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    Another Springfield available.
    For those following this site and for the OP there is a Springfield for sale in Southern Ontario. Looks pretty complete.
    If you needed pictures or dimensions for certain parts you might be able to contact him for more photo's and dimensions.
    Here's the link on Kijiji.
    Harold
    PS here is picture for posterity
    _35.jpg
    Last edited by Harold Mulder; 02-07-2017 at 09:50 AM. Reason: added picture

  13. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Mulder View Post
    Another Springfield available.
    For those following this site and for the OP there is a Springfield for sale in Southern Ontario. Looks pretty complete.
    If you needed pictures or dimensions for certain parts you might be able to contact him for more photo's and dimensions.
    Here's the link on Kijiji.
    Harold
    PS here is picture for posterity
    _35.jpg
    Looks like they painted it while completely assembled, even the stuff lying in the chip tray.

  14. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by morestainless View Post
    Looks like they painted it while completely assembled, even the stuff lying in the chip tray.
    -That's pretty common. Note the overspray on the floor around the bases, as well.

    At least they masked the important stuff. I remember somebody posting an eBay lathe where they'd painted the entire thing blue- ways, leadscrew, handles, chuck, the works.

    'Course, my favorite ones are Hardinges on eBay- nice and glossy, with a well-done, properly masked paintjob that make them look clean and low miles... but then they have an operator switch panel that's worn down to bare aluminum, with all the labels rubbed off entirely.

    Probably still has water from the pressure-washing in the coolant sump.

    Doc.

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  16. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Mulder View Post
    Another Springfield available.
    -The thing is Springfields just aren't one of those "sought after" lathes. Yeah, people will buy them if nothing better is available nearby (which was more or less my case ) but nobody actively seeks them out, like they do a 10EE or a Pacemaker.

    Doc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post
    -The thing is Springfields just aren't one of those "sought after" lathes. Yeah, people will buy them if nothing better is available nearby (which was more or less my case ) but nobody actively seeks them out, like they do a 10EE or a Pacemaker.

    Doc.
    Perhaps that would have been otherwise had they offered flame-hardened ways. I havd always been watching for a smaller (14" - 16") Sidney. The Springfield will do nicely though.

  18. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by morestainless View Post
    Perhaps that would have been otherwise had they offered flame-hardened ways.
    -I'm told mine has hard ways, and a '49 catalog that another PM'er forwarded to me suggests all models shown had hard ways.

    I know on mine, the saddle is worn deeper than the ways are.

    Doc.

  19. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocsMachine View Post

    I know on mine, the saddle is worn deeper than the ways are.

    Doc.
    On mine as well. From T. Griffiths, "Beds were all straight, without the option of a gap, and cast in Springfield's own foundry using a mixture of cast iron with 40 to 60% steel together with nickel and chrome additives."

    Maybe they just needed a catchy trade name for their bed alloy.

  20. #78
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    I'm digging the bare iron finish but it does take a bit of work to get the black, tar-like filler off that lies under the layers of green and grey paint.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20170228_165349.jpg  

  21. #79
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    The first of 8, 3/4" thick, bearing bearing foot pads.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20170301_000109.jpg   20170301_002423.jpg   20170301_002438.jpg  

  22. #80
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    A cheap HF needle scaler makes pretty quick work of getting the old layers of paint off.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20170324_165103.jpg  


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